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School Age Children

Disparity of SED recovery: Community initiatives to enhance a system of care mental health transformation

Individual Author: 
Grape, Annette
Plum, Kathleen C.
Fielding, Stephen L.

How do youth from various community groups designated as having a serious emotional disturbance (SED) recover over time? We conducted an evaluation of a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration System of Care grant initiative for Monroe County, New York, to answer this and other questions. We looked at outcome differences over time using the Behavioral and Emotional Ratings Scale’s (2nd ed.) overall strength scores among youth living in four geographical places at the start of services: high-income urban, low-income urban, suburban, and rural.

Resilience in children: Developmental perspectives

Individual Author: 
Masten, Ann S.
Barnes, Andrew J.

Advances in developmental resilience science are highlighted with commentary on implications for pediatric systems that aspire to promote healthy development over the life course. Resilience science is surging along with growing concerns about the consequences of adverse childhood experiences on lifelong development. Resilience is defined as the capacity of a system to adapt successfully to challenges that threaten the function, survival, or future development of the system.

Resilience of children with refugee statuses: A research review

Individual Author: 
Pieloch, Kerrie A.
Marks, Amy K.
McCullough, Mary Beth

Over the past several decades, an increasing number of refugee children and families have involuntarily migrated to countries around the world to seek safety and refuge. As the refugee population increases, it is becoming more important to understand factors that promote and foster resilience among refugee youth. The present review examines the past 20 years of resilience research with refugee children to identify individual, family, school, community, and societal factors fostering resilience.

Maternal monitoring knowledge change and adolescent externalizing behaviors in low-income African American and Latino families

Individual Author: 
Chang, Tzu-Fen
Baolian Qin, Desiree

Drawing on a sample of 318 African American and 354 Latino urban, low-income families, we identify maternal monitoring knowledge trajectories and examine which trajectory predicts fewer late-adolescent externalizing problems and which family and neighborhood factors predict trajectories with positive implications for lateadolescent externalizing behaviors. The majority of adolescents in both groups perceived long-term high levels of maternal monitoring knowledge throughout adolescence—stably high for the African American sample and high for the Latino sample.

Strong at the broken places: The resiliency of low-income parents

Individual Author: 
Wilson-Simmons, Renée
Jiang, Yang
Aratani, Yumiko

Despite the multitude of obstacles that low-income parents face, many of them succeed in helping their children flourish. They raise children who possess the social-emotional competence needed to develop and keep friendships; establish good relationships with parents, teachers, and other adults; and experience a range of achievements that contribute to their selfconfidence, self-esteem, and self-efficacy.

Long-term effects of social-emotional learning on receipt of special education and grade retention: Evidence from a randomized trial of INSIGHTS

Individual Author: 
McCormick, Meghan P.
Neuhaus, Robin
Horn, E. Parham
O'Connor, Erin E.
White, Hope S.
Harding, Samantha
Cappella, Elise
McClowry, Sandee

Social–Emotional Learning (SEL) programs are school-based preventive interventions that aim to improve children’s social–emotional skills and behavioral development. Although meta-analytic research has shown that SEL programs can improve academic and behavioral outcomes in the short term, few studies have examined program effects on receipt of special education services and grade retention in the longer term.

Are Hispanic, Asian, Native American, or language-minority children overrepresented in special education?

Individual Author: 
Morgan, Paul L.
Farkas, George
Cook, Michael
Strassfeld, Natasha M.
Hillemeier, Marianne M.
Pun, Wik Hung
Wang, Yangyang
Schussler, Deborah L.

We conducted a best-evidence synthesis of 22 studies to examine whether systemic bias explained minority disproportionate overrepresentation in special education. Of the total regression model estimates, only 7/168 (4.2%), 14/208 (6.7%), 2/37 (5.4%), and 6/91 (6.6%) indicated statistically significant overrepresentation for Hispanic, Asian, Native American, and English language learner (ELL) or language-minority children, respectively.

Gender and conflict resolution strategies in Spanish teen couples: Their relationship with jealousy and emotional dependency

Individual Author: 
Perles, Fabiola
San Martín, Jesús
Canto, Jesús M.

Previous research has pointed to the need to address the study of violence in teen couples. However, research has not delved into the study of the variables related to the different types of violence employed by boys and girls. The purpose of this study was to test whether gender, jealousy, and dependency predict specific strategies for conflict resolution (psychological aggression and mild physical aggression).

Youth–Adult connectedness: A key protective factor for adolescent health

Individual Author: 
Sieving, Renee E.
McRee, Annie-Laurie
McMorris, Barbara J.
Shlafer, Rebecca J.
Gower, Amy L.
Kapa, Hillary M.
Beckman, Kara J.
Plowman, Shari L.
Resnick, Michael D.
Doty, Jennifer L.

Over the past 30 years, prevention science in the adolescent health field has moved from interventions focused on preventing single problem behaviors to efforts employing a dual approach, addressing risk factors that predict problems while simultaneously nurturing protective factors and promoting positive development. Through an examination of previous research and empirical case examples with vulnerable youth, this article considers the hypothesis that adolescents’ sense of connectedness to caring adults acts as a protective factor against a range of risk behaviors.

Services according to mental health needs for youth in foster care? – A multi-informant study

Individual Author: 
Larsen, Marit
Baste, Valborg
Bjørknes, Ragnhild
Myrvold, Trine
Lehmann, Stine

Background: Foster children have a high risk of mental disorders. This has contributed to increased international attention to service utilization for youth in foster care. The aim of this study is to examine whether youth in foster care receive services according to need, by using a multi-informant design. Method: Detailed information on the type and frequency of service use during the last 2 years and on youth mental health were collected from foster youths and their carers in Norway (n = 405, aged 11–17 years) through online questionnaires.