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School Age Children

Long-term effects of social-emotional learning on receipt of special education and grade retention: Evidence from a randomized trial of INSIGHTS

Individual Author: 
McCormick, Meghan P.
Neuhaus, Robin
Horn, E. Parham
O'Connor, Erin E.
White, Hope S.
Harding, Samantha
Cappella, Elise
McClowry, Sandee

Social–Emotional Learning (SEL) programs are school-based preventive interventions that aim to improve children’s social–emotional skills and behavioral development. Although meta-analytic research has shown that SEL programs can improve academic and behavioral outcomes in the short term, few studies have examined program effects on receipt of special education services and grade retention in the longer term.

Are Hispanic, Asian, Native American, or language-minority children overrepresented in special education?

Individual Author: 
Morgan, Paul L.
Farkas, George
Cook, Michael
Strassfeld, Natasha M.
Hillemeier, Marianne M.
Pun, Wik Hung
Wang, Yangyang
Schussler, Deborah L.

We conducted a best-evidence synthesis of 22 studies to examine whether systemic bias explained minority disproportionate overrepresentation in special education. Of the total regression model estimates, only 7/168 (4.2%), 14/208 (6.7%), 2/37 (5.4%), and 6/91 (6.6%) indicated statistically significant overrepresentation for Hispanic, Asian, Native American, and English language learner (ELL) or language-minority children, respectively.

Youth–Adult connectedness: A key protective factor for adolescent health

Individual Author: 
Sieving, Renee E.
McRee, Annie-Laurie
McMorris, Barbara J.
Shlafer, Rebecca J.
Gower, Amy L.
Kapa, Hillary M.
Beckman, Kara J.
Plowman, Shari L.
Resnick, Michael D.
Doty, Jennifer L.

Over the past 30 years, prevention science in the adolescent health field has moved from interventions focused on preventing single problem behaviors to efforts employing a dual approach, addressing risk factors that predict problems while simultaneously nurturing protective factors and promoting positive development. Through an examination of previous research and empirical case examples with vulnerable youth, this article considers the hypothesis that adolescents’ sense of connectedness to caring adults acts as a protective factor against a range of risk behaviors.

Services according to mental health needs for youth in foster care? – A multi-informant study

Individual Author: 
Larsen, Marit
Baste, Valborg
Bjørknes, Ragnhild
Myrvold, Trine
Lehmann, Stine

Background: Foster children have a high risk of mental disorders. This has contributed to increased international attention to service utilization for youth in foster care. The aim of this study is to examine whether youth in foster care receive services according to need, by using a multi-informant design. Method: Detailed information on the type and frequency of service use during the last 2 years and on youth mental health were collected from foster youths and their carers in Norway (n = 405, aged 11–17 years) through online questionnaires.

Integration of the Safe Environment for Every Kid (SEEK) model across primary care settings

Individual Author: 
Eismann, Emily A.
Theuerling, Jack
Maguire, Sabine
Hente, Elizabeth A.
Shapiro, Robert A.

This project sought to assess the generalizability, barriers, and facilitators of implementing the Safe Environment for Every Kid (SEEK) model for addressing psychosocial risk factors for maltreatment across multiple primary care settings, including a pediatric practice, federally qualified health center, and family medicine practice. The SEEK model includes screening caregivers for psychosocial risk factors at well-child visits age 0 to 5 years, brief intervention incorporating principles of motivational interviewing to engage caregivers, and referral to treatment.

Pathways to high-quality jobs for young adults PowerPoint

Individual Author: 
Abner, Kristin
Anderson Moore, Kristin
Murphy, Kelly
Ross, Martha
McGuire, Patricia

On June 12, 2019, from 2:00 to 3:30 pm (EDT), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults.  The webinar explored: (1) which job characteristics are relevant to measuring job quality, (2) how education, training, and work-related experiences across the lifespan may contribute to job quality at age 29, and (3) the ways in which interventions and policies can support youth from disadvantaged backgrounds to gain higher quality jobs.

Pathways to high-quality jobs for young adults question and answer document

Individual Author: 
Abner, Kristin
Anderson Moore, Kristin
Murphy, Kelly
Ross, Martha
McGuire, Patricia

On June 12, 2019, from 2:00 to 3:30 pm (EDT), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults.  The webinar explored: (1) which job characteristics are relevant to measuring job quality, (2) how education, training, and work-related experiences across the lifespan may contribute to job quality at age 29, and (3) the ways in which interventions and policies can support youth from disadvantaged backgrounds to gain higher quality jobs.

Pathways to high-quality jobs for young adults transcript

Individual Author: 
Abner, Kristin
Anderson Moore, Kristin
Murphy, Kelly
Ross, Martha
McGuire, Patricia

On June 12, 2019, from 2:00 to 3:30 pm (EDT), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults.  The webinar explored: (1) which job characteristics are relevant to measuring job quality, (2) how education, training, and work-related experiences across the lifespan may contribute to job quality at age 29, and (3) the ways in which interventions and policies can support youth from disadvantaged backgrounds to gain higher quality jobs.

Key federal programs to reduce childhood lead exposures and eliminate associated health impacts

Individual Author: 
The President's Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children

Lead exposure has been linked to a number of health effects in children. The United States has made tremendous progress in reducing lead exposure, resulting in lower childhood blood lead levels over time. This progress has resulted, in part, from the enforcement of multiple U.S. regulations and implementation of numerous federal programs that aim to reduce childhood lead exposures or ameliorate its effects.