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Homeless

The decline of cash assistance and the well-being of poor households with children

Individual Author: 
Shaefer, H. Luke
Edin, Kathryn
Fusaro, Vincent
Wu, Pinghui

Since the early 1990s, the social safety net for families with children in the United States has undergone an epochal transformation. Aid to poor working families has become more generous. In contrast, assistance to the deeply poor has declined sharply, and what remains often takes the form of in-kind aid. A historical view finds that this dramatic change mirrors others. For centuries, the nature and form of poor relief has been driven in part by shifting cultural notions of which social groups constitute the “deserving” and “undeserving” poor. This line was firmly redrawn in the 1990s.

Youth–Adult connectedness: A key protective factor for adolescent health

Individual Author: 
Sieving, Renee E.
McRee, Annie-Laurie
McMorris, Barbara J.
Shlafer, Rebecca J.
Gower, Amy L.
Kapa, Hillary M.
Beckman, Kara J.
Plowman, Shari L.
Resnick, Michael D.
Doty, Jennifer L.

Over the past 30 years, prevention science in the adolescent health field has moved from interventions focused on preventing single problem behaviors to efforts employing a dual approach, addressing risk factors that predict problems while simultaneously nurturing protective factors and promoting positive development. Through an examination of previous research and empirical case examples with vulnerable youth, this article considers the hypothesis that adolescents’ sense of connectedness to caring adults acts as a protective factor against a range of risk behaviors.

What would help DC residents have greater financial security?

Individual Author: 
Elliott, Diana
Quakenbush, Caleb

Washington, DC, is a city of contrasts with respect to residents’ financial security. While some residents are among the country’s most financially secure, others find it hard to make ends meet. High housing costs, unequal opportunity, and economically segregated neighborhoods make it challenging for some residents to feel financially secure and to weather unexpected expenses and emergencies.

Supportive housing program for homeless families: Foster care outcomes and best practices

Individual Author: 
Lenz-Rashid, Sonja

Purpose
This study is an outcome evaluation of Cottage Housing Incorporated's Serna Village Program (CHI), a supportive housing program serving homeless families in Sacramento, California.

Methods
This quasi-experimental study examined a sample of 293 children and youth who lived with their parents in CHI between 2002 and 2009.

Group work with homeless mothers: Promoting resilience through mutual aid

Individual Author: 
Knight, Carolyn

In the article, the author discusses how group work can be used to promote strength and resilience in homeless mothers, based on the current theoretical and empirical literature. The advantages of group work for homeless mothers are identified, as well as the skills and tasks associated with effective leadership of such groups. Common themes that surface in these groups are examined, as are challenges. The author's experiences facilitating a group for homeless mothers in a residential shelter are used to illustrate key points. (Author abstract)

 

Risk and adversity, parenting quality, and children’s social-emotional adjustment in families experiencing homelessness

Individual Author: 
Labella, Madelyn H.
McCormick, Christopher M.
Narayan, Angela J.
Desjardins, Christopher D.
Masten, Ann S.

A multimethod, multi-informant design was used to examine links among sociodemographic risk, family adversity, parenting quality, and child adjustment in families experiencing homelessness. Participants were 245 homeless parents (Mage = 31.0, 63.6% African American) and their 4- to 6-year-old children (48.6% male). Path analyses revealed unique associations by risk domain: Higher sociodemographic risk predicted more externalizing behavior and poorer teacher–child relationships, whereas higher family adversity predicted more internalizing behavior.

Forgotten fathers

Individual Author: 
Hatcher, Daniel L.

Poor fathers like John are largely forgotten, written off as a subset of the unworthy poor. These fathers struggle with poverty - often with near hopelessness - within multiple systems in which they are either entangled or overlooked, such as child-support and welfare programs, family courts, the criminal justice system, housing programs, and the healthcare, education, and foster-care systems.

Denver Pay for Success Initiative: Supportive housing

Individual Author: 
Gillespie, Sarah
Hanson, Devlin
Cunningham, Mary
Pergamit, Michael

A few years ago, Denver’s Crime Prevention and Control Commission (CPCC) recognized that there was a population of “frequent users” - individuals who cycle in and out of jail – who they believed were chronically homeless and suffered from mental health and substance abuse problems. The CPCC did a data match pulling homeless system data, healthcare utilization data, and criminal justice data together for 250 frequent users to see how these individuals touched other systems.

Strengthening grantee capacity through evaluation technical assistance

Individual Author: 
Clary, Elizabeth
Bradley, M. C.

The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

Federal and local efforts to support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness

Individual Author: 
Knas, Emily
Stagner, Matthew
Bradley, M.C.

The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.