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Children and Youth

Forging a path: Final impacts and costs of New York City’s Young Adult Internship Program

Individual Author: 
Cummings, Danielle
Farrell, Mary
Skemer, Melanie

This report presents 30-month impact results from a random assignment evaluation of the Young Adult Internship Program (YAIP), a subsidized employment program for young people in New York City who have become disconnected from school and work. Operated by various provider agencies, YAIP offers disconnected young people between the ages of 16 and 24 a temporary paid internship, as well as various support services.

Experiences of parents and children living in poverty: A review of the qualitative literature

Individual Author: 
Quint, Janet
Griffin, Katherine M.
Kaufman, Jennie
Landers, Patrick
Utterback, Annie

One in five American children — 14.5 million — live in poverty, with even higher proportions among groups such as black and Hispanic children and those in rural areas. While the scholarly literature on families experiencing poverty is sizable, relatively little attention has been paid to how children describe what it is like to be poor, their thoughts and feelings about their economic status, and the roles that they see benefit programs playing in their lives.

Youth experiences of transition from child mental health services to adult mental health services: A qualitative thematic synthesis

Individual Author: 
Broad, Kathleen L.
Sandhu, Vijay K.
Sunderji, Nadiya
Charach, Alice

Background: Adolescence and young adulthood is a vulnerable time during which young people experience many development milestones, as well as an increased incidence of mental illness. During this time, youth also transition between Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) to Adult Mental Health Services (AMHS). This transition puts many youth at risk of disengagement from service use; however, our understanding of this transition from the perspective of youth is limited.

Within and beyond the classroom door: Assessing quality in child care centers

Individual Author: 
Phillips, Deborah
Mekos, Debra
Scarr, Sandra
McCartney, Kathleen
Abbott-Shim, Martha

This study reports data from a multisite study of typical center-based child care and children’s development regarding (a) associations among quality of care defined by structural features, process indicators, and compliance with state regulations, (b) variation in quality based on the stringency of state child care regulations and center compliance, and (c) specific quality indicators that show especially strong links to children’s experiences in child care.

Building a future: Interim impact findings from the YouthBuild evaluation

Individual Author: 
Miller, Cynthia
Millenky, Megan
Schwartz, Lisa
Goble, Lisbeth
Stein, Jillian

Young people have been hit especially hard by changes in the labor market over the past decades. Unemployment among 16- to 24-year-olds increased the most of any age group during the recent recession, and remains more than double that among older adults. The unemployment rate is especially high for young people without high school diplomas. YouthBuild is one program that attempts to help this group, serving over 10,000 of them each year at over 250 organizations nationwide.

No place to call home: Child & youth homelessness in the United States

Individual Author: 
Damron, Neil

In 2013, over 1.2 million children in the United States were identified as homeless. In Wisconsin, the figure was 18,000. Research shows that homeless youth face barriers to education and are more likely to experience heath issues. So what has been done to solve this problem up until now and what are research-informed policy options for the future? (Author abstract)

The Social Security Administration's Youth Transition Demonstration Projects: Profiles of the random assignment projects

Individual Author: 
Martinez, John
Manno, Michelle S.
Baird, Peter
Fraker, Thomas
Honeycutt, Todd
Mamun, Arif
O'Day, Bonnie
Rangarajan, Anu

The transition to adulthood for youth with disabilities, particularly youth receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or other disability program benefits, can be especially challenging. In addition to the host of issues facing all transition-age youth, young people with disabilities face special issues related to health, social isolation, service needs, and lack of access to supports. These challenges complicate their planning for future education and work, and often lead to poor educational and employment outcomes, high risk of dependency, and a lifetime of poverty.

Implementation lessons from the Social Security Administration’s Youth Transition Demonstration

Individual Author: 
Martinez, John
Fraker, Thomas
Manno, Michelle S.
Baird, Peter
Mamun, Arif
O'Day, Bonnie
Rangarajan, Anu
Wittenburg, David

The Social Security Administration (SSA) is conducting the Youth Transition Demonstration (YTD) as part of a broader initiative to encourage disability beneficiaries to return to work. The demonstration provides youth ages 14 through 25 with employment-related services and waivers of certain rules governing the Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance programs, including childhood disability benefits. The waivers augment existing financial incentives for beneficiaries to work.

The Chicago School Readiness Project: Examining the long-term impacts of an early childhood intervention

Individual Author: 
Watts, Tyler W.
Gandhi, Jill
Ibrahim, Deanna A.
Masucci, Michael D.
Raver, C. Cybele

The current paper reports long-term treatment impact estimates for a randomized evaluation of an early childhood intervention designed to promote children's developmental outcomes and improve the quality of Head Start centers serving high-violence and high-crime areas in inner-city Chicago. Initial evaluations of end-of-preschool data reported that the program led to reductions in child behavioral problems and gains in measures of executive function and academic achievement. For this report, we analyzed adolescent follow-up data taken 10 to 11 years after program completion.

The importance of poverty early in childhood

Individual Author: 
Duncan, Greg J.
Magnuson, Katherine

Using a poverty line set at 60% of New Zealand’s median national income, nearly one in five New Zealand children (19%) was poor in 2011 (Figure 1, based on Perry, 2012). This poverty rate is considerably less than that of the United States and Canada, similar to that of Australia, the United Kingdom, Germany and France, and much greater that in Scandinavian countries. These rates are far from immutable; New Zealand’s child poverty rate was much higher in 2004 before social policies were enacted which focused, in part, on the country’s child poverty problem. (Author abstract)