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Children and Youth

Child care as a critical work support: How do variations in local community context, family work needs, and racial/ethnic differences shape access to child care assistance?

Individual Author: 
López, Michael
Dobbins, Dionne
Hepburn, Peter
Sandstrom, Heather

Publicly funded child care represents a critical work support for families, and is a key mechanism for supporting low-income families with a path to economic self-sufficiency. This session looked at how variations in community context (such as the availability of care, responsiveness to nonstandard work hours, and the unique experiences of Latino immigrants) might affect child care access. Michael López (Abt Associates) moderated this session. The presenters used a variety of different methodologies in their research.

 

The great recession and recent employment trends among secondary students in the United States

Individual Author: 
Staff, Jeremy
Johnson, Monica Kirkpatrick
Patrick, Megan E.
Schulenberg, John E.

The Great Recession had substantial effects on the labor market in the United States, as elsewhere. To what extent did secondary students’ employment decline during this time? Which students are leaving the labor market? Are reductions in employment concentrated in particular jobs? To answer these questions, we use data from the Monitoring the Future study, an ongoing study of secondary students in the United States.

National profiles of classroom quality and family involvement: A multilevel examination of proximal influences on Head Start children's school readiness

Individual Author: 
Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.
Wen, Xiaoli
Faria, Ann-Marie
Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie L.
Korfmacher, Jon

Guided by a developmental and ecological model, the study employed latent profile analysis to identify a multilevel typology of family involvement and Head Start classroom quality. Using the nationally representative Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES 1997; N = 1870), six multilevel latent profiles were estimated, characterized by distinct patterns of parent school involvement, parent home involvement, and classroom quality.

Profiles of school readiness among four-year-old Head Start children

Individual Author: 
Halle, Tamara G.
Hair, Elizabeth C.
Wandner, Laura D.
Chien, Nina C.

This study uses the Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) data from 1997 to investigate the degree to which child, family, classroom, teacher, and Head Start program characteristics are related to children's school readiness and continued development over the four-year-old Head Start year. Latent class analyses were used to examine the constellation of school readiness competencies within individual Head Start children in both the fall and spring of the four-year-old Head Start year.

Psychometric analyses of child outcome measures with American Indian and Alaska Native preschoolers: Initial evidence from AI/AN FACES 2015

Individual Author: 
Malone, Lizabeth
Bernstein, Sara
Atkins-Burnett, Sally
Xue, Yange

Introduction

AI/AN FACES 2015 is the first national study of Region XI AI/AN Head Start children and their families, classrooms, and programs. To date, the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES) has been a major source of descriptive information on Head Start and preschool children ages 3 to 5 years old who attend the program. FACES gathers data from Regions I-X, the 10 geographically based Head Start regions, with the most recent round conducted in 2014.

Basic facts about low-income children: Children under 18 years, 2013

Individual Author: 
Jiang, Yang
Ekono, Mercedes
Skinner, Curtis

Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 33 percent of all people in poverty. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (22 percent) live in poor families. Being a child in a low-income or poor family does not happen by chance. Parental education and employment, race/ethnicity, and other factors are associated with children experiencing economic insecurity. This fact sheet describes the demographic, socio-economic, and geographic characteristics of children and their parents.

Basic facts about low-income children: Children under 3 years, 2013

Individual Author: 
Jiang, Yang
Ekono, Mercedes
Skinner, Curtis

Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 33 percent of all people in poverty. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (22 percent) live in poor families. Our very youngest children – infants and toddlers under age 3 years – appear to be particularly vulnerable, with 47 percent living in low-income families, including 25 percent living in poor families. Being a child in a low-income or poor family does not happen by chance.