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The racial ecology of lead poisoning: Toxic inequality in Chicago neighborhoods, 1995-2013

Individual Author: 
Sampson, Robert J.
Winter, Alix S.

This paper examines the racial ecology of lead exposure as a form of environmental inequity, one with both historical and contemporary significance. Drawing on comprehensive data from over one million blood tests administered to Chicago children from 1995-2013 and matched to over 2300 geographic block groups, we address two major questions: (1) What is the nature of the relationship between neighborhood-level racial composition and variability in children’s elevated lead prevalence levels?

Trends in California poverty: 2011–2014

Individual Author: 
Wimer, Christopher
Kimberlin, Sara
Danielson, Caroline
Mattingly, Marybeth
Fisher, Jonathan
Bohn, Sarah

The purpose of this report is to describe recent trends in poverty in California. Throughout this report, we will feature a measure that is inspired by the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM), as it improves on the Official Poverty Measure (OPM) in important ways. (Author abstract)

 

Improving the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices in adolescent reproductive health care services

Individual Author: 
Romero, Lisa M.
Middleton, Dawn
Mueller, Trisha
Avellino, Lia
Hallum-Montes, Rachel

Purpose: The purposes of the study were to describe baseline data in the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices among health center partners as part of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative and to identify opportunities for health center improvement.

Understanding barriers to initial treatment engagement among underserved families seeking mental health services

Individual Author: 
Ofonedu, Mirian E.
Belcher, Harolyn M. E.
Budhathoki, Chakra
Gross, Deborah A.

This mixed method study examined factors associated with parents not attending their child’s mental health treatment after initially seeking help for their 2–5 year old child. It was part of a larger study comparing two evidence-based treatments among low-income racial/ethnic minority families seeking child mental health services. Of 123 parents who initiated mental health treatment (71 % African American or multi-racial; 97.6 % low-income), 36 (29.3 %) never attended their child’s first treatment session.

Risk and adversity, parenting quality, and children’s social-emotional adjustment in families experiencing homelessness

Individual Author: 
Labella, Madelyn H.
McCormick, Christopher M.
Narayan, Angela J.
Desjardins, Christopher D.
Masten, Ann S.

A multimethod, multi-informant design was used to examine links among sociodemographic risk, family adversity, parenting quality, and child adjustment in families experiencing homelessness. Participants were 245 homeless parents (Mage = 31.0, 63.6% African American) and their 4- to 6-year-old children (48.6% male). Path analyses revealed unique associations by risk domain: Higher sociodemographic risk predicted more externalizing behavior and poorer teacher–child relationships, whereas higher family adversity predicted more internalizing behavior.

Taking care of mine: Can child support become a family-building institution?

Individual Author: 
Edin, Kathryn
Nelson, Timothy J.
Butler, Rachel
Francis, Robert

U.S. children are more likely to live apart from a biological parent than at any time in history. Although the Child Support Enforcement system has tremendous reach, its policies have not kept pace with significant economic, demographic, and cultural changes. Narrative analysis of in-depth interviews with 429 low-income noncustodial fathers suggests that the system faces a crisis of legitimacy. Visualization of language used to describe all forms child support show that the formal system is considered punitive and to lead to a loss of power and autonomy.

School readiness gains made by ethnically diverse children in poverty attending center-based childcare and public school pre-kindergarten programs

Individual Author: 
Winsler, Adam
Tran, Henry
Hartman, Suzanne C.
Madigan, Amy L.
Manfra, Louis
Bleiker, Charles

Although intensive early childhood interventions and high quality preschool programs have been shown to foster children's school readiness, little is known about the school readiness gains made by ethnically and linguistically diverse children in poverty receiving subsidies to attend center-based childcare or those in public school pre-kindergarten programs.

Effects of ParentCorps in prekindergarten on child mental health and academic performance: Follow-up of a randomized clinical trial through 8 years of age

Individual Author: 
Brotman, Laurie Miller
Dawson-McClure, Spring
Kamboukos, Dimitra
Huang, Keng-Yen
Calzada, Esther J.
Goldfeld, Keith
Petkova, Eva

Importance  Low-income minority children living in urban neighborhoods are at high risk for mental health problems and underachievement. ParentCorps, a family-centered, school-based intervention in prekindergarten, improves parenting and school readiness (ie, self-regulation and preacademic skills) in 2 randomized clinical trials. The longer-term effect on child mental health and academic performance is not known.

Father reentry and child outcomes

Individual Author: 
Craigie, Terry-Ann
Pratt, Eleanor
McDaniel, Marla

More than 2.7 million children have an incarcerated parent, and many more have experienced a parent’s incarceration at some point. Research finds that parental incarceration negatively affects children’s physical, mental, and emotional health. One might presume that child outcomes improve when a parent returns from incarceration, but the evidence shows that reentry can be difficult for parents and their children.

Employment equity: Louisiana’s path to inclusive prosperity

Individual Author: 
Crowder Jr., James A.
Scoggins, Justin
Treuhaft, Sarah

While Louisiana’s economy has improved in recent years, people of color are still disproportionately represented among the state’s economically insecure. Men of color face particular barriers to employment due to discrimination and gaps in work-based skills. If full employment was achieved across all gender and racial groups, Louisiana's economy could be $3.5 billion stronger each year. Investing in men of color and critical education and training systems for Louisiana’s workforce will shift the state toward a course for greater prosperity for all.