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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE)

Publisher ID: 
SSRC-DID-0001999

The national evaluation of the responsible fatherhood, marriage, and family strengthening grants for incarcerated and re-entering fathers and their partners: Parenting from prison: Innovative programs to support incarcerated and reentering fathers

Individual Author: 
McKay, Tasseli
Corwin, Elise
Herman-Stahl, Mindy
Bir, Anupa
Lindquist, Christine
Smiley-McDonald, Hope
Siegel, Sarah

This brief describes implementation findings from the evaluation of Responsible Fatherhood, Marriage, and Family Strengthening Grants for Incarcerated and Reentering Fathers and Their Partners funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Administration for Children and Families (ACF) and the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE). It documents innovative parenting supports provided to incarcerated and reentering fathers and their families.

Strategies for building healthy relationship skills among couples affected by incarceration

Individual Author: 
Lindquist, Christine
McKay, Tasseli
Bir, Anupa

This brief describes implementation findings from the evaluation of Responsible Fatherhood, Marriage, and Family Strengthening Grants for Incarcerated and Reentering Fathers and Their Partners (MFS-IP).  It documents approaches to teaching relationship skills among incarcerated and reentering fathers and their families.  The multi-year implementation and impact evaluation of the MFS-IP grants is funded by the U.S.

Addressing domestic violence in family strengthening programs for couples affected by incarceration

Individual Author: 
McKay, Tasseli
Bir, Anupa
Lindquist, Christine
Steffey, Danielle
Keyes, Vince
Siegel, Sarah

This brief presents findings from the evaluation of Responsible Fatherhood, Marriage and Family Strengthening Grants for Incarcerated and Reentering Fathers and Their Partners. It details the strategies grantees used to address domestic violence in the MFS-IP programs and describes baseline findings from the impact study on the prevalence of domestic violence among study couples prior to incarceration. The multiyear implementation and impact evaluation of the MFS-IP grants is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (author abstract)

Five years later: Final implementation lessons from the evaluation of responsible fatherhood, marriage and family strengthening grants for incarcerated and reentering fathers and their partners

Individual Author: 
McKay, Tasseli
Lundquist, Christine
Bir, Anupa

The Responsible Fatherhood, Marriage and Family Strengthening Grants for Incarcerated and Reentering Fathers and Their Partners (MFS-IP) funded services to support families in which one parent was incarcerated or recently released. The Office of Family Assistance (OFA) within the Administration for Children and Families of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services provided up to $500,000 per year for five years to twelve grantees.

Coming of age: Employment outcomes for youth who age out of foster care through their middle twenties

Individual Author: 
Ehrle Macomber, Jennifer
Cuccaro-Alamin, Stephanie
Duncan, Dean
Kuehn, Daniel
McDaniel, Marla
Vericker, Tracy
Pergamit, Mike
Needell, Barbara
Kum, Hye-Chung
Stewart, Joy
Lee, Chung-Kwon
Barth, Richard P.

This study examines employment outcomes for youth who age out of foster care through their middle twenties in three states: California, Minnesota, and North Carolina. The study linked child welfare, Unemployment Insurance (UI), and public assistance administrative data to assess outcomes. Results suggest that youth who age out of foster care continue to experience poor employment outcomes at age 24 and generally follow one of four employment trajectories as they transition to adulthood.(author abstract)

HHMI Grantee Implementation Evaluation: Understanding Hispanic diversity: A “one size approach” to service delivery may not fit all

Individual Author: 
Bouchet, Stacey
Torres, Luis
Hyra, Allison

This brief, the third in a series using qualitative data collected during the Hispanic Healthy Marriage Initiative Grantee Implementation Evaluation, describes the Hispanic population of the United States in terms of characteristics, such as age, gender distribution, economic indicators, educational attainment, nativity (U.S.-born vs. foreign-born), country of origin, generational status (immigrant or first generation vs. second or later generation), and linguistic preferences and proficiency.

HHMI grantee implementation evaluation: Addressing domestic violence in Hispanic healthy relationship programs

Individual Author: 
Bouchet, Stacey
Torres, Luis
Hyra, Allison

This brief, the fourth in a series of six using qualitative data collected during the Hispanic Healthy Marriage Initiative Grantee Implementation Evaluation, describes how study sites addressed domestic violence in the family strengthening and relationship education services they provided.  The major finding of the study is that programs treated domestic violence with requisite seriousness and expressed concern about the prevalence and effects of domestic violence in their communities. (author abstract)

Employment and income supports for homeless people

Individual Author: 
Long, David
Rio, John
Rosen, Jeremy

In this paper, the authors synthesize the findings of recent studies examining the role of mainstream programs such as Social Security Administration (SSA) disability programs, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and Workforce Investment Act (WIA) initiatives in enhancing employment and incomes for people who have experienced homelessness. They also describe the design and outcomes of targeted programs designed specifically to address employment and income support for people who are homeless.

Permanent housing for homeless families: A review of opportunities and impediments

Individual Author: 
Khadduri, Jill
Kaul, Bulbul

This report focuses on the role of federally funded rental housing subsidies in helping parents who have become homeless achieve permanent housing. There is strong evidence that families who receive housing assistance are more likely to remain stably housed than those without such assistance. This is not surprising, given that most adults who become homeless have limited education and earnings potential and, therefore, limited ability to pay market rents (or buy a housing unit) even when they are employed full time.

Health, housing, and service supports for three groups of people experiencing chronic homelessness

Individual Author: 
Burt, Martha R.
Wilkins, Carol

In 2014, most homeless people will become Medicaid-eligible under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) of 2010 based on their low incomes. Many homeless people have complex physical and behavioral health conditions for which they seek care through frequent use of emergency rooms and inpatient hospitalization, at considerable cost in public resources.