Skip to main content
Back to Top

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Services, Office of Research and Analysis

Publisher ID: 
SSRC-DID-0002046
Country: 

Empirical Bayes shrinkage estimates of state Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation rates in 2007-2009 for all eligible people and the working poor

Individual Author: 
Cunnyngham, Karen
Castner, Laura
Sukasih, Amang

This report presents estimates that, for each state, measure the need for SNAP and the program’s effectiveness in each of the three years from 2007 to 2009. The estimated numbers of people eligible for SNAP measure the need for the program. The estimated SNAP participation rates measure, state by state, the program’s performance in reaching its target population.

Benefit redemption patterns in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program

Individual Author: 
Castner, Laura
Henke, Juliette

In this study, we examine patterns of SNAP benefit redemption, particularly related to the timing and amount of purchases and the rate at which households exhaust their benefits. We identify changes within fiscal year 2009 to gain insights into how the April benefit increase affected spending patterns. We also make comparisons with results of a similar study conducted for fiscal year 2003 (Cole and Lee 2005) to see if households exhausted their benefits sooner in 2009 than they had in the past.

Determinants of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program entry and exit in the mid-2000s

Individual Author: 
Mabli, James
Godfrey, Thomas
Castner, Laura
Tordella, Stephen
Foran, Priscilla

Participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) in any month is the net result of people entering and exiting the program what is often referred to as program long participants spend on the program, and how often those that exit the program re-enter it.1 Another important area of research, however, and the main objective of this report, seeks to understand the factors associated with entering and exiting the program.

Characteristics and dietary patterns of healthy and less-healthy eaters in the low-income population

Individual Author: 
Ben-Shalom, Yonatan
Fox, Mary Kay
Newby, P.K.

This report presents two types of information about healthy eaters and less-healthy eaters in the low-income population: (1) descriptive information about the sociodemographic and dietary characteristics of individuals in each group and (2) a description of distinct dietary patterns followed by individuals in each group, as identified through a cluster analysis of their dietary intake. We defined low-income individuals as those from households with income below 200 percent of the federal poverty level.

Trends in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation rates: Fiscal year 2002 to fiscal year 2009

Individual Author: 
Leftin, Joshua
Eslami, Esa
Strayer, Mark

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) helps low-income individuals purchase food so that they can obtain a nutritious diet. One important measure of program performance is the ability to reach its target population, as indicated by the percentage of people eligible for benefits who actually participate. This report is the latest in a series on SNAP participation rates. Estimates are based on the March 2010 Current Population Survey and program administrative data for Fiscal Year (FY) 2009. The findings represent national participation rates for FY 2009. (author abstract)

WIC eligibles and coverage - 1994 to 2007: Estimates of the population of women, infants, and children eligible for WIC benefits

Individual Author: 
Harper, Ed
Hirschman, Jay
Mabli, James
Nelson, Sandi
Hourihan, Kerianne

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) provides food, nutrition education, breastfeeding support, and health care and social service referrals to nutritionally at-risk low-income pregnant women, new mothers, infants, and children through age 4. This report offers updated estimates of the population that met these criteria and was eligible for WIC benefits in each of the years 1994 through 2007. These revise a set of estimates published by the USDA Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) in 2006.

Direct certification in the National School Lunch Program: State implementation progress school year 2010-2011

Individual Author: 
Moore, Quinn
Conway, Kevin
Kyler, Brandon

This report responds to the legislative requirement of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (P.L.110-246) to assess the effectiveness of State and local efforts to directly certify children for free school meals under the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Direct certification is a process conducted by the States and by local educational agencies (LEAs) to certify certain children for free school meals without the need for household applications.

Dynamics of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation in the mid-2000s

Individual Author: 
Mabli, James
Tordella, Stephen
Castner, Laura
Godfrey, Thomas
Foran, Priscilla

The purpose of this study is to investigate SNAP caseload dynamics to understand what drives changes in SNAP participation over time. Understanding participation dynamics is critical to developing effective SNAP policies. Well-designed studies, for example, can inform policymakers about what factors lead individuals to enter and exit SNAP; how long they typically participate; and how their participation decisions are affected by changes in individual circumstances, overall economic conditions, and program policies.

Effects of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC): A review of recent research

Individual Author: 
Colman, Silvie
Nichols-Barrer, Ira P.
Redline, Julie E.
Devaney, Barbara L.
Ansell, Sara V.
Joyce, Ted

In recent years, the WIC program has continued to be the subject of much research. Researchers have produced more-refined methodological approaches and attempted to measure WIC’s impact on previously unmeasured outcomes. The present report is intended to update the literature review completed by Fox et al. (2004) by comprehensively reviewing all published research on WIC program impacts between 2002 and 2010 as well as “gray” or unpublished research completed between 1999 and 2010.

Moving from jobs to careers: Engaging low-wage workers in career advancement

Individual Author: 
Tessler, Betsy L.
Seith, David
Rucks, Zawadi

The Work Advancement and Support Center (WASC) demonstration presents a new approach to helping low-wage and dislocated workers take strategic steps to advance — by increasing their wages or work hours, upgrading their skills, or finding better jobs. At the same time, these workers are encouraged to increase and stabilize their income in the short term by making the most of available work supports, such as food stamps, public health insurance, subsidized child care, and tax credits for eligible low-income families.