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Urban Institute

Publisher ID: 
SSRC-DID-0001950

Housing for young adults in extended federally funded foster care: Best practices for states

Individual Author: 
Dworsky, Amy
Dasgupta, Denali

In 2008, the Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act gave states the option to extend the age of eligibility for federally funded foster care to 21. Twenty-five states and the District of Columbia have extended or are in the process of extending federally funded foster care with a safe, stable, and developmentally appropriate place to live. There are gaps in our knowledge of best practices for housing young adults in extended care, the housing options currently available to those young adults, and how those options vary across and within states.

Providing Medicaid to youth formerly in foster care under the Chafee option: Informing implementation of the Affordable Care Act

Individual Author: 
Pergamit, Mike
McDaniel, Marla
Chen, Vicki
Howell, Embry M.
Hawkins, Amelia

This report draws lessons from 30 states' implementation of existing optional Medicaid coverage for youth who age out of foster care and applies them to decisions and plans states will consider as they implement new ACA coverage that goes into effect in 2014. Wide variations in how states have implemented the so called Chafee Option are focused on eligibility criteria, enrollment processes, and recertification processes.

Youth Count! Process study

Individual Author: 
Pergamit, Mike
Cunningham, Mary K.
Burt, Martha R.
Lee, Pamela
Howell, Brent
Dumlao Bertumen, Kassie

Homelessness among unaccompanied youth is a hidden problem: the number of young people who experience homelessness each year is largely unknown. To improve the national response to youth homelessness, policymakers need better data on the magnitude of the problem. Youth Count! is a Federal interagency initiative that aims to improve counts of unaccompanied homeless youth. Nine communities participated in the initiative by expanding their annual homeless point-in-time efforts to increase coverage of homeless youth.

Homeless LGBTQ youth

Individual Author: 
Cunningham, Mary K.
Pergamit, Mike
Astone, Nan Marie
Luna, Jessica

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, or Questioning (LGBTQ) youth are over-represented among the homeless youth population. Researchers and practitioners are working to improve data on homeless youth, especially LGBTQ youth, across the country. This brief summarizes the findings on LGBTQ homeless youth counted during the 2013 YouthCount!, a federal interagency initiative that aims to improve counts of unaccompanied homeless youth. The brief also shares best practices on how to improve counts of LGBTQ homeless youth, and areas where policymakers can act to improve LGBTQ youth outcomes.

Pilot project to assess validation of EITC eligibility with state data

Individual Author: 
Pergamit, Mike
Maag, Elaine
Hanson, Devlin
Ratcliffe, Caroline
Edelstein, Sara
Minton, Sarah

The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) annually delivers over $60 billion to low-income working families. The Office of Management and Budget identifies the EITC as having the highest improper payment rate among 13 high error programs. We explore whether state SNAP and TANF administrative data can be used by IRS to reduce erroneous payments and target outreach efforts. Too few EITC claimants receive TANF to make the TANF data useful.

Helping families involved in the child welfare system achieve housing stability

Individual Author: 
Cunningham, Mary K.
Pergamit, Mike
Baum, Abigail
Luna, Jessica

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)‘s Family Unification Program (FUP) provides low-income families involved in the child welfare system with housing vouchers. FUP is an important vehicle for understanding three issues: (1) the overlap between the child welfare system, housing, and homelessness; (2) how to provide housing to vulnerable, high-need families; and (3) how to facilitate cross-system partnerships between public housing agencies and child welfare agencies.

Practical considerations for pay for success evaluations

Individual Author: 
Gillespie, Sarah
Liberman, Akiva
Zweig, Janine M.
Hanson, Devlin
Pergamit, Mike
Cunningham, Mary K.

Evidence is at the core of the pay for success movement, which pushes government to rigorously evaluate programs and pay only for those that achieve positive outcomes. Evidence, however, is only as good as the evaluation that produces it. As such, evaluators are an integral part of any PFS project, from beginning to end. In these projects, the evaluator implements activities that assess program outcomes in order to determine success payments from government to investors. Evaluators should be engaged early in PFS project development.

Breaking the homelessness–jail cycle in Denver

Individual Author: 
Gillespie, Sarah
Hanson, Devlin
Cunningham, Mary K.
Pergamit, Mike
Kooragayala, Shiva

An experiment in supportive housing is beginning to pay off for the city of Denver, its homeless residents, and a group of investors banking on social impact. This fact sheet highlights early results from the Denver Supportive Housing Social Impact Bond Initiative. (Author abstract)

 

The Well-Being and Basic Needs Survey: A new data source for monitoring the health and well-being of individuals and families

Individual Author: 
Karpman, Michael
Gonzalez, Dulce
Zuckerman, Stephen

In December 2017, the Urban Institute launched the Well-Being and Basic Needs Survey (WBNS) to monitor changes in individual and family health and well-being at a time when policymakers seek significant changes to programs that help low-income families pay for food, health care, housing, and other basic needs. The new annual survey is a key component of the Institute’s From Safety Net to Solid Ground project supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and other foundations.

Material hardship among nonelderly adults and their families in 2017: Implications for the safety net

Individual Author: 
Karpman, Michael
Zuckerman, Stephen
Gonzalez, Dulce

Federal and state policymakers are seeking fundamental changes to the publicly financed safety net. Throughout 2018, officials have been considering or enacting new policies altering major federal programs that help low-income people meet their basic needs for food, medical care, and shelter.