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Urban Institute

Publisher ID: 
SSRC-DID-0001950

Employment after prison: A longitudinal study of releasees in three states

Individual Author: 
Visher, Christy
Debus-Sherrill, Sara
Yahner, Jennifer

In this brief, we explore the reality of finding employment after prison from the perspective of 740 former male prisoners in Illinois, Ohio, and Texas. Interviews were conducted as part of a comprehensive, longitudinal study entitled Returning Home: Understanding the Challenges of Prisoner Reentry. Eight months after prison, 65 percent of respondents had been employed at some point, but only 45 percent were currently employed. Those who held a job while in prison or participated in job-training programs had better employment outcomes after release.

Promoting social and economic mobility in Washington, DC: Challenges and choices for the new mayor

Individual Author: 
Acs, Gregory
Eyster, Lauren
Schwabish, Jonathan

As Mayor Bowser settles into her office, she leads a city that is growing more prosperous. Yet too many DC residents are not sharing in that prosperity. Since the last recession began in 2007, median income in DC has grown by three times the national average, reaching nearly $61,000 in 2013. Yet DC’s unemployment rate persistently remains about 1 percentage point higher than in the nation as a whole. Removing barriers to mobility and creating meaningful opportunities for all DC residents to prosper require various strategies.

Understanding local workforce systems

Individual Author: 
Eyster, Lauren
Durham, Christin
Van Noy, Michelle
Damron, Neil

A local workforce system encompasses the organizations and activities that prepare people for employment, helps workers advance in their careers, and ensures a skilled workforce exists to support local industry and the local economy over time. This brief explains who a local workforce system serves, the organizations involved, and the functions it performs. We offer a useful framework for readers to better understand their own local workforce systems and identify new ways to support their local workforces and economies. (Author abstract)

 

TAACCCT goals, design, and evaluation: The Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training grant program brief 1

Individual Author: 
Mikelson, Kelly S.
Eyster, Lauren
Durham, Christin
Cohen, Elissa

The Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program is a $2 billion federal workforce investment aimed at helping community colleges across the nation increase their capacity to provide education and training programs for in-demand jobs. This brief is one of four briefs from the national evaluation of the TAACCCT grants produced by The Urban Institute under contract to the US Department of Labor.

TANF on the brink of change: Reflections of mothers receiving cash assistance in the District of Columbia

Individual Author: 
Hahn, Heather
Coffey, Amelia
Pratt, Eleanor

The District of Columbia is changing its Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) cash assistance program to promote better long-term outcomes for families and children. The most recent change, implemented April 2018, is an end to the five-year limit for full benefits. Previously, families who received benefits received reduced cash assistance after 60 months in the program. They will now receive the full amount.

Workforce development and low-income adults and youth: The future under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014

Individual Author: 
Eyster, Lauren
Nightingale, Demetra Smith

After years of continuing resolutions, Congress replaced the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) with the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014 (WIOA). WIOA continues WIA’s emphasis on universal services for both job seekers and employers, but includes provisions intended to improve the workforce development system overall. As state and local agencies and workforce boards implement changes introduced with WIOA, they must consider how they will serve customers with barriers to employment and improve current practices.

TAACCCT grantee characteristics: The Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Grant program brief 2

Individual Author: 
Cohen, Elissa
Mikelson, Kelly S.
Durham, Christin
Eyster, Lauren

The Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grant program is a $2 billion federal workforce investment aimed at helping community colleges across the nation increase their capacity to provide education and training programs for in-demand jobs. This brief is one of four briefs from the national evaluation of the TAACCCT grants produced by The Urban Institute under contract to the US Department of Labor.

Bringing evidence to the refugee integration debate

Individual Author: 
Bernstein, Hamutal
DuBois, Nicole

There is a major disconnect between the current policy debate and the reality of refugee outcomes in the US. After a tumultuous year of policy changes for the refugee resettlement program and as refugees are being framed as security, economic, and cultural threats, policymakers must consider the evidence base on the realities of refugees and their local communities.

Coming together for change: A qualitative study of social connectedness outcomes produced by the Love Your Block program

Individual Author: 
Bogle, Mary
Edmonds, Leiha
Gourevitch, Ruth

The Cities of Service Love Your Block (LYB) program connects mayor’s offices with community residents to revitalize their neighborhoods one block at a time. Cities of Service commissioned this study to better understand how the LYB program affects the social connectedness of the residents and communities involved in LYB mini-grant projects, as well as how social connectedness outcomes might relate to impact outcomes, such as public safety.

Hiring well, doing good in Georgia: Employment and earnings patterns and perspectives on policy

Individual Author: 
Lerman, Robert I.

Georgia’s economy suffered higher job losses in percentage terms than the US average during the Great Recession but regained jobs faster as well. This report examines Georgia’s job market and how to improve its performance. It covers educational, employment, and wage patterns by demographic group, family status, and region. The focus is on recent high school dropouts and graduates. The policy section reviews Georgia’s employment, training, and career-focused education programs and recommends approaches that can increase the job market success of Georgia’s young adults.