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PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health

Publisher ID: 
SSRC-DID-0003551
Country: 

Long-term effects of parenting-focused preventive interventions to promote resilience of children and adolescents

Individual Author: 
Sandler, Irwin
Ingram, Alexandra
Wolchik, Sharlene
Tein, Jenn-Yun
Winslow, Emily

In this article, we address three questions concerning the long-term effects of parenting-focused preventive interventions: 1) Do prevention programs promote effective parenting in families facing normative stressors as well as those facing frequent adversity? 2) Do parenting programs prevent children’s long-term problems? 3) Do changes in parenting mediate long-term effects of programs? We address these questions by summarizing evidence from 22 programs with randomized trials and followups of three years or longer.

Resilience in children: Developmental perspectives

Individual Author: 
Masten, Ann S.
Barnes, Andrew J.

Advances in developmental resilience science are highlighted with commentary on implications for pediatric systems that aspire to promote healthy development over the life course. Resilience science is surging along with growing concerns about the consequences of adverse childhood experiences on lifelong development. Resilience is defined as the capacity of a system to adapt successfully to challenges that threaten the function, survival, or future development of the system.

Trends in blood lead levels and blood lead testing among US children aged 1 to 5 years, 1988-2004

Individual Author: 
Jones, Robert L.
Homa, David M.
Meyer, Pamela A.
Brody, Debra J.
Caldwell, Kathleen L.
Pirkle, James L.
Brown, Mary Jean

Objectives

To evaluate trends in children's blood lead levels and the extent of blood lead testing of children at risk for lead poisoning from national surveys conducted during a 16-year period in the United States.

Methods

Data for children aged 1 to 5 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III Phase I, 1988-1991, and Phase II, 1991-1994 were compared to data from the survey period 1999-2004.

Results

The association of parent mindfulness with parenting and youth psychopathology across three developmental stages

Individual Author: 
Parent, Justin
McKee, Laura G.
Mahon, Jennifer
Foreh, Rex

The primary purpose of the current study was to test a model examining the process by which parent dispositional mindfulness relates to youth psychopathology through mindful parenting and parenting practices. The universality of the model across youth at three developmental stages was examined: young childhood (3 – 7 yrs.; n = 210), middle childhood (8 – 12 yrs.; n = 200), and adolescence (13 – 17 yrs.; n = 205). Overall, participants were 615 parents (55 % female) and one of their 3-to-17 year old children (45 % female).

Grandmothers’ familism values, adolescent mothers’ parenting efficacy, and children’s well-being

Individual Author: 
Zeiders, Katharine H.
Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.
Jahromi, Laudan B.
Updegraff, Kimberly A.

The current study examined intergenerational processes related to familism values among grandmothers, adolescent mothers, and their children. Mexican-origin families (N = 180) participated in in-home interviews during adolescent mothers' third trimester of pregnancy and 10-, 24-, 48-, and 60-months postpartum. Using longitudinal path analyses, we linked grandmothers' familism values and behaviors to adolescent mothers' parenting processes and, in turn, their child's well-being, taking into account developmentally relevant needs of adolescent mothers.

Improving the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices in adolescent reproductive health care services

Individual Author: 
Romero, Lisa M.
Middleton, Dawn
Mueller, Trisha
Avellino, Lia
Hallum-Montes, Rachel

Purpose: The purposes of the study were to describe baseline data in the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices among health center partners as part of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative and to identify opportunities for health center improvement.

Poverty and child development: A longitudinal study of the impact of the Earned Income Tax Credit

Individual Author: 
Hamad, Rita
Rehkopf, David H.

Although adverse socioeconomic conditions are correlated with worse child health and development, the effects of poverty-alleviation policies are less understood. We examined the associations of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) on child development and used an instrumental variable approach to estimate the potential impacts of income. We used data from the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (n = 8,186) during 1986-2000 to examine effects on the Behavioral Problems Index (BPI) and Home Observation Measurement of the Environment inventory (HOME) scores. We conducted 2 analyses.

Biological sensitivity to family income: Differential effects on early executive functioning

Individual Author: 
Obradovic, Jelena
Portilla, Ximena A.
Ballard, Parissa J.

The study examined how the interplay between children's cortisol response and family income is related to executive function (EF) skills. The sample included one hundred and two 5- to 6-year-olds (64% minority). EF skills were measured using laboratory tasks and observer ratings. Physiological reactivity was assessed via cortisol response during a laboratory visit. A consistent, positive association between family income and EF skills emerged only for children who showed high cortisol response, a marker of biological sensitivity to context.

The American Indian holocaust: Healing historical unresolved grief

Individual Author: 
Brave Heart, Maria Yellow Horse
DeBruyn, Lemyra M.

American Indians experienced massive losses of lives, land, and culture from European contact and colonization resulting in a long legacy of chronic trauma and unresolved grief across generations. This phenomenon, labeled historical unresolved grief, contributes to the current social pathology of high rates of suicide, homicide, domestic violence, child abuse, alcoholism and other social problems among American Indians.

Do effects of early child care extend to age 15 years? Results from the NICHD study of early child care and youth development

Individual Author: 
Lowe Vandell, Deborah
Belsky, Jay
Burchinal, Margaret
Steinberg, Laurence
Vandergrift, Nathan
NICHD Early Child Care Research Network

Relations between nonrelative child care (birth to 4 1/2 years) and functioning at age 15 were examined (N = 1,364). Both quality and quantity of child care were linked to adolescent functioning. Effects were similar in size as those observed at younger ages. Higher quality care predicted higher cognitive-academic achievement at age 15, with escalating positive effects at higher levels of quality. The association between quality and achievement was mediated, in part, by earlier child-care effects on achievement.