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Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (OPRE)

Publisher ID: 
SSRC-DID-0001994

Employment and health among low-income adults and their children: A review of the literature

Individual Author: 
Sama-Miller, Emily
Kleinman, Rebecca
Timmins, Lori
Dahlen, Heather

Decades of research have produced convincing evidence of a strong relationship between having a job and enjoying good health. But does employment cause health outcomes or does health cause employment outcomes? If employment can cause health outcomes, does working make health better or worse?

Supporting employees and maximizing profit: The case for workforce development focused on self-regulation

Individual Author: 
Kauff, Jacqueline F.

This brief was developed under the Goal-Oriented Adult Learning in Self-Sufficiency (GOALS) project on behalf of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE). Under this project, Mathematica Policy Research explored how emerging insights from psychology, neuroscience, behavioral science, and goal achievement can inform workforce development programs for lowincome adults. Several project activities contributed to the development of this brief, including

Improving employment outcomes: Using innovative goal-oriented strategies in TANF programs

Individual Author: 
Derr, Michelle
McCay, Jonathan
Kauff, Jacqueline F.

New evidence from neuroscience, psychology, and other behavioral sciences suggests that TANF programs may be able to improve participants’ outcomes by applying the science of self-regulation. Self-regulation refers to a foundational set of skills and personality factors that enable people to control their thoughts, emotions, and behavior. It is what helps people set goals, make plans, solve problems, reason, organize, prioritize, initiate tasks, manage time, and persist in and monitor their actions.

Implementation and relative impacts of two job search assistance programs in New York City

Individual Author: 
Martinson, Karin
Harvill, Eleanor
Litwok, Daniel
Schwartz, Deena
De La Rosa, Siobhan Mills
Saunders, Correne
Bell, Stephen

This report describes the implementation and impact study findings from an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of two approaches to providing job search assistance (JSA) to cash assistance applicants in New York City. From 2015 to 2016, the New York City Department of Social Services/Human Resources Administration administered two JSA programs for “job ready” cash assistance applicants: Back to Work (known as B2W, the pre-existing program) and Independent Job Search (IJS, a new program).

Supporting the development of self-regulation in young children: Tips for practitioners working with toddlers in classroom settings

Individual Author: 
Pahigiannis, K.
Rosanbalm, K.
Murray, D. W.

Toddlers are rapidly developing movement and language abilities that help them interact with their surroundings. They may go through changes from infant to toddler care settings, or from younger to older toddler childcare rooms, which bring new people, new schedules, and new expectations. Positive relationships with caregivers are essential for cultivating emerging self-regulation skills. This document provides tips to help caregivers use co-regulation to promote self-regulation skill development in toddlers. (Edited author introduction)

 

Supporting the development of self-regulation in young children: Tips for practitioners working with preschool children in classroom settings

Individual Author: 
Pahigiannis, K.
Rosanbalm, K.
Murray, D. W.

The preschool period in a child’s life is full of new experiences, new expectations, and new opportunities to build relationships. Children in this age group have great potential to develop their self-regulation skills with specific instruction, support, and scaffolding from caring adults.This document provides tips to help caregivers use co-regulation to promote self-regulation skill development in preschoolers. (Edited author introduction) 

 

Supporting the development of self-regulation in young children: Tips for practitioners working with infants in classroom settings

Individual Author: 
Pahigiannis, K.
Rosanbalm, K.
Murray, D. W.

The first year of life is a critical time for infants to begin developing secure attachments with their parents and caregivers (secure attachment is when children know they can depend on adults to respond sensitively to their needs). This helps babies learn that their world is a safe place and it is an important foundation for self-regulation development. When babies transition to childcare outside of the home, they need to form relationships with other caregivers and learn through experience that their needs will be met. (Edited author introduction)

 

Supporting the development of self-regulation in young children: Tips for practitioners working with families in home settings

Individual Author: 
Pahigiannis, K.
Rosanbalm, K.
Murray, D. W.

The home environment, including a child’s relationship with parents and primary caregivers, is the biggest influence on a child’s ability to develop self-regulation skills. Home visiting professionals have a unique opportunity to help both the child and parent or caregiver develop self-regulation skills and to help strengthen their relationship. This document provides tips to help home visitors empower caregivers with skills and tools to provide co-regulation support for their child. (Edited author introduction)

 

“We get a chance to show impact": Program staff reflect on participating in a rigorous, multi-site evaluation

Individual Author: 
Hamadyk, Jill
Gardiner, Karen

This brief summarizes the experiences of leaders and staff from eight career pathways programs that participated in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Evaluation. Based on firsthand accounts, the brief describes how staff perceived the benefits of participating in the randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluation, the challenges they experienced—in particular recruiting study participants and implementing its random assignment procedures—and how they overcame challenges. The brief then describes lessons staff learned from participating in PACE.

Participant Perspectives on HPOG 2.0: Design report for in-depth interviews with HPOG 2.0 program participants

Individual Author: 
Thomas, Hannah
Locke, Gretchen
Klerman, Jacob

The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program awards grants to organizations that provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for healthcare occupations that pay well and are in high demand. A National Evaluation of 27 grants awarded in 2015 as part of the second round of HPOG grants (HPOG 2.0) is currently underway. The National Evaluation Descriptive Evaluation will include an interview study of participant experiences in HPOG 2.0.