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Whole family approaches to research and practice: A look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® program PowerPoint

Individual Author: 
Popham, Amelia
Dwyer, Kathleen
Bradford, Janae
Eckrich Sommer, Teresa
Sabol, Terri

On December 3rd, 2018, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm (EST), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  This moderated webinar, presented in partnership with the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOG UP) Research Grants program, provided an indepth look at 2Generation, or “whole family,” approaches to service delivery systems, which weave supports for both parents and children together, with the goal of promoting self-sufficiency for

Whole family approaches to research and practice: A look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® program question and answer document

Individual Author: 
Popham, Amelia
Dwyer, Kathleen
Bradford, Janae
Eckrich Sommer, Teresa
Sabol, Terri

On December 3rd, 2018, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm (EST), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  This moderated webinar, presented in partnership with the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOG UP) Research Grants program, provided an indepth look at 2Generation, or “whole family,” approaches to service delivery systems, which weave supports for both parents and children together, with the goal of promoting self-sufficiency for

Whole family approaches to research and practice: A look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® program transcript

Individual Author: 
Popham, Amelia
Dwyer, Kathleen
Bradford, Janae
Eckrich Sommer, Teresa
Sabol, Terri

On December 3rd, 2018, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm (EST), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  This moderated webinar, presented in partnership with the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOG UP) Research Grants program, provided an indepth look at 2Generation, or “whole family,” approaches to service delivery systems, which weave supports for both parents and children together, with the goal of promoting self-sufficiency for

Child care in poor communities: Early learning effects of type, quality, and stability

Individual Author: 
Loeb, Susanna
Fuller, Bruce
Kagan, Sharon Lynn
Carrol, Bidemi

Young children in poor communities are spending more hours in nonparental care because of policy reforms and expansion of early childhood programs. Studies show positive effects of high-quality center-based care on children's cognitive growth. Yet, little is known about the effects of center care typically available in poor communities or the effects of home-based care. Using a sample of children who were between 12 and 42 months when their mothers entered welfare-to-work programs, this paper finds positive cognitive effects for children in center care.

2017 National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report

Individual Author: 
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

The National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report assesses the performance of our healthcare system and identifies areas of strengths and weaknesses, as well as disparities, for access to healthcare and quality of healthcare. Quality is described in terms of six priorities: patient safety, person-centered care, care coordination, effective treatment, healthy living, and care affordability. The report is based on more than 250 measures of quality and disparities covering a broad array of healthcare services and settings. (Author introduction)

 

How far Americans live from the closest hospital differs by community type

Individual Author: 
Lam, Onyi
Broderick, Brian
Toor, Skye

Rural Americans are more likely than people in urban and suburban areas to say access to good doctors and hospitals is a major problem in their community. Nearly a quarter (23%) of Americans in rural areas say this, compared with 18% of urbanites and 9% of suburbanites, according to a Pew Research Center survey conducted earlier this year. (Edited author introduction)

Access in Brief: Rural and Urban Health Care

Individual Author: 
Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission

Using data combined from the 2013–2015 National Health Interview Surveys, this brief examines characteristics of individuals with Medicaid coverage—children and adults—in rural areas, as well as their access to care and use of services, comparing their experience to their privately insured and uninsured counterparts. We also compare access and use between Medicaid beneficiaries in urban and rural areas, and by disability. (Edited author introduction)

 

Data snapshot: EITC continues to reach families in poor places

Individual Author: 
Schaefer, Andrew
Mattingly, Marybeth J.
Nickerson, Kennedy
Carson, Jessica A.

Recent proposals in the House and Senate (for example, the Grow American Incomes Now Act) focus on amplifying the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC)—a refundable tax credit for low-income workers—to compensate for growing wage inequity. We find that the share of EITC filers who are families with children is especially high in the poorest counties (those counties outlined in black on Map 1), including many places throughout the South.

Beyond the nuclear family: Trends in children living in shared households

Individual Author: 
Pilkauskas, Natasha V.
Cross, Christina

Using data from the 1996–2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation and the 2009–2016 American Community Survey, we examine trends in U.S. children living in shared households (living with adults beyond their nuclear (parent/ parent’s partner/sibling) family). We find that although the share of children who lived in a shared household increased over this period, the rise was nearly entirely driven by an increase in three-generation/multigenerational households (coresident grandparent(s), parent(s), and child).

Child care subsidy programs and child care choices: Effects on the number and type of arrangements

Individual Author: 
Pilarz, Alejandra Ros

Despite strong evidence that stable, high-quality child care promotes young children's development, low-income children are less likely to participate in formal and high-quality care than higher-income children and may be more likely to experience multiple, concurrent arrangements due to parents' economic and employment constraints. Child care subsidy programs increase low-income children's access to formal, center-based care, but little is known as to whether subsidies also influence the use of multiple arrangements.