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Prenatal risk factors and perinatal and postnatal outcomes associated wtih maternal opioid exposure in an urban, low-income multiethnic US population

Individual Author: 
Azuine, Romuladus E.
Ji, Yuelong
Chang, Hsing-Yuan
Kim, Yoona
Ji, Hongkai
DiBari, Jessica
Hong, Xiumei
Wang, Guoying
Singh, Gopal K.
Pearson, Colleen
Zuckerman, Barry
Surkan, Pamela J.
Wang, Xiaobin
Importance: The opioid epidemic increasingly affects pregnant women and developing fetuses, resulting in high rates of neonatal abstinence syndrome. However, longitudinal studies that prospectively observe newborns with neonatal abstinence syndrome or with maternal opioid use and examine their long-term physical and neurodevelopmental outcomes are lacking.
 
Objective: To examine prenatal risk factors associated with maternal opioid use during pregnancy and the short-term and long-term health consequences on their children.

Disparity of SED recovery: Community initiatives to enhance a system of care mental health transformation

Individual Author: 
Grape, Annette
Plum, Kathleen C.
Fielding, Stephen L.

How do youth from various community groups designated as having a serious emotional disturbance (SED) recover over time? We conducted an evaluation of a Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration System of Care grant initiative for Monroe County, New York, to answer this and other questions. We looked at outcome differences over time using the Behavioral and Emotional Ratings Scale’s (2nd ed.) overall strength scores among youth living in four geographical places at the start of services: high-income urban, low-income urban, suburban, and rural.

Can minimum wage increases lead to benefit cliffs? A closer look at SNAP, CHIP, Medicaid, and CCDF eligibility requirements

Individual Author: 
Hartig, Seth

This presentation was given at the 57th National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Workshop in 2019. The presentation provides an overview of the perils of food assistance and other social services benefits cliffs, as well as the results of a study on the effects of minimum wage and inflation on benefit limits. Discrepencies between market rates and subsidies for food, child care, and other needs can cause families to face severe financial circumstances when they reach sharp benefit limits.

America's child care deserts in 2018

Individual Author: 
Malik, Rasheed
Hamm, Katie
Schochet, Leila
Novoa, Cristina
Workman, Simon
Jessen-Howard, Steven

For this report, the Center for American Progress collected and analyzed data on the location and capacity of licensed or registered child care providers in every state and Washington, D.C. These data were synthesized with estimates of the population, family income, and labor force participation rates in every one of the country’s 73,057 census tracts. This original and comprehensive analysis of child care supply at the census tract level finds that 51 percent of Americans live in child care deserts.

Strained suburbs: The social service challenges of rising suburban poverty

Individual Author: 
Allard, Scott W.
Roth, Benjamin

Cities and suburbs occupy well-defined roles within the discussion of poverty, opportunity, and social welfare policy in metropolitan America. Research exploring issues of poverty typically has focused on central-city neighborhoods, where poverty and joblessness have been most concentrated. As a result, place-based U.S. antipoverty policies focus primarily on ameliorating concentrated poverty in inner-city (and, in some cases, rural) areas.

How do sprawl and inequality affect well-being in American cities?

Individual Author: 
Lee, Wen Hao
Ambrey, Christopher
Pojani, Dorina

This study investigates whether income inequality is related to sprawl and wellbeing in American cities. The results do not provide evidence to support the role of income inequality as a mediator of the link between sprawl and well-being. Instead, the results tell a more nuanced story. Specifically, they indicate that consistent with a priori expectations, lower levels of sprawl are, on average, associated with lower levels of income inequality. Additionally, lower levels of sprawl correspond to higher levels of financial well-being.

Lessons learned from a community-based participatory research mental health promotion program for American Indian youth

Individual Author: 
Langdon, Sarah E.
Golden, Shannon L.
Arnold, Elizabeth Mayfield
Maynor, Rhonda F.
Bryant, Alfred
Freeman, V. Kay
Bell, Ronny A.

Background. American Indian (AI) youth have the highest rates of suicide among racial/ethnic minority groups in the United States. Community-based strategies are essential to address this issue, and community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers a model to engage AI communities in mental health promotion programming. Objectives.

Relief from government-owed child support debt and its effects on parents and children

Individual Author: 
Hahn, Heather
Kuehn, Daniel
Hassani, Hannah
Edin, Kathryn

This report was updated on August 28, 2019. On page vi, the share of child support payments in California that is owed to the government was changed from 70 percent to 40 percent to reflect the most recent data. On page 2, “In San Francisco” was changed to “According to the San Francisco Department of Child Support Services” to clarify the source of the percentage in the first paragraph. (author abstract)

Parenting in poverty: Attention bias and anxiety interact to predict parents’ perceptions of daily parenting hassles

Individual Author: 
Finegood, Eric D.
Raver, C. Cybele
DeJoseph, Meriah L.
Blair, Clancy

Research has long acknowledged the centrality of parents’ subjective experiences in the caregiving role for the organization of parenting behaviors and family functioning. Recent scientific advances in cognitive process models and in the neurobiology of parenting indicate that parenting is shaped in part by conscious and nonconscious cognitive processes.

Adverse childhood experiences, poverty, and parenting stress

Individual Author: 
Steele, Howard
Bate, Jordan
Steele, Miriam
Rishi Dube, Shanta
Danskin, Kerri
Knafo, Hannah
Nikitiades, Adella
Bonuck, Karen
Meissner, Paul
Murphy, Anne

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with physical and mental health problems in adulthood, as well as unresolved or discordant states of mind regarding attachments that have implications for problematic parenting. Currently, there are no studies on the association between ACEs and adults’ subjective experiences of stress in the parenting role, where socioeconomic status (SES)!related poverty effects have been controlled for—the central question behind the current study.