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Employment coaching: Working with low-income populations to use self-regulation skills to achieve employment goals

Individual Author: 
Joyce, Kristen
McConnell, Sheena

New research has led policymakers and researchers to argue that some people might not achieve economic independence in part because of difficulty applying the self-regulation skills needed to get, keep, and advance in a job (Pavetti 2018; Cavadel et al. 2017). These self-regulation skills—sometimes referred to as soft skills or executive functioning skills—include the ability to finish tasks, stay organized, and control emotions.

The intersection of low-wage work and public assistance: Workers’ experiences in Minnesota

Individual Author: 
Coffey, Amelia
Hahn, Heather
Park, Yuju

This is a qualitative study of low-wage workers in two Minnesota communities who recently experienced either voluntary or involuntary job separation. The study confronts a false dichotomy that people are either working or on public assistance. The study analyzes workers’ experiences in low-wage, unstable jobs, reasons for separating from jobs, and the roles public assistance and other supports play in their lives. The study offers key insights from workers themselves on how jobs and assistance programs may be improved to help them achieve greater stability and economic security.

Long-term effects of parenting-focused preventive interventions to promote resilience of children and adolescents

Individual Author: 
Sandler, Irwin
Ingram, Alexandra
Wolchik, Sharlene
Tein, Jenn-Yun
Winslow, Emily

In this article, we address three questions concerning the long-term effects of parenting-focused preventive interventions: 1) Do prevention programs promote effective parenting in families facing normative stressors as well as those facing frequent adversity? 2) Do parenting programs prevent children’s long-term problems? 3) Do changes in parenting mediate long-term effects of programs? We address these questions by summarizing evidence from 22 programs with randomized trials and followups of three years or longer.

Resilience in children: Developmental perspectives

Individual Author: 
Masten, Ann S.
Barnes, Andrew J.

Advances in developmental resilience science are highlighted with commentary on implications for pediatric systems that aspire to promote healthy development over the life course. Resilience science is surging along with growing concerns about the consequences of adverse childhood experiences on lifelong development. Resilience is defined as the capacity of a system to adapt successfully to challenges that threaten the function, survival, or future development of the system.

Resilience of children with refugee statuses: A research review

Individual Author: 
Pieloch, Kerrie A.
Marks, Amy K.
McCullough, Mary Beth

Over the past several decades, an increasing number of refugee children and families have involuntarily migrated to countries around the world to seek safety and refuge. As the refugee population increases, it is becoming more important to understand factors that promote and foster resilience among refugee youth. The present review examines the past 20 years of resilience research with refugee children to identify individual, family, school, community, and societal factors fostering resilience.

Maternal monitoring knowledge change and adolescent externalizing behaviors in low-income African American and Latino families

Individual Author: 
Chang, Tzu-Fen
Baolian Qin, Desiree

Drawing on a sample of 318 African American and 354 Latino urban, low-income families, we identify maternal monitoring knowledge trajectories and examine which trajectory predicts fewer late-adolescent externalizing problems and which family and neighborhood factors predict trajectories with positive implications for lateadolescent externalizing behaviors. The majority of adolescents in both groups perceived long-term high levels of maternal monitoring knowledge throughout adolescence—stably high for the African American sample and high for the Latino sample.

Strong at the broken places: The resiliency of low-income parents

Individual Author: 
Wilson-Simmons, Renée
Jiang, Yang
Aratani, Yumiko

Despite the multitude of obstacles that low-income parents face, many of them succeed in helping their children flourish. They raise children who possess the social-emotional competence needed to develop and keep friendships; establish good relationships with parents, teachers, and other adults; and experience a range of achievements that contribute to their selfconfidence, self-esteem, and self-efficacy.

Association of maternal depressive symptoms and offspring physical health in low-income families

Individual Author: 
Thompson, Sarah M.
Jiang, Lu
Hammen, Constance
Whaley, Shannon E.

Objectives The present study sought to examine the association between maternal depressive symptoms and characteristics of offspring physical health, including health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization, among low-income families. Maternal engagement was explored as a mediator of observed effects. Methods Cross-sectional survey data from a community sample of 4589 low-income women and their preschool-age children participating in the WIC program in Los Angeles County were analyzed using logistic, Poisson, and zero-inflated negative binomial regression.

Long-term effects of social-emotional learning on receipt of special education and grade retention: Evidence from a randomized trial of INSIGHTS

Individual Author: 
McCormick, Meghan P.
Neuhaus, Robin
Horn, E. Parham
O'Connor, Erin E.
White, Hope S.
Harding, Samantha
Cappella, Elise
McClowry, Sandee

Social–Emotional Learning (SEL) programs are school-based preventive interventions that aim to improve children’s social–emotional skills and behavioral development. Although meta-analytic research has shown that SEL programs can improve academic and behavioral outcomes in the short term, few studies have examined program effects on receipt of special education services and grade retention in the longer term.

Are Hispanic, Asian, Native American, or language-minority children overrepresented in special education?

Individual Author: 
Morgan, Paul L.
Farkas, George
Cook, Michael
Strassfeld, Natasha M.
Hillemeier, Marianne M.
Pun, Wik Hung
Wang, Yangyang
Schussler, Deborah L.

We conducted a best-evidence synthesis of 22 studies to examine whether systemic bias explained minority disproportionate overrepresentation in special education. Of the total regression model estimates, only 7/168 (4.2%), 14/208 (6.7%), 2/37 (5.4%), and 6/91 (6.6%) indicated statistically significant overrepresentation for Hispanic, Asian, Native American, and English language learner (ELL) or language-minority children, respectively.