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Final implementation findings from the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CPSED) evaluation

Individual Author: 
Cancian, Maria
Meyer, Daniel R.
Wood, Robert

The final implementation report on the National Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) was released on January 15, 2019. It reflects demonstration activities that commenced in fall 2012, when the eight child support agencies competitvely awarded grants by OSCE to participate in CSPED began a one-year planning period, and concluded with the end of the demonstration period in September 2017. 

Characteristics of participants in the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) evaluation

Individual Author: 
Cancian, Maria
Guarin, Angela
Hodges, Leslie
Meyer, Daniel R.

The purpose of this report is to begin to fill in the blanks by documenting the characteristics of more than 10,000 noncustodial parents who participated in the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration program (CSPED).  The federally funded intervention was operated by child support agency grantees within eight eligible states, and served noncustodial parents who were behind on child support payments and experiencing employment difficulties. (Author introduction)

Final impact findings from the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED)

Individual Author: 
Cancian, Maria
Meyer, Daniel R.
Wood, Robert G.

The final impact report on the National Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) was released on March 14, 2019. The primary goal of the intervention was to improve the reliable payment of child support in order to improve child well-being and avoid public costs. Key outcomes related to noncustodial parents' (1) child support orders, payments and compliance, as well as attitudes toward the child support program; (2) work and earnings; (3) sense of responsibility for their children.

Does joint legal custody increase child support for nonmarital children?

Individual Author: 
Chen, Yiyu
Meyer, Daniel R.

Nonmarital children account for two fifths of births in the US, and close to two thirds of these children do not live with their fathers by age five. Although nonmarital children primarily live with their mothers, joint legal custody has emerged as an option for their parents. Parents with joint legal custody are expected to make major decisions for their child together, regardless of their prior marital status.

Building connections: Using integrated administrative data to identify issues and solutions spanning the child welfare and child support systems

Individual Author: 
Howard, Lanikque
Vogel, Lisa Klein
Cancian, Maria
Noyes, Jennifer L.

We analyze the role of newly integrated data from the child support and child welfare systems in seeding a major policy change in Wisconsin. Parents are often ordered to pay child support to offset the costs of their children’s stay in foster care. Policy allows for consideration of the “best interests of the child.” Concerns that charging parents could delay or disrupt reunification motivated our analyses of integrated data to identify the impacts of current policy. We summarize the results of the analyses and then focus on the role of administrative data in supporting policy development.

“We get a chance to show impact": Program staff reflect on participating in a rigorous, multi-site evaluation

Individual Author: 
Hamadyk, Jill
Gardiner, Karen

This brief summarizes the experiences of leaders and staff from eight career pathways programs that participated in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Evaluation. Based on firsthand accounts, the brief describes how staff perceived the benefits of participating in the randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluation, the challenges they experienced—in particular recruiting study participants and implementing its random assignment procedures—and how they overcame challenges. The brief then describes lessons staff learned from participating in PACE.

Hunger in higher education: Experiences and correlates of food insecurity among Wisconsin undergraduates from low-income families

Individual Author: 
Broton, Katharine M.
Weaver, Kari E.
Mai, Minhtuyen

There is growing awareness that a substantial share of undergraduates are food insecure, potentially undermining investments in higher education and hindering upward social mobility. This mixed-methods paper uses survey and interview data from low-income students at 42 public colleges and universities in Wisconsin to illuminate the day-to-day experiences of food insecurity and examine how food security status varies across background characteristics.

Findings from in-depth interviews with participants in subsidized employment programs

Individual Author: 
Fink, Barbara

Subsidized employment and transitional jobs programs seek to increase employment and earnings among individuals who have not been able to find employment on their own. First-hand accounts of participants’ experiences in these programs can inform efforts to improve long-term employment outcomes for various “hard-to-employ” populations.

Federal and local efforts to support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness

Individual Author: 
Knas, Emily
Stagner, Matthew
Bradley, M.C.

The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

Developing American Job Centers in jails: Implementation of the Linking to Employment Activities Pre-Release (LEAP) grants

Individual Author: 
Bellotti, Jeanne
Sattar, Samina
Gould-Werth, Alix
Berk, Jillian
Gutierrez, Ivette
Stein, Jillian
Betesh, Hannah
Ochoa, Lindsay
Wiegand, Andrew

To help individuals successfully reenter society after time in jail, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded $10 million in grants to 20 local workforce development boards (LWDBs) in June 2015 for the Linking to Employment Activities PreRelease (LEAP) initiative. Central to the LEAP initiative was creating jail-based American Job Centers (AJCs) with direct linkages to community-based AJCs.