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Basic facts about low-income children: Children aged 6 through 11 years, 2013

Individual Author: 
Jiang, Yang
Ekono, Mercedes
Skinner, Curtis

Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 33 percent of all people in poverty. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (22 percent) live in poor families. Similarly, among children in middle childhood (age 6 through 11 years), 45 percent live in low-income families and 22 percent live in poor families. Being a child in a low-income or poor family does not happen by chance.

Basic facts about low-income children: Children under 3 years, 2014

Individual Author: 
Jiang, Yang
Ekono, Mercedes
Skinner, Curtis

Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 32 percent of all people in poverty. Many more children live in families with incomes just above the poverty threshold. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (21 percent) live in poor families. Our very youngest children—infants and toddlers under age 3 years—appear to be particularly vulnerable, with 47 percent living in low-income families, including 24 percent living in poor families.

Basic facts about low-income children: Children aged 12 through 17 years, 2014

Individual Author: 
Jiang, Yang
Ekono, Mercedes
Skinner, Curtis

Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 32 percent of all people in poverty. Many more children live in families with incomes just above the poverty threshold. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (21 percent) live in poor families. Among our oldest children, adolescents age 12 through 17 years, 40 percent live in low-income families and 19 percent live in poor families. Being a child in a low-income or poor family does not happen by chance.

Basic facts about low-income children: Children under 18 years, 2014

Individual Author: 
Jiang, Yang
Ekono, Mercedes
Skinner, Curtis

Children under 18 years represent 23 percent of the population, but they comprise 32 percent of all people in poverty. Many more children live in families with incomes just above the poverty threshold. Among all children, 44 percent live in low-income families and approximately one in every five (21 percent) live in poor families. Being a child in a low-income or poor family does not happen by chance. Parental education and employment, race/ethnicity, and other factors are associated with children’s experience of economic insecurity.

Parents and Children Together: The complex needs of low-income men and how responsible fatherhood programs address them

Individual Author: 
Dion, Robin
Holcomb, Pamela
Zaveri, Heather
D'Angelo, Angela Valdovinos
Clary, Elizabeth
Friend, Daniel
Baumgartner, Scott

Broad changes in family demographics have left many children without the support or involvement of their fathers. As a result of high rates of nonmarital births and divorce, millions of American children do not live with both of their parents. Rates of nonresidence are particularly high among groups that tend to face more economic challenges: 58 percent of black children and 31 percent of Hispanic children were living without their biological fathers in 2012.

Evaluation of Demonstration Projects to End Childhood Hunger: Final interim evaluation report

Individual Author: 
Briefel, Ronette
Melia, Micah
Harvey, Bonnie
Forrestal, Sarah
Chojnacki, Gregory
Caronongan, Pia
Gothro, Andrew
Cabili, Charlotte
Kleinman, Rebecca
Gabor, Vivian
Redel, Nicholas
Gleason, Philip

This study—authorized by the 2010 Child Nutrition Act—tests innovative strategies to end childhood hunger and food insecurity. The interim evaluation report describes (1) the demonstration projects, (2) planning and early implementation activities, and (3) findings from the baseline data collection for four projects located within Chickasaw Nation, Kentucky, Nevada, and Virginia. A fifth demonstration project was implemented in Navajo Nation but not evaluated due to changes in program design. The demonstrations occurred during 2015-2017 and operated for 12 to 24 months.

Discrimination against families with children in rental housing markets: Findings of the pilot study

Individual Author: 
Aron, Laudan
Aranda, Claudia
Wissoker, Douglas
Howell, Brent
Santos, Robert
Scott, Molly
Turner, Margery Austin

This pilot study adapted a well-established paired-testing methodology to examine discrimination against families with children in the rental housing market, developed preliminary estimates of this form of discrimination, and explored what family or housing characteristics might affect it. Data were collected via telephone and in-person paired tests in three metropolitan sites: Dallas, Texas; Dayton, Ohio; and Los Angeles, California. The pilot study relied on a multifactor design using data from 612 matched pairs of rental applicants.

Strengthening communities with neighborhood data

Individual Author: 
Kingsley, G. Thomas
Coulton, Claudia J.
Pettit, Kathryn L.S.

Efforts to address the problems of distressed urban neighborhoods stretch back to the 1800s, but until relatively recently, data played little role in forming policy. It wasn’t until the early 1990s that all the factors necessary for rigorous, multifaceted analysis of neighborhood conditions—automated government records, geospatial information systems, and local organizations that could leverage both—converged. Strengthening Communities documents that convergence and details its progress, plotting the ways data are improving local governance in America. (Author abstract)  

Concentrated poverty increased in both rural and urban areas since 2000, reversing declines in the 1990s

Individual Author: 
Thiede, Brian C
Kim, Hyojung
Valasik, Matthew

The number of nonmetropolitan counties with high poverty rates increased between the 2000 Decennial Census and 2011–2015 (hereafter 2013) American Community Survey (ACS), and so did the share of the rural population residing in these disadvantaged areas. Over this time period, the percentage of rural counties with poverty rates of 20 percent or more increased from a fifth to nearly one-third, and the share of the rural population living in these places nearly doubled to over 31 percent.

Maternal employment stability in early childhood: Links with child behavior and cognitive skills

Individual Author: 
Pilkauskas, Natasha V.
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Waldfogel, Jane

Although many studies have investigated links between maternal employment and children's wellbeing, less research has considered whether the stability of maternal employment is linked with child outcomes. Using unique employment calendar data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N=2,011), an urban birth cohort study of largely low-income families, this paper investigates whether the stability of maternal employment in early childhood (birth to age 5) is linked with child behavior and cognitive skills at ages 5 and 9.