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Final implementation findings from the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CPSED) evaluation

Individual Author: 
Cancian, Maria
Meyer, Daniel R.
Wood, Robert

The final implementation report on the National Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) was released on January 15, 2019. It reflects demonstration activities that commenced in fall 2012, when the eight child support agencies competitvely awarded grants by OSCE to participate in CSPED began a one-year planning period, and concluded with the end of the demonstration period in September 2017. 

Characteristics of participants in the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) evaluation

Individual Author: 
Cancian, Maria
Guarin, Angela
Hodges, Leslie
Meyer, Daniel R.

The purpose of this report is to begin to fill in the blanks by documenting the characteristics of more than 10,000 noncustodial parents who participated in the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration program (CSPED).  The federally funded intervention was operated by child support agency grantees within eight eligible states, and served noncustodial parents who were behind on child support payments and experiencing employment difficulties. (Author introduction)

Final impact findings from the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED)

Individual Author: 
Cancian, Maria
Meyer, Daniel R.
Wood, Robert G.

The final impact report on the National Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) was released on March 14, 2019. The primary goal of the intervention was to improve the reliable payment of child support in order to improve child well-being and avoid public costs. Key outcomes related to noncustodial parents' (1) child support orders, payments and compliance, as well as attitudes toward the child support program; (2) work and earnings; (3) sense of responsibility for their children.

Early math trajectories: Low-income children’s mathematics knowledge from ages 4 to 11

Individual Author: 
Rittle-Johnson, Bethany
Hofer, Kerry G.
Fyfe, Emily R.
Farran, Dale C.

Early mathematics knowledge is a strong predictor of later academic achievement, but children from low-income families enter school with weak mathematics knowledge. An early math trajectories model is proposed and evaluated within a longitudinal study of 517 low-income American children from ages 4 to 11. This model includes a broad range of math topics, as well as potential pathways from preschool to middle grades mathematics achievement. In preschool, nonsymbolic quantity, counting, and patterning knowledge predicted fifth-grade mathematics achievement.

Precision in measurement: Using state-level Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families administrative records and the Transfer Income Model (TRIM3) to evaluate poverty measurement

Individual Author: 
Shantz, Kathryn
Fox, Liana E.

Policy leaders look to quality data and statistics to help inform and guide programmatic decisions. As a result, assessing the quality and validity of major household surveys in capturing accurate program participation is essential. One method for evaluating survey quality is to compare self-reported program participation in surveys to administrative records from the program itself. In this paper, we are interested in understanding two issues.

Striving for independence: Two-year impact findings from the Youth Villages Transitional Living Evaluation

Individual Author: 
Valentine, Erin Jacobs
Skemer, Melanie

The Youth Villages program sought an independent evaluation of its Transitional Living program — now known as “YVLifeSet” — which is one example of an “independent living” program. The Transitional Living program aims to help young men and women make the transition to adulthood by providing intensive, individualized, and clinically focused case management, support, and counseling.

Leading the way: Characteristics and early experiences of selected Early Head Start programs. Volume II: Program profiles

Individual Author: 
Berlin, Lisa J.
Kisker, Ellen Eliason
Love, John M.
Raikes, Helen
Boller, Kimberly
Paulsell, Diane
Rosenberg, Linda
Coolahan, Kathleen

This volume and its companion volumes are the first of two reports designed to share the experiences of the 17 Early Head Start research programs with others. The first report focuses on the programs early in their implementation (fall 1997), approximately two years after they were funded and one year after they began serving families. Volume I examines the characteristics and experiences of the 17 research programs from a cross-site perspective, focusing on the similarities and differences among the programs in fall 1997.

SNAP E&T and WIOA: Partnering to raise skills and employment

Individual Author: 
Strawn, Julie

SNAP E&T and State and local workforce agencies share a common goal of helping low-income individuals gain the skills necessary to qualify for jobs leading to self-sufficiency. A March 2016 joint letter issued by the Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) and the Department of Labor’s (DOL) Employment and Training Administration (ETA) encouraged SNAP and the workforce system to collaborate on shared strategies that connect SNAP participants to employment and training services through American Job Centers (AJCs).