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Final implementation findings from the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CPSED) evaluation

Individual Author: 
Cancian, Maria
Meyer, Daniel R.
Wood, Robert

The final implementation report on the National Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) was released on January 15, 2019. It reflects demonstration activities that commenced in fall 2012, when the eight child support agencies competitvely awarded grants by OSCE to participate in CSPED began a one-year planning period, and concluded with the end of the demonstration period in September 2017. 

Characteristics of participants in the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) evaluation

Individual Author: 
Cancian, Maria
Guarin, Angela
Hodges, Leslie
Meyer, Daniel R.

The purpose of this report is to begin to fill in the blanks by documenting the characteristics of more than 10,000 noncustodial parents who participated in the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration program (CSPED).  The federally funded intervention was operated by child support agency grantees within eight eligible states, and served noncustodial parents who were behind on child support payments and experiencing employment difficulties. (Author introduction)

Final impact findings from the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED)

Individual Author: 
Cancian, Maria
Meyer, Daniel R.
Wood, Robert G.

The final impact report on the National Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration (CSPED) was released on March 14, 2019. The primary goal of the intervention was to improve the reliable payment of child support in order to improve child well-being and avoid public costs. Key outcomes related to noncustodial parents' (1) child support orders, payments and compliance, as well as attitudes toward the child support program; (2) work and earnings; (3) sense of responsibility for their children.

Improving the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices in adolescent reproductive health care services

Individual Author: 
Romero, Lisa M.
Middleton, Dawn
Mueller, Trisha
Avellino, Lia
Hallum-Montes, Rachel

Purpose: The purposes of the study were to describe baseline data in the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices among health center partners as part of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative and to identify opportunities for health center improvement.

The impact of WIC on breastfeeding initiation and gestational weight gain: Case study of South Carolina Medicaid mothers

Individual Author: 
Sonchak, Lyudmyla

In this study, we estimate the effect of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infant and Children (WIC) on breastfeeding initiation at hospital discharge and gestational weight gain, by relying on South Carolina birth certificates data for 2004–2013. The unique longitudinal feature of the data allows us to utilize maternal fixed effects to account for non-random selection into WIC. Contrary to the existing evidence, we find that WIC participation does not have a negative effect on breastfeeding initiation. We uncover an important heterogeneity in WIC's effect by race.

Taking care of mine: Can child support become a family-building institution?

Individual Author: 
Edin, Kathryn
Nelson, Timothy J.
Butler, Rachel
Francis, Robert

U.S. children are more likely to live apart from a biological parent than at any time in history. Although the Child Support Enforcement system has tremendous reach, its policies have not kept pace with significant economic, demographic, and cultural changes. Narrative analysis of in-depth interviews with 429 low-income noncustodial fathers suggests that the system faces a crisis of legitimacy. Visualization of language used to describe all forms child support show that the formal system is considered punitive and to lead to a loss of power and autonomy.

Unemployment insurance non-monetary policies and practices: How do they affect program participation? A study of 8 states

Individual Author: 
Farrell, Mary
Fishman, Michael E.
Gardiner, Karen N.
Barnow, Burt
Trutko, Jon

The Department of Labor (DOL) funded this study to explore the relationship between nonmonetary eligibility policies and practices and program outcomes, such as recipiency and benefit duration. This report provides an examination of the factors that appear to affect program outcomes in eight states: Four “high recipiency” states (Delaware, Maine, Pennsylvania, Washington) and four “low recipiency” ones (Arizona, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah).

Leading the way: Characteristics and early experiences of selected Early Head Start programs. Volume II: Program profiles

Individual Author: 
Berlin, Lisa J.
Kisker, Ellen Eliason
Love, John M.
Raikes, Helen
Boller, Kimberly
Paulsell, Diane
Rosenberg, Linda
Coolahan, Kathleen

This volume and its companion volumes are the first of two reports designed to share the experiences of the 17 Early Head Start research programs with others. The first report focuses on the programs early in their implementation (fall 1997), approximately two years after they were funded and one year after they began serving families. Volume I examines the characteristics and experiences of the 17 research programs from a cross-site perspective, focusing on the similarities and differences among the programs in fall 1997.

Diversity and inclusion in apprenticeship expansion: Lessons from South Carolina

Individual Author: 
Kuehn, Daniel

This brief examines the effect of South Carolina’s “Apprenticeship Carolina” expansion initiative on the diversity of newly registered apprentice cohorts. Apprenticeship Carolina had no impact on people of color’s share of new apprenticeship positions, but dramatically increased women’s representation in apprenticeship. The growth in women’s participation is largely the result of the expansion of apprenticeship into occupations that traditionally employ women. These experiences are useful for guiding current and proposed federal expansion policies.

SNAP E&T and WIOA: Partnering to raise skills and employment

Individual Author: 
Strawn, Julie

SNAP E&T and State and local workforce agencies share a common goal of helping low-income individuals gain the skills necessary to qualify for jobs leading to self-sufficiency. A March 2016 joint letter issued by the Department of Agriculture’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) and the Department of Labor’s (DOL) Employment and Training Administration (ETA) encouraged SNAP and the workforce system to collaborate on shared strategies that connect SNAP participants to employment and training services through American Job Centers (AJCs).