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Pathways to high-quality jobs for young adults PowerPoint

Individual Author: 
Abner, Kristin
Anderson Moore, Kristin
Murphy, Kelly
Ross, Martha
McGuire, Patricia

On June 12, 2019, from 2:00 to 3:30 pm (EDT), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults.  The webinar explored: (1) which job characteristics are relevant to measuring job quality, (2) how education, training, and work-related experiences across the lifespan may contribute to job quality at age 29, and (3) the ways in which interventions and policies can support youth from disadvantaged backgrounds to gain higher quality jobs.

Pathways to high-quality jobs for young adults question and answer document

Individual Author: 
Abner, Kristin
Anderson Moore, Kristin
Murphy, Kelly
Ross, Martha
McGuire, Patricia

On June 12, 2019, from 2:00 to 3:30 pm (EDT), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults.  The webinar explored: (1) which job characteristics are relevant to measuring job quality, (2) how education, training, and work-related experiences across the lifespan may contribute to job quality at age 29, and (3) the ways in which interventions and policies can support youth from disadvantaged backgrounds to gain higher quality jobs.

Pathways to high-quality jobs for young adults transcript

Individual Author: 
Abner, Kristin
Anderson Moore, Kristin
Murphy, Kelly
Ross, Martha
McGuire, Patricia

On June 12, 2019, from 2:00 to 3:30 pm (EDT), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Pathways to High-Quality Jobs for Young Adults.  The webinar explored: (1) which job characteristics are relevant to measuring job quality, (2) how education, training, and work-related experiences across the lifespan may contribute to job quality at age 29, and (3) the ways in which interventions and policies can support youth from disadvantaged backgrounds to gain higher quality jobs.

Skill, career, and wage mobility among refugees: Understanding refugee's transitions into higher-skill, higher-wage work as a lens to inform effective workforce development policies in the US

Individual Author: 
Bouris, Erica

This presentation draws on: 1) administrative program data collected from over 700 individuals participating in International Rescue Committee career programs (workforce development programs that are explicitly focused on supporting refugees – regardless of previous professional experience or educational background – to move into higher-skill, higher-wage jobs); 2) in-depth, semi-structured interviews with more than 40 refugees from nearly a dozen countries that have participated in International Rescue Committee career programs and; 3) interviews with nearly 20 program staff and key

Set up to fail: When low-wage work jeopardizes parents’ and children’s success

Individual Author: 
Vogtman, Julie
Schulman, Karen

Every day, working parents in low-wage jobs are desperate to keep food on the table and a roof over their families’ heads, and to provide a better life for their children. Yet, even when they work full time, they may not earn enough to lift their children out of poverty. They often have unpredictable work hours over which they have little control, making it difficult to arrange child care or manage other family responsibilities. And when they must miss work to meet the demands that all parents face—sick children, doctors’ appointments, parent-teacher conferences—their jobs may be at risk.

Predicting repeated and persistent family homelessness: Do families’ characteristics and experiences matter?

Individual Author: 
Glendening, Zachary
Shinn, Marybeth

Research indicates that most families using emergency shelters stay briefly—one to four or five months—and rarely return (Culhane et al. 2007). However, some families remain homeless for long periods of time or experience repeated episodes of homelessness. These families may have characteristics and service needs that differ from those of families who leave shelter quickly and permanently. Communities and homelessness practitioners might benefit from identifying those families’ characteristics and experiences to improve targeting of services.

Homeless families’ experiences with public benefit programs, employment, and family transitions

Individual Author: 
Benton, Amanda
Dunton, Lauren
Khadduri, Jill
Walton, Douglas

These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S.

Behavioral health improvements over time among adults in families experiencing homelessness

Individual Author: 
Shinn, Marybeth
Gubits, Daniel
Dunton, Lauren

The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS.