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Skill, career, and wage mobility among refugees: Understanding refugee's transitions into higher-skill, higher-wage work as a lens to inform effective workforce development policies in the US

Individual Author: 
Bouris, Erica

This presentation draws on: 1) administrative program data collected from over 700 individuals participating in International Rescue Committee career programs (workforce development programs that are explicitly focused on supporting refugees – regardless of previous professional experience or educational background – to move into higher-skill, higher-wage jobs); 2) in-depth, semi-structured interviews with more than 40 refugees from nearly a dozen countries that have participated in International Rescue Committee career programs and; 3) interviews with nearly 20 program staff and key

Supporting healthy marriages among fathers with histories of incarceration: Activities and lessons learned from six Responsible Fatherhood programs

Individual Author: 
Fontaine, Jocelyn
Eisenstat, Josh
Cramer, Lindsey

The Fatherhood Reentry projects provided activities to fathers (and their families) in institutional settings as they were nearing release (“prerelease”) and in their offices located in the community (“postrelease”). All six projects provided services in multiple institutional settings: federal prisons (KISRA), state prisons (KISRA, LSS, NJDOC, PB&J, RIDGE, and Rubicon), county/regional jails (KISRA, PB&J, RIDGE, and Rubicon), and residential substance abuse treatment facilities (Rubicon).

Encouraging responsible parenting among fathers with histories of incarceration: Activities and lessons from six Responsible Fatherhood programs

Individual Author: 
Fontaine, Jocelyn
Cramer, Lindsey
Paddock, Ellen

The Fatherhood Reentry projects provided activities to fathers (and their families) in institutional settings as they were nearing release (“prerelease”) and in their offices located in the community (“postrelease”). All six projects provided services in multiple institutional settings: federal prisons (KISRA), state prisons (KISRA, LSS, NJDOC, PB&J, RIDGE, and Rubicon), county/regional jails (KISRA, PBandJ, RIDGE, and Rubicon), and residential substance abuse treatment facilities (Rubicon).

Promoting the economic stability of fathers with histories of incarceration: Activities and lessons from six Responsible Fatherhood programs

Individual Author: 
Fontaine, Jocelyn
Kurs, Emma

With funding from the Office of Family Assistance (OFA), the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation contracted with the Urban Institute to conduct an implementation evaluation of OFA’s Community-Centered Responsible Fatherhood Ex-Prisoner Reentry Pilot Projects (“Fatherhood Reentry”). Six organizations were funded to implement a range of activities intended to help stabilize fathers and their families, help move fathers toward economic self sufficiency, and reduce recidivism.

Final implementation findings from the Responsible Fatherhood Reentry Projects

Individual Author: 
Fontaine, Jocelyn
Cramer, Lindsey
Kurs, Emma
Paddock, Ellen
Eisenstat, Josh
Levy, Jeremy
Hussemann, Jeanette

The evaluation of the Community-Centered Responsible Fatherhood Ex-Prisoner Reentry Pilot Projects (“Fatherhood Reentry”) documented the implementation of six programs designed to help stabilize fathers and their families, help move fathers toward economic self-sufficiency, and reduce recidivism. This report presents the findings from the evaluation and provides an overview of the activities implemented by the programs, describes their various approaches to implementation, and identifies the implementation challenges they faced and the solutions they used to overcome those challenges.

What does government spend on children? Evidence from five cities

Individual Author: 
Weitzman, Bruce
Brecher, Charles
Searcy, Cynthia
Silver, Diana

This report analyzes expenditures by all levels of government for services to children in five economically distressed cities-Baltimore, Detroit, Oakland, Philadelphia, and Richmond-from 1997 to 2000. These cities participate in the Urban Health Initiative (UHI), a ten-year Robert Wood Johnson Foundation program aimed at improving health and safety for young people in these cities. The evaluation design includes a fiscal profile of public expenditures on behalf of children in a baseline year (1997) and updates based on data for 2000 and 2004.

How are HOPE VI families faring? Health

Individual Author: 
Harris, Laura E.
Kaye, Deborah R.

The HOPE VI program aims to improve neighborhood conditions by revitalizing distressed public housing communities and assisting residents with moving to better housing in less distressed neighborhoods. In addition to housing, one goal of the HOPE VI program is to address the social and economic needs of the original residents. The HOPE VI Panel Study is tracking the well-being of residents from five sites where relocation began in 2001. Our baseline survey indicated that health--both physical and mental--is a major concern for HOPE VI Panel Study families.

Hope VI panel study: Baseline report

Individual Author: 
Popkin, Susan J.
Levy, Diane K.
Harris, Laura E.
Comey, Jennifer
Cunningham, Mary K.
Buron, Larry

The HOPE VI program is the major federal initiative driving the transformation of distressed public housing developments nationwide. Under HOPE VI, distressed developments are being demolished and replaced with mixed-income housing. Like welfare reform, this transformation offers both the potential to improve the quality of life for low-income households and the risk that an unknown proportion of families may be unable to make a successful transition.

The Hope VI Program-what about the residents?

Individual Author: 
Popkin, Susan J.

During the 1990s, the federal government dramatically changed its policy for housing the poor. Under the new approach, embodied in the $5 billion HOPE VI program begun in 1992, the Department of Housing and Urban Development moved away from providing project-based assistance for poor families and started promoting mixed-income housing and the use of housing subsidies to prevent the concentration of troubled, low-income households.

Intimate partner violence in the Great Recession

Individual Author: 
Schneider, Daniel
Harknett, Kristen
McLanahan, Sara

In the United States, the Great Recession was marked by severe negative shocks to labor market conditions. In this study, we combine longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study with U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data on local area unemployment rates to examine the relationship between adverse labor market conditions and mothers’ experiences of abusive behavior between 2001 and 2010. Unemployment and economic hardship at the household level were positively related to abusive behavior.