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Geographic patterns in disability insurance receipt: Mental disorders in New England

Individual Author: 
Schwabish, Jonathan

This brief examines correlates of DI benefit receipt for people with mental disorders, focusing on the higher rate of receipt in the six New England states. In 2015, 1.8 percent of all 18- to 65-year-olds across the country received DI benefits because of mental disorders. That recipiency rate was markedly higher in Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. The evidence suggests that access to and treatment from the health care system (which tend to be better in New England states) may help people identify their illnesses and contact the DI program and other services.

Connecting justice-involved individuals with health homes at reentry: New York and Rhode Island

Individual Author: 
Spillman, Brenda C.
Clemans-Cope, Lisa
Mallik-Kane, Kamala
Hayes, Emily

Many states have expanded Medicaid eligibility to reach a wider array of vulnerable and historically uninsured populations. While Medicaid cannot pay for medical services provided in prisons or jails, people who are arrested and incarcerated can enroll in Medicaid and become eligible for benefits in the community. Given the high prevalence of mental health issues, substance abuse, and chronic health conditions among criminal justice populations, providing health care services to them could improve public health and public safety outcomes.

A study of the Self-Employment Assistance program: Helping unemployed workers pursue self-employment

Individual Author: 
Weigensberg, Elizabeth
Needels, Karen
Gould-Werth, Alix
Patnaik, Ankita
Lee, Joanne

This report for the Department of Labor examines Self-Employment Assistance (SEA) programs, which help qualifying unemployment insurance recipients set up a business in lieu of seeking a new job. In addition to providing a weekly self-employment allowance, SEA programs typically partnered with other organizations to provide participants with important business development supports, including counseling, mentoring, or training.

Financial services in the Making Connections neighborhoods

Individual Author: 
Woolley, Mark

This report analyzes survey data about the use of financial services by families living in the 10 Making Connections cities across the United States. The report evaluates resident responses by their use of bank services, check cashing services, payday lenders, pawn shops and credit cards, as well as how they would respond to financial emergencies. It correlates how factors such as race/ethnicity, immigrant status, income, employment level, and neighborhood of residence influenced the use of financial services. (Author abstract)

Assessment of food intake, obesity, and health risk among the homeless in Rhode Island

Individual Author: 
Martins, Diane C.
Gorman, Kathleen S.
Miller, Robin J.
Murphy, Leah
Sor, Sekboppa
Martins, Jonah C.
Vecchiarelli, Maria L.

Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between the nutritional status, incidence of food insecurity, and health risk among the homeless population in Rhode Island.

Design and Sample: This correlational study utilized a convenience sample of 319 homeless adults from Rhode Island's largest service agency for the homeless. Information on use of services such as access to emergency foods, shelters, and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) was requested.

Improving the efficiency of delivering work supports for low-income families: Findings from the Work Support Strategies evaluation

Individual Author: 
Hahn, Heather
Isaacs, Julia
Wagner, Jennifer
Forster, Hilary

This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

Work Support Strategies Initiative: 12 lessons on program integration and innovation

Individual Author: 
James, Cemerè

Receipt of public work supports, such as nutrition assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), health insurance under Medicaid, and child care subsidies, can make a critical difference for low-income workers, stabilizing their employment and allowing them to meet their families’ basic needs. They also improve children’s long-term health and educational outcomes. Unfortunately, many families do not get the full package of work support benefits for which they are eligible. In 2011, about four in ten working households eligible for SNAP did not participate.

Study of the TANF application process: Final report

Individual Author: 
Lodewick, Kendra
Botsko, Christopher
Williams, Susan Schreiber
Werner, Alan
Porcari, Diane
Valente, Jesse

The passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) in 1996 dramatically transformed the nation’s primary cash assistance program for low-income families when it created the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Program to replace the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) Program. There is a substantial body of research on some of the major policy changes under TANF, including, for example, increased work requirements, and time limits on program eligibility.

Race/ethnicity, gender, and monitoring socioeconomic gradients in health: A comparison of area-based socioeconomic measures--the Public Health Disparities Geocoding Project

Individual Author: 
Krieger, Nancy
Chen, Jarvis T.
Waterman, Pamela D.
Rehkopf, David H.
Subramanian, S. V.

Use of multilevel frameworks and area-based socioeconomic measures (ABSMs) for public health monitoring can potentially overcome the absence of socioeconomic data in most US public health surveillance systems.