Skip to main content
Back to Top

Portland

Child care and children with special needs: Challenges for low income families

Individual Author: 
Ward, Helen
Morris, Lisa
Atkins, Julie
Harrick, Andela
Morris, Patricia
Oldham, Erin
Reference type: 
Report

This project was a mixed-method, multi-level study of low income families of children with special needs and the system which served them, focusing primarily on child care, employment, and balancing work and family. This approach included an analysis of existing national and state-level data sets, statewide surveys of parents and child care providers, and a field study to look at these issues at the local level in three selected communities in the state of Maine: Portland, Lewiston/Auburn, and Presque Isle.

Service delivery and institutional linkages: Early implementation experiences of Employment Retention and Advancement programs

Individual Author: 
Anderson, Jacquelyn
Martinson, Karin
Reference type: 
Report

Considerable interest exists among state and local welfare departments, workforce investment agencies, community colleges, and other nonprofit community-based service providers to find ways to promote job retention and advancement among employed welfare recipients and other low-wage working families. Little is known, however, about what services are effective. The Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) evaluation, designed to provide more information about what works in this area, is the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind.

The struggle to sustain employment: The effectiveness of the Post-Employment Services Demonstration

Individual Author: 
Rangarajan, Anu
Novak, Tim
Reference type: 
Report

The PESD evaluation had three main objectives: (1) to better understand and characterize the experiences of individuals after they become employed and to examine the factors contributing to job loss or job stability, (2) to examine the feasibility of providing services to newly employed welfare recipients and to study issues related to service delivery, and (3) to determine whether postemployment services can help individuals keep their jobs longer or regain employment more quickly after job loss.

Transit access analysis of TANF recipients in the city of Portland, Oregon

Individual Author: 
Sanchez, Thomas W.
Reference type: 
Journal Article

Little evidence exists regarding the relationship between transit service availability and the; ability of welfare recipients to find stable employment. While policy-makers continue to assert; that increased public transit mobility can positively affect employment status, there is little; empirical evidence to support this theory. It is generally assumed that public transit can; effectively link unemployed, car-less, persons with appropriate job locations.

Transit mobility, jobs access and low-income labour participation in US metropolitan areas

Individual Author: 
Sanchez, Thomas W.
Shen, Qing
Peng, Zhong-Ren
Reference type: 
Journal Article

While policy-makers assert that increased public transit mobility can positively affect employment status for low-income persons, there is little empirical evidence to support this theory. It is generally assumed that public transit can effectively link unemployed, car-less, persons with appropriate job locations—hence the call for more public transit services to assist moving welfare recipients to gainful employment. Thus far, the available evidence is anecdotal, while general patterns of transit access in relationship to labour participation remain relatively unexplored.