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Whole family approaches to research and practice: A look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® program PowerPoint

Individual Author: 
Popham, Amelia
Dwyer, Kathleen
Bradford, Janae
Eckrich Sommer, Teresa
Sabol, Terri

On December 3rd, 2018, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm (EST), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  This moderated webinar, presented in partnership with the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOG UP) Research Grants program, provided an indepth look at 2Generation, or “whole family,” approaches to service delivery systems, which weave supports for both parents and children together, with the goal of promoting self-sufficiency for

Whole family approaches to research and practice: A look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® program question and answer document

Individual Author: 
Popham, Amelia
Dwyer, Kathleen
Bradford, Janae
Eckrich Sommer, Teresa
Sabol, Terri

On December 3rd, 2018, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm (EST), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  This moderated webinar, presented in partnership with the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOG UP) Research Grants program, provided an indepth look at 2Generation, or “whole family,” approaches to service delivery systems, which weave supports for both parents and children together, with the goal of promoting self-sufficiency for

Whole family approaches to research and practice: A look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® program transcript

Individual Author: 
Popham, Amelia
Dwyer, Kathleen
Bradford, Janae
Eckrich Sommer, Teresa
Sabol, Terri

On December 3rd, 2018, from 2:30 to 4:00 pm (EST), the Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) hosted a free webinar entitled Whole Family Approaches to Research and Practice: A Look at CAP Tulsa’s 2Gen CareerAdvance® Program.  This moderated webinar, presented in partnership with the Health Profession Opportunity Grants University Partnership (HPOG UP) Research Grants program, provided an indepth look at 2Generation, or “whole family,” approaches to service delivery systems, which weave supports for both parents and children together, with the goal of promoting self-sufficiency for

Federal and local efforts to support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness

Individual Author: 
Knas, Emily
Stagner, Matthew
Bradley, M.C.

The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

An institutional analysis of American Job Centers: AJC service delivery in rural areas

Individual Author: 
Betesh, Hannah

To systematically document key characteristics and features of American Job Centers (AJCs), Mathematica and its partners—Social Policy Research Associates, The George Washington University, and Capital Research Corporation—conducted the Institutional Analysis of AJCs for the U.S. Department of Labor. This paper discusses key features and experiences of 12 AJCs that are located in rural areas. The research focuses on AJCs as the unit of service delivery, which is a narrower focus than prior studies of the rural workforce system as a whole.

Lessons from a federal initiative to build capacity to end youth homelessness

Individual Author: 
Klein Vogel, Lisa
Bradley, M. C.

This brief discusses the capacity strategy associated with "The Framework to End Youth Homelessness: A Resource Text for Dialogue and Action," (USICH, 2013) (herafter referred to as the “Framework”) and how the strategy was implemented by YARH Phase I grantees (Figure 1). This framework expanded on the 2010 strategic plan, “Opening Doors,” which was geared toward preventing homelessness among multiple populations (USICH, 2010). The 2013 framework targets the specific challenges and needs of homeless adolescents as they transition to adulthood.

Reducing homelessness among youth with child welfare involvement: An analysis of phase I planning processes in a multi-phase grant

Individual Author: 
Stagner, Matthew
Vogel, Lisa Klein
Knas, Emily
Fung, Nickie
Worthington, Julie
Bradley, M. C.
D'Angelo, Angela
Gothro, Andrew
Powers, Courtney

Youth and young adults with child welfare involvement face significant challenges in their transition to adulthood—challenges that increase their risk of becoming homeless. Evidence on “what works” for youth in foster care or young adults formerly in foster care is limited (Courtney et al. 2007).

Sustaining efforts to reduce youth homelessness without additional federal funding

Individual Author: 
Vogel, Lisa Klein
Fung, Nickie
Bradley, M. C.

This brief discusses how 7 of the 12 Phase I grantees who were not awarded Phase II grants are working to sustain efforts in their community to prevent homelessness based on the planning accomplished during Phase I. Sustainability efforts were discussed in individual phone calls with the Phase I project director and/or project manager in November and December 2015, as most Phase I grantees were preparing to submit their final Phase I grant report. (Author summary)

 

Parents' persistence and certification in a two-generation education and training program

Individual Author: 
Sabol, Terri J.
Sommer, Teresa E.
Chase-Lansdale, Linsday
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
Yoshikawa, Hirokazu
King, Christopher T.
Kathawalla, Ummul
Alamuddin, Rayane
Gomez, Celia J.
Ross, Emily C.

Two-generation programs provide education and training services for parents while their children attend early childhood education programs. This study examines the rates of persistence and certification of parents in one of the only two-generation interventions in the country under study, CareerAdvance®, which offers training in the healthcare sector to parents while their children attend Head Start (n = 92).

CAP Family Life Study: Year 2 report: September 30, 2011 - September 29, 2012

Individual Author: 
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Sommer, Teresa Eckrich
Sabol, Terri J.
King, Christopher T.
Smith, Tara
Yoshikawa, Hirokazu
Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

CareerAdvance®, launched by the Community Action Project of Tulsa County (CAP), is a healthcare workforce development program designed for low-income parents of young children enrolled in CAP’s early childhood education programs. The two-generation approach of CareerAdvance® is one of the only sectoral workforce development programs with the explicit goal of improving outcomes simultaneously for both parents and children. The present evaluation of CareerAdvance® represents a strong collaboration between university research partners and CAP.