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Too far from jobs: Spatial mismatch and hourly workers

Individual Author: 
Stacy, Christina
Craigie, Terry-Ann
Meixell, Brady
MacDonald, Graham
Zheng, Sihan Vivian
Davis, Christopher
Baird, Christina
Chartoff, Ben
Hinson, David
Lei, Serena

In many cities, low-income residents live far from available jobs, and employers can’t find people to fill open positions. Economists call this “spatial mismatch”—a mismatch between where jobs are located and where job seekers live, which can cause high unemployment rates and lead to longer spells of joblessness. Data from Snag, the largest online marketplace for hourly jobs, show us that this is true for job seekers who use their platform.

Shelter poverty in Ohio: An alternative analysis of rental housing affordability

Individual Author: 
Grady, Bryan P.

In the United States, housing cost burden is most commonly defined by a household spending more than 30 percent of income on housing and utilities. While easy to calculate, it fails to account for how other essential expenses affect income available to spend on housing. This paper compares this ratio with shelter poverty, a measure of burden that accounts for these elements, evaluating differences in results between the two methods among renters in Ohio. Shelter poverty identifies a higher rate of households in economic distress due to housing market conditions.

Neighborhood-level interventions to improve childhood opportunity and lift children out of poverty

Individual Author: 
Sandel, Megan
Faugno, Elena
Mingo, Angela
Cannon, Jessie
Byrd, Kymberly
Acevedo Garcia, Dolores
Collier, Sheena
McClure, Elizabeth
Boynton Jarrett, Renee

Population health is associated with the socioeconomic characteristics of neighborhoods. There is considerable scientific and policy interest in community-level interventions to alleviate child poverty. Intergenerational poverty is associated with inequitable access to opportunities. Improving opportunity structures within neighborhoods may contribute to improved child health and development.

Federal and local efforts to support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness

Individual Author: 
Knas, Emily
Stagner, Matthew
Bradley, M.C.

The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

An institutional analysis of American Job Centers: AJC service delivery in rural areas

Individual Author: 
Betesh, Hannah

To systematically document key characteristics and features of American Job Centers (AJCs), Mathematica and its partners—Social Policy Research Associates, The George Washington University, and Capital Research Corporation—conducted the Institutional Analysis of AJCs for the U.S. Department of Labor. This paper discusses key features and experiences of 12 AJCs that are located in rural areas. The research focuses on AJCs as the unit of service delivery, which is a narrower focus than prior studies of the rural workforce system as a whole.

Developing American Job Centers in jails: Implementation of the Linking to Employment Activities Pre-Release (LEAP) grants

Individual Author: 
Bellotti, Jeanne
Sattar, Samina
Gould-Werth, Alix
Berk, Jillian
Gutierrez, Ivette
Stein, Jillian
Betesh, Hannah
Ochoa, Lindsay
Wiegand, Andrew

To help individuals successfully reenter society after time in jail, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded $10 million in grants to 20 local workforce development boards (LWDBs) in June 2015 for the Linking to Employment Activities PreRelease (LEAP) initiative. Central to the LEAP initiative was creating jail-based American Job Centers (AJCs) with direct linkages to community-based AJCs.

Lessons from a federal initiative to build capacity to end youth homelessness

Individual Author: 
Klein Vogel, Lisa
Bradley, M. C.

This brief discusses the capacity strategy associated with "The Framework to End Youth Homelessness: A Resource Text for Dialogue and Action," (USICH, 2013) (herafter referred to as the “Framework”) and how the strategy was implemented by YARH Phase I grantees (Figure 1). This framework expanded on the 2010 strategic plan, “Opening Doors,” which was geared toward preventing homelessness among multiple populations (USICH, 2010). The 2013 framework targets the specific challenges and needs of homeless adolescents as they transition to adulthood.

Reducing homelessness among youth with child welfare involvement: An analysis of phase I planning processes in a multi-phase grant

Individual Author: 
Stagner, Matthew
Vogel, Lisa Klein
Knas, Emily
Fung, Nickie
Worthington, Julie
Bradley, M. C.
D'Angelo, Angela
Gothro, Andrew
Powers, Courtney

Youth and young adults with child welfare involvement face significant challenges in their transition to adulthood—challenges that increase their risk of becoming homeless. Evidence on “what works” for youth in foster care or young adults formerly in foster care is limited (Courtney et al. 2007).

Learn, Innovate, Improve (LI2): An analytic approach to using evidence for continuous program improvement

Individual Author: 
Kabak, Victoria
Derr, Michelle
Mastri, Annalisa
McCay, Jonathan

This session describes Learn, Innovate, Improve (LI2), a systematic approach to managing human services program change and continuous quality improvement. LI2 involves assessing the environment and motivation for change (Learn); designing evidence-informed solutions (Innovate); and conducting iterative pilots (“road tests”) and other analytic techniques to refine implementation (Improve). Moderated by Victoria Kabak (Administration for Children and Families), this session provided an overview of LI2 and illustrate how LI2 has been used. (Author introduction)

Behavioral Intervention Materials Compendium

Individual Author: 
Anzelone, Caitlin
Dechausay, Nadine
Alemany, Xavier

The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted 15 randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions across eight states, in the domains of work support, child support, and child care. BIAS used a systematic approach called “behavioral diagnosis and design” to develop the interventions and their associated materials.