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Tuning in to local labor markets: Findings from the sectoral employment impact study

Individual Author: 
Maguire, Shelia
Freely, Joshua
Clymer, Carol
Conway, Maureen
Schwartz, Deena
Reference type: 
Stakeholder Resource

Over the past two decades, an innovative approach to workforce development known as sectoral employment has emerged, resulting in the creation of industry-specific training programs that prepare unemployed and underskilled workers for skilled positions and connect them with employers seeking to fill such vacancies. In 2003, with funding from the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, P/PV launched the Sectoral Employment Impact Study to rigorously assess whether mature, nonprofit-led sector-focused programs could increase the earnings of disadvantaged workers and job seekers.

State strategies for improving the employment outcomes of TANF and low-income families

Individual Author: 
National Governor's Association (NGA) Center For Best Practices
Reference type: 
Report

Research studies during the past decade have shown that despite the large number of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients entering the workforce, many of these individuals have difficulty remaining employed and advancing in the labor market.


Promoting employment retention

Individual Author: 
Relave, Nanette
Reference type: 
Report

This document examines policy and program issues related to promoting employment retention among recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) who have moved from welfare into employment. The document begins with background information about the work requirements and time limits affecting TANF recipients.

The Employment Retention and Advancement project: Results from the Personal Roads to Individual Development and Employment (PRIDE) program in New York City

Individual Author: 
Bloom, Dan
Miller, Cynthia
Azurdia, Gilda

Many states are searching for ways to promote employment among welfare recipients facing serious barriers to work. This report presents interim results from an evaluation of New York City’s Personal Roads to Individual Development and Employment (PRIDE) program, a large-scale welfare-to-work program for recipients with work-limiting medical or mental health conditions. The PRIDE evaluation is part of the Employment Retention and Advancement (ERA) project, which was conceived by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

State response to substance-abusing TANF recipients: The challenge for welfare policy

Individual Author: 
Shin, Sunny Hyucksun
Choi, Sam
Reference type: 
Journal Article

Although a large number of job-ready welfare recipients have left welfare since the enactment of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-193-PRWORA), 5.5 million "harder-to-serve" populations including those with substance abuse problems still remain in state TANF caseloads. Although researchers and policy makers need to better understand the connections between substance abuse and welfare dependency, little is known about states' response to substance-abusing TANF recipients.

Access to employment for adults in poverty in the Buffalo-Niagara region

Individual Author: 
Hess, Daniel Baldwin
Reference type: 
Journal Article

This study extends the spatial mismatch literature by examining access to employment for the low-income population in Erie and Niagara Counties in western New York State. The analysis uses geographical information systems (GIS) to map residence and employment locations and calculate measures of employment and transport access. Throughout the two-county region, two-thirds of adults in poverty live within close proximity to a reasonable number of low-wage jobs.

Working far from home: Transportation and welfare reform in the ten big states

Individual Author: 
Waller, Margy
Hughes, Mark A.
Reference type: 
Report

Transportation assistance for low-income workers is complex, expensive, and rife with unintended consequences. Policymakers confuse ends and means when job access strategies are too focused on public transit systems. The policy challenge is helping low-income workers get to distant jobs on difficult schedules, but too often both policymakers and decisionmakers act as if the challenge is devising a way to make public transit "good enough" to serve the reverse commutes of low-income workers. This represents both a bias and a blind spot.

Welfare reform: Work-site-based activities can play an important role in TANF programs

Individual Author: 
Fagnoni, Cynthia M.
Reference type: 
Report

The General Accounting Office (GAO) examined worksite-based activities currently in place to help recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) develop the skills required for successful transition to unsubsidized employment. Data were collected from the following sources: (1) data reported by states to the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS); (2) interviews of selected state TANF administrators and experts on TANF work programs; and (3) review of nine state- and local-level worksite activities nationwide.

Does work pay? An analysis of work incentives under TANF

Individual Author: 
Acs, Gregory
Coe, Norma B.
Watson, Keith
Lerman, Robert I.
Reference type: 
Report

The basic analysis describes how the income of a single parent with two children changes as she moves from not working to working at a part-time job at minimum wage, then to full-time work at minimum wage, and finally to a full-time job paying $9/hour. In calculating income, we consider the family's earnings, its Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) grant, the cash value of food stamps it receives, federal and state earned income tax credits, any other state tax credits, and all federal and state tax liabilities.