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Implementation and relative impacts of two job search assistance programs in New York City

Individual Author: 
Martinson, Karin
Harvill, Eleanor
Litwok, Daniel
Schwartz, Deena
De La Rosa, Siobhan Mills
Saunders, Correne
Bell, Stephen

This report describes the implementation and impact study findings from an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of two approaches to providing job search assistance (JSA) to cash assistance applicants in New York City. From 2015 to 2016, the New York City Department of Social Services/Human Resources Administration administered two JSA programs for “job ready” cash assistance applicants: Back to Work (known as B2W, the pre-existing program) and Independent Job Search (IJS, a new program).

“We get a chance to show impact": Program staff reflect on participating in a rigorous, multi-site evaluation

Individual Author: 
Hamadyk, Jill
Gardiner, Karen

This brief summarizes the experiences of leaders and staff from eight career pathways programs that participated in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Evaluation. Based on firsthand accounts, the brief describes how staff perceived the benefits of participating in the randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluation, the challenges they experienced—in particular recruiting study participants and implementing its random assignment procedures—and how they overcame challenges. The brief then describes lessons staff learned from participating in PACE.

Promoting effective parenting practices and preventing child behavior problems in school among ethnically diverse families from underserved, urban communities

Individual Author: 
Brotman, Laurie M.
Calzada, Esther
Huang, Keng-Yen
Kingston, Sharon
Dawson-McClure, Spring
Kamboukos, Dimitra
Rosenfelt, Amanda
Schwab, Amihai
Petkova, Eva

This study examines the efficacy of ParentCorps among 4-year-old children (N = 171) enrolled in prekindergarten in schools in a large urban school district. ParentCorps includes a series of 13 group sessions for parents and children held at the school during early evening hours and facilitated by teachers and mental health professionals. ParentCorps resulted in significant benefits on effective parenting practices and teacher ratings of child behavior problems in school.

Findings from in-depth interviews with participants in subsidized employment programs

Individual Author: 
Fink, Barbara

Subsidized employment and transitional jobs programs seek to increase employment and earnings among individuals who have not been able to find employment on their own. First-hand accounts of participants’ experiences in these programs can inform efforts to improve long-term employment outcomes for various “hard-to-employ” populations.

Federal and local efforts to support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness

Individual Author: 
Knas, Emily
Stagner, Matthew
Bradley, M.C.

The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

Developing American Job Centers in jails: Implementation of the Linking to Employment Activities Pre-Release (LEAP) grants

Individual Author: 
Bellotti, Jeanne
Sattar, Samina
Gould-Werth, Alix
Berk, Jillian
Gutierrez, Ivette
Stein, Jillian
Betesh, Hannah
Ochoa, Lindsay
Wiegand, Andrew

To help individuals successfully reenter society after time in jail, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded $10 million in grants to 20 local workforce development boards (LWDBs) in June 2015 for the Linking to Employment Activities PreRelease (LEAP) initiative. Central to the LEAP initiative was creating jail-based American Job Centers (AJCs) with direct linkages to community-based AJCs.

Analysis plan for the PACE intermediate (three-year) follow-up study

Individual Author: 
Judkins, David
Fein, David
Buron, Larry

The Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) evaluation is a study of nine promising programs that use a “career pathways” framework for increasing education, employment, and self-sufficiency among low-income individuals and families. Funded by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, PACE will include three points of participant follow-up—at 18 months, three years, and six years after random assignment.

Evaluation report on New York City’s Advocate, Intervene, Mentor program

Individual Author: 
Cramer, Lindsey
Lynch, Mathew
Lipman, Micaela
Yu, Lilly
Astone, Nan Marie

This report presents the findings of an implementation and outcome evaluation of the Advocate, Intervene, Mentor (AIM) program, a court-mandated juvenile alternative-to-placement program serving probation clients ages 13 to 18 years with high criminogenic risk. The evaluation finds that AIM successfully helps participants avoid out-of-home placement1 and reduce recidivism, as well as pursue and achieve individualized goals to help reduce their risk of reoffending. (Edited author introduction)

The challenge of repeating success in a changing world: Final report on the Center for Employment Training Replication Sites

Individual Author: 
Miller, Cynthia
Bos, Johannes
Porter, Kristin
Tseng, Fannie M.
Abe, Yasuyo

The Center for Employment Training (CET), headquartered in San Jose, California, gained the attention of policymakers in the early 1990s, when it proved to be the only training program in two major evaluations (one of which, JOBSTART, targeted disadvantaged youth) to produce large positive effects on participants’ employment and earnings. Such documented success is rare among employment and training programs in general, but it is especially unusual among programs serving youth.

Testing an expanded Earned Income Tax Credit for single adults: Year 1 of Paycheck Plus

Individual Author: 
Miller, Cynthia
Schultz, Caroline
Bernardi, Alexandra

Despite this broad support, an EITC expansion for adults without children has yet to become policy in today’s environment of budget ceilings and efforts to rein in spending. The Paycheck Plus study will inform this debate by presenting evidence on the effects of this type of policy on low-wage workers’ income and earnings. This brief, the second in a series, provides an update on the project, describing the implementation of the bonus during the first year and receipt rates during the 2015 tax season.