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Behavioral Intervention Materials Compendium

Individual Author: 
Anzelone, Caitlin
Dechausay, Nadine
Alemany, Xavier

The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted 15 randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions across eight states, in the domains of work support, child support, and child care. BIAS used a systematic approach called “behavioral diagnosis and design” to develop the interventions and their associated materials.

Freedom from hunger: An achievable goal for the United States of America

Individual Author: 
Chilton, Mariana
Coates, Spencer
Doar, Robert
Everett, Jeremy
Finn, Susan
Frank, Deborah
Jamason, Cherie
Shore, Billy
Sykes, Russell

To identify solutions to hunger, Congress created the bipartisan National Commission on Hunger “to provide policy recommendations to Congress and the USDA Secretary to more effectively use existing programs and funds of the Department of Agriculture to combat domestic hunger and food insecurity.”

More than a nudge: Engaging TANF recipients in welfare-to-work programs

Individual Author: 
Kabak, Victoria
Baird, Peter
Farrell, Mary
Sutcliffe, Sophia

Building on the first major effort to bring a behavioral science lens to programs serving poor families in the United States, the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency – Next Generation project is testing interventions to increase TANF recipients’ engagement in three sites: Los Angeles County, Monroe County (NY), and Washington State. Moderated by Victoria Kabak (Administration for Children and Families), this presentation will share the diagnostic design model and introduce the interventions. (Author introduction)

Youth Count! Process study

Individual Author: 
Pergamit, Mike
Cunningham, Mary K.
Burt, Martha R.
Lee, Pamela
Howell, Brent
Dumlao Bertumen, Kassie

Homelessness among unaccompanied youth is a hidden problem: the number of young people who experience homelessness each year is largely unknown. To improve the national response to youth homelessness, policymakers need better data on the magnitude of the problem. Youth Count! is a Federal interagency initiative that aims to improve counts of unaccompanied homeless youth. Nine communities participated in the initiative by expanding their annual homeless point-in-time efforts to increase coverage of homeless youth.

Pilot project to assess validation of EITC eligibility with state data

Individual Author: 
Pergamit, Mike
Maag, Elaine
Hanson, Devlin
Ratcliffe, Caroline
Edelstein, Sara
Minton, Sarah

The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) annually delivers over $60 billion to low-income working families. The Office of Management and Budget identifies the EITC as having the highest improper payment rate among 13 high error programs. We explore whether state SNAP and TANF administrative data can be used by IRS to reduce erroneous payments and target outreach efforts. Too few EITC claimants receive TANF to make the TANF data useful.

Forging a path: Final impacts and costs of New York City’s Young Adult Internship Program

Individual Author: 
Cummings, Danielle
Farrell, Mary
Skemer, Melanie

This report presents 30-month impact results from a random assignment evaluation of the Young Adult Internship Program (YAIP), a subsidized employment program for young people in New York City who have become disconnected from school and work. Operated by various provider agencies, YAIP offers disconnected young people between the ages of 16 and 24 a temporary paid internship, as well as various support services.

Parents and Children Together: Evaluating responsible fatherhood and healthy marriage programs

Individual Author: 
Avellar, Sarah
Moore, Quinn
Patnaik, Ankita
Covington, Reginald
Wu, April

Presented at the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency, these slides summarize impact findings from Mathematica’s evaluation of six Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood programs. Released under the Parents and Children Together project, this work is part of a growing body of evidence designed to better understand what works in creating healthier families. (Author abstract)

The Social Security Administration's Youth Transition Demonstration Projects: Profiles of the random assignment projects

Individual Author: 
Martinez, John
Manno, Michelle S.
Baird, Peter
Fraker, Thomas
Honeycutt, Todd
Mamun, Arif
O'Day, Bonnie
Rangarajan, Anu

The transition to adulthood for youth with disabilities, particularly youth receiving Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or other disability program benefits, can be especially challenging. In addition to the host of issues facing all transition-age youth, young people with disabilities face special issues related to health, social isolation, service needs, and lack of access to supports. These challenges complicate their planning for future education and work, and often lead to poor educational and employment outcomes, high risk of dependency, and a lifetime of poverty.

Implementation lessons from the Social Security Administration’s Youth Transition Demonstration

Individual Author: 
Martinez, John
Fraker, Thomas
Manno, Michelle S.
Baird, Peter
Mamun, Arif
O'Day, Bonnie
Rangarajan, Anu
Wittenburg, David

The Social Security Administration (SSA) is conducting the Youth Transition Demonstration (YTD) as part of a broader initiative to encourage disability beneficiaries to return to work. The demonstration provides youth ages 14 through 25 with employment-related services and waivers of certain rules governing the Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance programs, including childhood disability benefits. The waivers augment existing financial incentives for beneficiaries to work.

Encouraging evidence on a sector-focused advancement strategy: A preview summary of two-year impacts from the WorkAdvance demonstration

Individual Author: 
Hendra, Richard
Greenberg, David H.
Hamilton, Gayle
Oppenheim, Ari
Pennington, Alexandra
Schaberg, Kelsey
Tessler, Betsy L.

This report summarizes the two-year findings of a rigorous random assignment evaluation of the WorkAdvance model, a sectoral training and advancement initiative. Launched in 2011, WorkAdvance goes beyond the previous generation of employment programs by introducing demand-driven skills training and a focus on jobs that have career pathways. The model is heavily influenced by the positive findings from the Sectoral Employment Impact Study (SEIS) completed in 2010.