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Association of childhood trauma exposure with adult psychiatric disorders and functional outcomes

Individual Author: 
Copeland, William E.
Shanahan, Lilly
Hinesley, Jennifer
Chan, Robin F.
Aberg, Karolina A.
Fairbank, John A.
van den Oord, Edwin J. C. G.
Costello, E. Jane

IMPORTANCE Being exposed to trauma is a common childhood experience associated with symptoms and impairments in childhood.

OBJECTIVE To assess the association between cumulative childhood trauma exposure and adult psychiatric and functional outcomes.

Association of Medicaid expansion with access to rehabilitative care in adult trauma patients

Individual Author: 
Zogg, Cheryl K.
Scott, John W.
Metcalfe, David
Gluck, Abbe R.
Curfman, Gregory D.
Davis, Kimberly A.
Dimick, Justin B.
Haider, Adil H.

Importance Trauma is a leading cause of death and disability for patients of all ages, many of whom are also among the most likely to be uninsured. Passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was intended to improve access to care through improvements in insurance. However, despite nationally reported changes in the payer mix of patients, the extent of the law’s impact on insurance coverage among trauma patients is unknown, as is its success in improving trauma outcomes and promoting increased access to rehabilitation.

An institutional analysis of American Job Centers: AJC service delivery in rural areas

Individual Author: 
Betesh, Hannah

To systematically document key characteristics and features of American Job Centers (AJCs), Mathematica and its partners—Social Policy Research Associates, The George Washington University, and Capital Research Corporation—conducted the Institutional Analysis of AJCs for the U.S. Department of Labor. This paper discusses key features and experiences of 12 AJCs that are located in rural areas. The research focuses on AJCs as the unit of service delivery, which is a narrower focus than prior studies of the rural workforce system as a whole.

How does household income affect child personality traits and behaviors?

Individual Author: 
Akee, Randall
Copeland, William
Costello, E. Jane
Simeonova, Emilia

We examine the effects of a quasi-experimental unconditional household income transfer on child emotional and behavioral health and personality traits. Using longitudinal data, we find that there are large beneficial effects on children’s emotional and behavioral health and personality traits during adolescence. We find evidence that these effects are most pronounced for children who start out with the lowest initial endowments. The income intervention also results in improvements in parental relationships which we interpret as a potential mechanism behind our findings.

Child support cooperation requirements in child care subsidy programs and SNAP: Key policy considerations

Individual Author: 
Selekman, Rebekah
Holcomb, Pamela

The EMPOWERED study, conducted on behalf of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines the use of performance measures, work requirements, and child support cooperation requirements across human services programs. This issue brief examines the use of child support cooperation requirements in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) program and child care subsidy programs funded under the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF). (Author summary)

The challenge of repeating success in a changing world: Final report on the Center for Employment Training Replication Sites

Individual Author: 
Miller, Cynthia
Bos, Johannes
Porter, Kristin
Tseng, Fannie M.
Abe, Yasuyo

The Center for Employment Training (CET), headquartered in San Jose, California, gained the attention of policymakers in the early 1990s, when it proved to be the only training program in two major evaluations (one of which, JOBSTART, targeted disadvantaged youth) to produce large positive effects on participants’ employment and earnings. Such documented success is rare among employment and training programs in general, but it is especially unusual among programs serving youth.

Modeling the impacts of child care quality on children's preschool cognitive development

Individual Author: 
Duncan, Greg J.
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Early Child Care Research Network

The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care compared 3 statistical methods that adjust for family selection bias to test whether child care type and quality relate to cognitive and academic skills. The methods included: multiple regression models of 54-month outcomes, change models of differences in 24- and 54-month outcomes, and residualized change models of 54-month outcomes adjusting for the 24-month outcome. The study was unable to establish empirically which model best adjusted for selection and omitted-variable bias.

Quality child care for infants and toddlers: Case studies of three community strategies

Individual Author: 
Paulsell, Diane
Nogales, Renée
Cohen, Julie

Highlights findings from an in-depth study of collaborative community initiatives to improve low-income families' access to good-quality care for infants and toddlers. Focuses on three types of initiatives launched in diverse communities. Notes that paying for care and ensuring good-quality care are cross-cutting concerns. (Author summary)

Thresholds in the association between child care quality and child outcomes in rural preschool children

Individual Author: 
Burchinal, Margaret
Vernon-Feagans, Lynne
Vitiello, Virginia
Greenberg, Mark
The Family Life Project Key Investigators

This study examined whether a minimum level of preschool quality (threshold) is needed in order for a relationship to exist between preschool quality and children's academic, behavioral, and working memory in a sample of children from low-wealth rural communities where quality child care has been found to be lower than more urban communities. Participants included 849 children from two high-poverty, rural regions. Preschool quality was rated using the CLASS observational measure.

Youth Count! Process study

Individual Author: 
Pergamit, Mike
Cunningham, Mary K.
Burt, Martha R.
Lee, Pamela
Howell, Brent
Dumlao Bertumen, Kassie

Homelessness among unaccompanied youth is a hidden problem: the number of young people who experience homelessness each year is largely unknown. To improve the national response to youth homelessness, policymakers need better data on the magnitude of the problem. Youth Count! is a Federal interagency initiative that aims to improve counts of unaccompanied homeless youth. Nine communities participated in the initiative by expanding their annual homeless point-in-time efforts to increase coverage of homeless youth.