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A comparison of psychosocial barriers among welfare recipients: Implications for drug treatment

Individual Author: 
Montoya, Isaac D.
Atkinson, John S.
Struse, Heidi M.
Reference type: 
Journal Article

Implementation of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) presents welfare recipients with time-limited benefits and work requirements. However, it is estimated that over 140,000 welfare recipients meet the DSM-IV criteria for “drug dependence”. In this study, samples of chronic drug using and non-drug using female TANF recipients were compared with regard to: current employment, psychological functioning, self-perceived employment skills, barriers to employment, and need for help in seeking employment.

Child care expenses of America's families

Individual Author: 
Giannarelli, Linda
Barsimnatov, James
Reference type: 
Report

This paper uses a recent survey—the 1997 National Survey of America’s Families, or NSAF—to look at the child care expenses of working families with children under age 13. The authors examine the likelihood that different kinds of families pay for child care and how much money different kinds of families pay, both in dollar terms and as a percentage of their earnings. They focus on child care expenses in nonsummer months, providing a snapshot of monthly expenses in the spring or fall of 1997. (author abstract)

Welfare policies matter for children and youth: Lessons for TANF reauthorization

Individual Author: 
Morris, Pamela
Knox, Virginia
Gennetian, Lisa A.
Reference type: 
Report

This policy brief deepens our understanding of how changes in welfare policies affect the well-being of elementary school-age and adolescent children by showing how reforms targeted at parents can have important consequences for their children. Specifically, the findings reported here demonstrate that welfare policies that aim to improve the economic security of families can benefit elementary school-age children and can complement school-based interventions by giving children a better start in their education.

Banking relationships of lower-income families and the governmental trend toward electronic payment

Individual Author: 
Hogarth, Jeanne M.
O'Donnell, Kevin H.
Reference type: 
Journal Article

This article examines the ways in which lower income families obtain checking and credit services, the effects that the government move to electronic payment may have on these families and on depository institutions, and the promotional and educational efforts that may be needed to facilitate the move to electronic services. (author abstract)

Hispanic homeownership seminar

Individual Author: 
Abt Associates
Reference type: 
Stakeholder Resource

This powerpoint presents findings from a study which describes key characteristics of the Hispanic population and trends in Hispanic homeownership rates and gaps relative to whites; reviews what is known about the determinants of Hispanic homeownership gaps and the principal barriers to increasing Hispanic homeownership; and, identifies existing efforts to promote Hispanic homeownership and what is known about the effectiveness of these efforts. (author abstract)

State strategies to reduce child and family poverty

Individual Author: 
Golonka, Susan
Hoffman, Linda
Reference type: 
Stakeholder Resource

Poverty can result in long-term social and economic costs for children and families, communities, and states. In 2006, more than 13 million children lived below the federal poverty level. Children who grow up poor are more likely to earn less as adults, complete fewer years of formal education, and face more health issues than children living in higher-income families. Poverty can also contribute to poor social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes for children and hinder cognitive development.

Early implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Workforce development and unemployment insurance provisions

Individual Author: 
Hobbie, Richard A.
Barnow, Burt S.
Reference type: 
Stakeholder Resource

The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) received economic stimulus funds through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) that were intended to provide jobs, expand access to Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits, employment services, and retrain millions of unemployed workers during the “”Great Recession”. Programs that received additional allocated funds included the Workforce Investment Act’s Adult and Dislocation Workers Programs, Wagner-Peyser Act for unrestricted services and reemployment services, and the UI program.

Children and welfare reform: What policy theories are being implemented in states where most poor children live?

Individual Author: 
Johnson, Cathy Marie
Gais, Thomas Lewis
Lawrence, Catherine
Reference type: 
Book

This paper revisits 1997-98 findings that indicated that during the first years of state implementation of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), States were most likely to implement the environment theory, which claims that children benefit socially and psychologically from being part of a household in which caregivers have jobs, and less likely to create policies, programs, structures, and processes that put the resource and family structure theories into effect.

Have Welfare-to-Work programs improved over time in putting welfare recipients to work?

Individual Author: 
Greenberg, David H.
Robins, Philip K.
Reference type: 
Report

The authors examine data from 21 random assignment evaluations of 76 experimental welfare-to-work programs conducted in the United States between 1983 and 1998 to determine whether the impacts of these programs on employment improved over time. Welfare-to-work programs have long played an important role in the federal assistance program known as Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), now called Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF).

Income volatility and family structure patterns: Association with stability and change in Food Stamp Program participation

Individual Author: 
Hernandez, Daphne
Ziol-Guest, Kathleen M.
Reference type: 
Journal Article

Using the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study, this research investigated how income volatility and family structure patterns influence participation patterns of stability and change in Food Stamp Program participation among a sample of young families (n = 1,263). Multinomial logistic regression models suggested that families that experienced significant declines in income were more likely to persistently participate and initiate participation than to never participate.