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Independent contractors and nontraditional workers: Implications for the child support program

Individual Author: 
Glosser, Asaph
Germain, Justin

The rise of online platform work through companies such as Uber, Care.com, and TaskRabbit has increased the visibility of alternative work arrangements. This has sparked interest among researchers, policymakers, and program administrators in the “gig economy” and its implications for labor markets, worker protections, and access to benefits.

A year in Region XI Head Start: Children’s growth and development from the American Indian and Alaska Native Family and Child Experiences Survey 2015 (AI/AN FACES 2015)

Individual Author: 
Bernstein, Sara
Malone, Lizabeth
AI/AN FACES 2015 Workgroup

It is important for Head Start to have information about children’s and families’ strengths and needs over the course of the program year. We examine Region XI Head Start children’s growth in cognitive skills (in language, literacy, and mathematics), social-emotional skills, and executive function during the program year to learn about their progress toward being ready for school.

The role of licensing in supporting quality practices in early care and education

Individual Author: 
Maxwell, Kelly
Starr, Rebecca

Licensing is traditionally viewed as providing the foundation (or the floor) of quality in early care and education (ECE) settings. States and territories are responsible for licensing child care programs, and a license serves as permission to legally operate a child care program. The essential purpose of licensing is to provide basic protections to prevent harm to children.

Who receives Medicaid in old age? Rules and Reality

Individual Author: 
Borella, Margherita
De Nardi, Mariacristina
French, Eric

Medicaid is a government program that provides health insurance to the old who are sick and have little assets and income compared to their medical needs. Thus, it explicitly tests for income, assets, and health or medical needs to determine eligibility. We ask how these rules map into the reality of Medicaid recipiency and what observable characteristics are important to determine who ends up on Medicaid. The data show that both singles and couples with high retirement income can end up on Medicaid at very advanced ages.

The role of mindfulness in reducing the adverse effects childhood stress and trauma

Individual Author: 
Ortiz, Robin
Sibinga, Erica M.

Research suggests that many children are exposed to adverse experiences in childhood. Such adverse childhood exposures may result in stress and trauma, which are associated with increased morbidity and mortality into adulthood. In general populations and trauma-exposed adults, mindfulness interventions have demonstrated reduced depression and anxiety, reduced trauma-related symptoms, enhanced coping and mood, and improved quality of life. Studies in children and youth also demonstrate that mindfulness interventions improve mental, behavioral, and physical outcomes.

Poverty and academic achievement across the urban to rural landscape: Associations with community resources and stressors

Individual Author: 
Miller, Portia
Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth
Coley, Rebekah Levine

Poor children begin school with fewer academic skills than their nonpoor peers, and these disparities translate into lower achievement, educational attainment, and economic stability in adulthood. Child poverty research traditionally focuses on urban or rural poor, but a shifting spatial orientation of poverty necessitates a richer examination of how urbanicity intersects with economic disadvantage.

Predictors of father involvement in a sample of low-income men enrolled in a Responsible Fatherhood program

Individual Author: 
Hayward-Everson, R. Anna
Honegger, Laura
Glazebrook, Alexander
Rabeno, Stephen
Yim, Kevin

Fathers play an important role in the lives of their children and are an underserved and understudied population. This study explored predictors of father involvement in a sample of low-income fathers enrolled in a responsible fatherhood program in one large county in the northeastern United States. Although many demographic, psychological, and social factors have been found to be associated with father involvement in other research, in our study only living situation, marital status, substance abuse, and self-esteem were significant predictors of involvement.

Which program characteristics are linked to program impacts? Lessons from the HPOG 1.0 evaluation

Individual Author: 
Walton, Douglas
Harvill, Eleanor L.
Peck, Laura R.

In 2010, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the first round of five-year grants from the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG 1.0) Program to 32 organizations in 23 states; five were tribal organizations. The purpose of the HPOG Program is to provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand.

Impact of neighborhood safety on the association between parental knowledge and delinquency

Individual Author: 
King, Yemimah A.
Fite, Paula J.
Poquiz, Jonathan L.

It is important to understand the role of sources of parental knowledge within the context of perceived neighborhood safety, which has clear implications for how parents should effectively gain knowledge of youth behavior depending on the perceived safety of the neighborhood in which they reside.