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Mothers' transitions from welfare to work and the well-being of preschoolers and adolescents

Individual Author: 
Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay
Moffitt, Robert A.
Lohman, Brenda J.
Cherlin, Andrew J.
Levine Coley, Rebekah
Pittman, Laura D.
Roff, Jennifer
Votruba-Drzal, Elizabeth

Results from a longitudinal study of 2,402 low-income families during the recent unprecedented era of welfare reform suggest that mothers' transitions off welfare and into employment are not associated with negative outcomes for preschoolers (ages 2 to 4 years) or young adolescents (ages 10 to 14 years). Indeed, no significant associations with mothers' welfare and employment transitions were found for preschoolers, and the dominant pattern was also of few statistically significant associations for adolescents.

Homeless families’ experiences with public benefit programs, employment, and family transitions

Individual Author: 
Benton, Amanda
Dunton, Lauren
Khadduri, Jill
Walton, Douglas

These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S.

Behavioral health improvements over time among adults in families experiencing homelessness

Individual Author: 
Shinn, Marybeth
Gubits, Daniel
Dunton, Lauren

The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS. 

Youth Count! Process study

Individual Author: 
Pergamit, Mike
Cunningham, Mary K.
Burt, Martha R.
Lee, Pamela
Howell, Brent
Dumlao Bertumen, Kassie

Homelessness among unaccompanied youth is a hidden problem: the number of young people who experience homelessness each year is largely unknown. To improve the national response to youth homelessness, policymakers need better data on the magnitude of the problem. Youth Count! is a Federal interagency initiative that aims to improve counts of unaccompanied homeless youth. Nine communities participated in the initiative by expanding their annual homeless point-in-time efforts to increase coverage of homeless youth.

Helping families involved in the child welfare system achieve housing stability

Individual Author: 
Cunningham, Mary K.
Pergamit, Mike
Baum, Abigail
Luna, Jessica

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)‘s Family Unification Program (FUP) provides low-income families involved in the child welfare system with housing vouchers. FUP is an important vehicle for understanding three issues: (1) the overlap between the child welfare system, housing, and homelessness; (2) how to provide housing to vulnerable, high-need families; and (3) how to facilitate cross-system partnerships between public housing agencies and child welfare agencies.

Within and beyond the classroom door: Assessing quality in child care centers

Individual Author: 
Phillips, Deborah
Mekos, Debra
Scarr, Sandra
McCartney, Kathleen
Abbott-Shim, Martha

This study reports data from a multisite study of typical center-based child care and children’s development regarding (a) associations among quality of care defined by structural features, process indicators, and compliance with state regulations, (b) variation in quality based on the stringency of state child care regulations and center compliance, and (c) specific quality indicators that show especially strong links to children’s experiences in child care.

Bridging the opportunity divide for low-income youth: Implementation and early impacts of the Year Up program

Individual Author: 
Fein, David
Hamadyk, Jill

This report assesses the implementation and early impacts of Year Up, a national sectoral training program for young adults aged 18-24. Year Up aims to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete training leading to employment in high-demand, well-paying occupations.

Evaluation of Raising Adolescent Families Together program: A medical home for adolescent mothers and their children

Individual Author: 
Cox, Joanne E.
Buman, Mathew P.
Woods, Elizabeth R.
Famakinwa, Olatokunbo
Harris, Sion Kim

Objectives. This study described a medical home model for adolescent mothers and their children, and their 1- and 2-year preventive care, repeat pregnancy, and psychosocial outcomes.

Methods. In this prospective, single cohort demonstration project, adolescent mothers (14–18 years old) and their children received care in a medical home. Demographic, medical and social processes, and outcomes data were collected at enrollment through 24 months. Change over time and predictors of repeat pregnancy were analyzed.

Home visiting program impacts on reducing homelessness among young mothers

Individual Author: 
Stargel, Lauren E.
Fauth, Rebecca C.
Easterbrooks, M. Ann

In the current study, we aimed to determine the effects of Healthy Families Massachusetts (HFM), a statewide home visiting program, on young mothers’ experiences with homelessness during enrollment and after program completion. Data were drawn from a longitudinal, randomized control trial evaluation of HFM. Data collection occurred across 5 time points between 2008 and 2015 from a sample of 704 participants.

Longitudinal patterns of self-regulation among ethnic minority children facing poverty

Individual Author: 
Kia-Keating, Maryam
Nylund-Gibson, Karen
Kia-Keating, Brett M.
Schock, Christine
Grimm, Ryan P.

Early poverty is associated with a cumulative load of family and community risk factors that can impact the development of self-regulatory abilities and result in socio-emotional and achievement gaps which begin early and persist across the lifespan. Ethnic minorities are disproportionately represented among children living in poverty. The longitudinal trajectories of self-regulation are important to understand in this population, in order to best inform prevention efforts.