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Louisville

Predicting repeated and persistent family homelessness: Do families’ characteristics and experiences matter?

Individual Author: 
Glendening, Zachary
Shinn, Marybeth

Research indicates that most families using emergency shelters stay briefly—one to four or five months—and rarely return (Culhane et al. 2007). However, some families remain homeless for long periods of time or experience repeated episodes of homelessness. These families may have characteristics and service needs that differ from those of families who leave shelter quickly and permanently. Communities and homelessness practitioners might benefit from identifying those families’ characteristics and experiences to improve targeting of services.

Homeless families’ experiences with public benefit programs, employment, and family transitions

Individual Author: 
Benton, Amanda
Dunton, Lauren
Khadduri, Jill
Walton, Douglas

These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S.

Behavioral health improvements over time among adults in families experiencing homelessness

Individual Author: 
Shinn, Marybeth
Gubits, Daniel
Dunton, Lauren

The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS. 

Child care subsidies, quality of care, and the labor supply of low-income, single mothers

Individual Author: 
Berger, Mark C.
Black, Dan A.

We examine the effects of child care subsidies on the labor supply decisions of low-income mothers and on the quality of care their children receive using newly gathered data on two programs that subsidize the child care expenditures of families in Kentucky. We find that single mothers who receive child care subsidies are more likely to be employed and are generally more satisfied with the care their children receive, but subsidies have little effect on hours worked. (Author abstract)

Work requirements in public housing authorities: Experiences to date and knowledge gaps

Individual Author: 
Levy, Diane K.
Edmonds, Leiha
Simington, Jasmine

This brief presents information on work requirement policies implemented by public housing agencies and estimates the percent of households affected by the requirements. Noting the lack of evidence on the outcomes and effects of work requirements on households’ employment and income and on the agencies’ implementation costs, it closes with questions to guide future research and policy considerations. (Author abstract) 

Family Options Study: 3-year impacts of housing and services interventions for homeless families

Individual Author: 
Gubits, Daniel
Shinn, Marybeth
Wood, Michelle
Bell, Stephen
Dastrup, Samuel
Solari, Claudia D.
Brown, Scott R.
McInnis, Debi
McCall, Tom
Kattel, Utsav

The Family Options Study: Three-year Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families documents the outcomes of the 2,282 formerly homeless study families approximately 37 months after having been randomly assigned to one of four housing and/or services interventions.

Reducing work disincentives in the Housing Choice Voucher Program: Rent Reform Demonstration baseline report

Individual Author: 
Riccio, James
Deitch, Victoria
Verma, Nandita

The purpose of the Rent Reform Demonstration is to test an alternative to the current rent-setting system for families using housing choice vouchers (HCV). The goals of the alternative rent-setting model now being tested are to incentivize employment and reduce the complexity and burden (and, thus, the cost) of administering the rent policy, while not causing unnecessary hardship for HCV households.

Patterns of benefit receipt among families who experience homelessness

Individual Author: 
Khadduri, Jill
Burt, Martha R.
Walton, Douglas

What are the patterns of benefit receipt among families who experience homelessness? This brief uses data collected for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Family Options Study to analyze patterns of receipt of TANF cash assistance, SNAP food assistance, and publicly funded health insurance benefits among these families, with a focus on the characteristics of those receiving and not receiving benefits. The brief: