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Los Angeles

Extended kin and children's behavioral functioning: Family structure and parental immigrant status

Individual Author: 
Kang, Jeehye
Cohen, Philip N.

Using the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A. FANS), this paper examines the association between the presence of co-resident extended kin and children's internalizing and externalizing behaviors. The paper demonstrates the differential role of extended kin by family structure, as well as across parental immigrant status – specifically, nativity and documentation status. Children in the sample were found to be disadvantaged in extended family households, especially with regard to internalizing behaviors.

Developmental trajectories of acculturation: Links with family functioning and mental health in recent-immigrant Hispanic adolescents

Individual Author: 
Schwartz, Seth J.
Unger, Jennifer B.
Zamboanga, Byron L.
Córdova, David
Mason, Craig A.
Huang, Shi
Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes
Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.
Des Rosiers, Sabrina
Soto, Daniel W.
Villamar, Juan A.
Pattarroyo, Monica
Lizzi, Karina M.
Szapocznik, José

The present study was designed to examine acculturative changes, and their effects on mental health and family functioning, in recent-immigrant Hispanic adolescents. A sample of 302 Hispanic adolescents was assessed five times over a 2.5-year period. Participants completed measures of Hispanic and U.S. practices, collectivist and individualist values, and ethnic and U.S. identity at each timepoint. Baseline and Time 5 levels of mental health and family functioning were also assessed. Latent class growth analyses produced two-class solutions for practices, values, and identifications.

Findings from in-depth interviews with participants in subsidized employment programs

Individual Author: 
Fink, Barbara

Subsidized employment and transitional jobs programs seek to increase employment and earnings among individuals who have not been able to find employment on their own. First-hand accounts of participants’ experiences in these programs can inform efforts to improve long-term employment outcomes for various “hard-to-employ” populations.

A quantitative analysis of correlates of English learner success in California

Individual Author: 
Betts, Julian
Bachofer, Karen Volz
Hayes, Joseph
Hill, Laura
Lee, Andrew
Zau, Andrew

The paper uses longitudinal student data to study the correlates of academic progress of English Learners (ELs) in the Los Angeles and San Diego Unified School Districts, which together account for roughly 15% of ELs in California and 5% in the nation. We focus on two types of ELs of special policy concern – Long Term ELs who have completed at least five years in the district without being reclassified as English-fluent, and Late Arriving ELs who arrive in the district during secondary school with low levels of English proficiency.

Leading the way: Characteristics and early experiences of selected Early Head Start programs. Volume II: Program profiles

Individual Author: 
Berlin, Lisa J.
Kisker, Ellen Eliason
Love, John M.
Raikes, Helen
Boller, Kimberly
Paulsell, Diane
Rosenberg, Linda
Coolahan, Kathleen

This volume and its companion volumes are the first of two reports designed to share the experiences of the 17 Early Head Start research programs with others. The first report focuses on the programs early in their implementation (fall 1997), approximately two years after they were funded and one year after they began serving families. Volume I examines the characteristics and experiences of the 17 research programs from a cross-site perspective, focusing on the similarities and differences among the programs in fall 1997.

Family profiles of cohesion and parenting practices and Latino youth adjustment

Individual Author: 
Bamaca-Colbert, Mayra Y.
Gonzales-Backen, Melinda
Henry, Carolyn S.
Kim, Peter S.Y.
Zapata Roblyer, Martha
Plunkett, Scott W.
Sands, Tovah

Using a sample of 279 (52% female) Latino youth in 9th grade (M = 14.57, SD = .56), we examined profiles of family cohesion and parenting practices and their relation to youth adjustment. The results of latent profile analyses revealed four family profiles: Engaged, Supportive, Intrusive, and Disengaged. Latino youth in the Supportive family profile showed most positive adjustment (highest self-esteem and lowest depressive symptoms), followed by youth in the Engaged family profile. Youth in the Intrusive and Disengaged profiles showed the lowest levels of positive adjustment.

Behavioral Intervention Materials Compendium

Individual Author: 
Anzelone, Caitlin
Dechausay, Nadine
Alemany, Xavier

The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project conducted 15 randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions across eight states, in the domains of work support, child support, and child care. BIAS used a systematic approach called “behavioral diagnosis and design” to develop the interventions and their associated materials.

A social capital approach to identifying correlates of perceived social support among homeless youth

Individual Author: 
Barman-Adhikari, Anamika
Bowen, Elizabeth
Bender, Kimberly
Brown, Samanta
Rice, Eric

Background

The ability of homeless youth to accumulate resources through their personal relationships with others (i.e. social capital) is often associated with improved outcomes across multiple domains. Despite growing evidence documenting the heterogeneity of homeless youths’ relationships, many youth still experience adversities or lack access to resources. Thus, a more comprehensive investigation of homeless youths’ sources of social capital and the factors associated with these networks is needed.

Objective

Youth Count! Process study

Individual Author: 
Pergamit, Mike
Cunningham, Mary K.
Burt, Martha R.
Lee, Pamela
Howell, Brent
Dumlao Bertumen, Kassie

Homelessness among unaccompanied youth is a hidden problem: the number of young people who experience homelessness each year is largely unknown. To improve the national response to youth homelessness, policymakers need better data on the magnitude of the problem. Youth Count! is a Federal interagency initiative that aims to improve counts of unaccompanied homeless youth. Nine communities participated in the initiative by expanding their annual homeless point-in-time efforts to increase coverage of homeless youth.

How effective are different approaches aiming to increase employment retention and advancement? Final impacts for twelve models

Individual Author: 
Hendra, Richard
Dillman, Keri-Nicole
Hamilton, Gayle
Lundquist, Erika
Martinson, Karin
Wavelet, Melissa
Hill, Aaron
Williams, Sonya

Research completed since the 1980s has yielded substantial knowledge about how to help welfare recipients and other low-income individuals prepare for and find jobs. Many participants in these successful job preparation and placement programs, however, ended up in unstable, low-paying jobs, and little was known about how to effectively help them keep employment and advance in their jobs.