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A roadmap to reducing child poverty

Individual Author: 
Dreyer, Benard P.
James-Brown, Christine

This presentation was given at the 57th National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Workshop in 2019. The presentation, moderated by Edith Kealey, provides an overview of opportunities to reduce child poverty via measure such as expanding tax credits and food assistance programs and the impact of various potential packages of programs, including a case study of a package employed in Louisiana. 

Overall and heterogeneous achievement effects of the Louisiana scholarship program

Individual Author: 
Wolf, Patrick J.
Mills, Jonathan N.
Lee, Matthew

The Louisiana Scholarship Program (LSP) is a school voucher program that offers publicly-funded scholarships to students from economically-disadvantaged families to attend a participating private school of their choice. Originally launched as a pilot project in New Orleans in 2008, the initiative was expanded statewide in 2012. A total of 9,736 eligible students applied to the voucher program for the 2012-13 school year and 5,296 received LSP vouchers. Market theory suggests that student outcomes should improve when educational choices are expanded.

Employment equity: Louisiana’s path to inclusive prosperity

Individual Author: 
Crowder Jr., James A.
Scoggins, Justin
Treuhaft, Sarah

While Louisiana’s economy has improved in recent years, people of color are still disproportionately represented among the state’s economically insecure. Men of color face particular barriers to employment due to discrimination and gaps in work-based skills. If full employment was achieved across all gender and racial groups, Louisiana's economy could be $3.5 billion stronger each year. Investing in men of color and critical education and training systems for Louisiana’s workforce will shift the state toward a course for greater prosperity for all.

Federal and local efforts to support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness

Individual Author: 
Knas, Emily
Stagner, Matthew
Bradley, M.C.

The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

Lessons from a federal initiative to build capacity to end youth homelessness

Individual Author: 
Klein Vogel, Lisa
Bradley, M. C.

This brief discusses the capacity strategy associated with "The Framework to End Youth Homelessness: A Resource Text for Dialogue and Action," (USICH, 2013) (herafter referred to as the “Framework”) and how the strategy was implemented by YARH Phase I grantees (Figure 1). This framework expanded on the 2010 strategic plan, “Opening Doors,” which was geared toward preventing homelessness among multiple populations (USICH, 2010). The 2013 framework targets the specific challenges and needs of homeless adolescents as they transition to adulthood.

Reducing homelessness among youth with child welfare involvement: An analysis of phase I planning processes in a multi-phase grant

Individual Author: 
Stagner, Matthew
Vogel, Lisa Klein
Knas, Emily
Fung, Nickie
Worthington, Julie
Bradley, M. C.
D'Angelo, Angela
Gothro, Andrew
Powers, Courtney

Youth and young adults with child welfare involvement face significant challenges in their transition to adulthood—challenges that increase their risk of becoming homeless. Evidence on “what works” for youth in foster care or young adults formerly in foster care is limited (Courtney et al. 2007).

Sustaining efforts to reduce youth homelessness without additional federal funding

Individual Author: 
Vogel, Lisa Klein
Fung, Nickie
Bradley, M. C.

This brief discusses how 7 of the 12 Phase I grantees who were not awarded Phase II grants are working to sustain efforts in their community to prevent homelessness based on the planning accomplished during Phase I. Sustainability efforts were discussed in individual phone calls with the Phase I project director and/or project manager in November and December 2015, as most Phase I grantees were preparing to submit their final Phase I grant report. (Author summary)

 

Lead levels among children who live in public housing

Individual Author: 
Rabito, Felicia A.
Shorter, Charles
White, LuAnn E.

Background. Exposure to lead hazards is a serious health concern for inner-city children. In the United States, the greatest contributor to an elevated lead level is lead exposure in the home. There are federal regulations to protect children in public housing developments from exposure to lead paint. The efficacy of these regulations has not been examined.

You shall not pass: The use of evaluation tollgates in building evidence for social programs

Individual Author: 
Woolverton, Maria
Bradley, M.C.
Gabel, George
Melz, Heidi

This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). Too often, programs are prematurely evaluated without a planning phase to build a program’s evaluation capacity. However, there is growing consensus that prior to summative evaluation programs should undergo an intermediate step, referred to as “evaluation tollgates,” to determine whether programs are well-implemented and truly ready for rigorous evaluation.

Implementation and early training outcomes of the High Growth Job Training Initiative: Final report

Individual Author: 
Lauren Eyster
Nightingale, Demetra Smith
Barnow, Burt S.
O'Brien, Carolyn T.
Trutko, John
Kuehn, Daniel

The High Growth Job Training Initiative (HGJTI) was a national grant program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), Employment and Training Administration (ETA). Between 2001 and 2007, more than 160 grants were awarded to establish industry-focused job training and related projects designed to meet the industry's workforce challenges. This report is the third and final in a series from the national evaluation of the HGJTI conducted by the Urban Institute, the Institute for Policy Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and Capital Research Corporation.