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The Chicago School Readiness Project: Examining the long-term impacts of an early childhood intervention

Individual Author: 
Watts, Tyler W.
Gandhi, Jill
Ibrahim, Deanna A.
Masucci, Michael D.
Raver, C. Cybele

The current paper reports long-term treatment impact estimates for a randomized evaluation of an early childhood intervention designed to promote children's developmental outcomes and improve the quality of Head Start centers serving high-violence and high-crime areas in inner-city Chicago. Initial evaluations of end-of-preschool data reported that the program led to reductions in child behavioral problems and gains in measures of executive function and academic achievement. For this report, we analyzed adolescent follow-up data taken 10 to 11 years after program completion.

Bridging the opportunity divide for low-income youth: Implementation and early impacts of the Year Up program

Individual Author: 
Fein, David
Hamadyk, Jill

This report assesses the implementation and early impacts of Year Up, a national sectoral training program for young adults aged 18-24. Year Up aims to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete training leading to employment in high-demand, well-paying occupations.

Employment after prison: A longitudinal study of releasees in three states

Individual Author: 
Visher, Christy
Debus-Sherrill, Sara
Yahner, Jennifer

In this brief, we explore the reality of finding employment after prison from the perspective of 740 former male prisoners in Illinois, Ohio, and Texas. Interviews were conducted as part of a comprehensive, longitudinal study entitled Returning Home: Understanding the Challenges of Prisoner Reentry. Eight months after prison, 65 percent of respondents had been employed at some point, but only 45 percent were currently employed. Those who held a job while in prison or participated in job-training programs had better employment outcomes after release.

Employer engagement by community-based organizations: Meeting the needs of job seekers with barriers to success in the labor market

Individual Author: 
Spaulding, Shayne
Blount, David

Employers need skilled workers to fill open jobs. Yet some workers face barriers to employment, even as the national unemployment rate dips to its lowest level in nearly two decades. These workers might face such challenges as a lack of skills, gaps in employment, or previous involvement in the criminal justice system.

Understanding the intersection between TANF and Refugee Cash Assistance

Individual Author: 
Elkin, Sam
Farrell, Mary
Koralek, Robin
Engle, Hannah

Since 1975, the United States has resettled more than three million refugees whose diversity of skills, education, and culture requires that public and private organizations assisting them be able to provide a wide range of services. Upon arrival in the United States, two federally funded cash assistance programs help low-income refugees on their path to self-sufficiency: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for those with dependent minor children and Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA) for those who do not qualify for TANF.

Improving child care subsidy programs: Findings from the Work Support Strategies evaluation

Individual Author: 
Hahn, Heather
Rohacek, Monica
Isaacs, Julia

Child care subsidies are critical for the well-being of low-income families, including parents’ economic success and children’s development. To inform state efforts to simplify access to child care subsidies and improve service delivery, this report highlights steps taken and lessons learned by five states that participated in the Work Support Strategies initiative between 2012 and 2015. These states worked to improve child care subsidy access and retention, efficiency of service delivery, quality of client service, and alignment with other benefit programs.

Instituto del Progreso Latino's Carreras en Salud Program: Implementation and early impacts report

Individual Author: 
Martinson, Karin
Copson, Elizabeth
Gardiner, Karen
Kitrosser, Daniel

This report documents the implementation and early impacts of the Carreras en Salud (Careers in Health) program, operated by Instituto del Progreso Latino, in Chicago, Illinois. The Carreras en Salud program is one promising effort aimed at helping low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete occupational training that can lead to increased employment and higher earnings. A distinctive feature of this program is its focus on training for low-income Latinos for employment in healthcare occupations, primarily Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) and Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN).

Instituto del Progreso Latino's Carreras en Salud (Careers in Health) Program: Implementation and early impact report Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE)

Individual Author: 
Martinson, Karin
Copson, Elizabeth
Gardiner, Karen
Kitrosser, Daniel

This report documents the implementation and early impacts of the Carreras en Salud (Careers in Health) program, operated by Instituto del Progreso Latino, in Chicago, Illinois. The Carreras en Salud program is one promising effort aimed at helping low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete occupational training that can lead to increased employment and higher earnings. A distinctive feature of this program is its focus on training for low-income Latinos for employment in healthcare occupations, primarily Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) and Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN).

New evidence on integrated career pathways: Final impact report for Accelerating Opportunity

Individual Author: 
Anderson, Theresa
Kuehn, Daniel
Eyster, Lauren
Barnow, Burt S.
Lerman, Robert I.

This final impact report describes the effect of Accelerating Opportunity (AO) on education and employment outcomes for underprepared adult learners. Designed and led by Jobs for the Future and national partners, AO allowed adults with low basic skills to enroll in integrated career pathways at community and technical colleges. The quasi-experimental impact analysis shows that AO students earned more credentials while taking fewer credits, suggesting more efficient course-taking and accelerated learning.

Connecting to safety and stability: Domestic violence needs assessment of Chicago

Individual Author: 
O'Brien, Mary

Domestic violence is pervasive. Approximately 1 in 3 women have experienced physical violence by an intimate partner in the United States. It is estimated that more than 2 million Illinoisans have experienced domestic violence in their lifetime. Domestic violence impacts individuals and communities throughout Chicago. A comprehensive assessment of the domestic violence response system, however, has not been conducted in Chicago since 2007.