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Supporting family child care and quality improvement: Findings from an exploratory survey of Illinois child care resource and referral agency staff

Individual Author: 
Bromer, Juliet
Weaver, Corinne

Improved quality in home-based child care (family child care and family, friend, and neighbor care) is increasingly recognized as a vital component of early care and education service systems in the U.S. and abroad and is a target of recent federal and state policy initiatives in the U.S. This article presents data from a statewide survey of 73 child care resource and referral specialists across Illinois who work with family child care providers on a regular basis through home visiting, training, and technical assistance.

Building a stronger safety net: Local organizations and the challenges of serving immigrants in the suburbs

Individual Author: 
Roth, Benjamin J.
Gonzales, Roberto G.
Lesniewski, Jacob

Just as more poor people in America now live in suburbs than in primary cities, immigrants are more likely to live in suburbs than in the urban core. This study examines the nonprofit safety net in select Chicago suburban municipalities to assess the capacity and accessibility of these service providers relative to the location and need of low-income immigrants. We identify differences between immigrant service providers and mainstream organizations, particularly their willingness and ability to reach out to and serve immigrants and to analyze their role as mediating institutions.

Helping families involved in the child welfare system achieve housing stability

Individual Author: 
Cunningham, Mary K.
Pergamit, Mike
Baum, Abigail
Luna, Jessica

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)‘s Family Unification Program (FUP) provides low-income families involved in the child welfare system with housing vouchers. FUP is an important vehicle for understanding three issues: (1) the overlap between the child welfare system, housing, and homelessness; (2) how to provide housing to vulnerable, high-need families; and (3) how to facilitate cross-system partnerships between public housing agencies and child welfare agencies.

The Chicago School Readiness Project: Examining the long-term impacts of an early childhood intervention

Individual Author: 
Watts, Tyler W.
Gandhi, Jill
Ibrahim, Deanna A.
Masucci, Michael D.
Raver, C. Cybele

The current paper reports long-term treatment impact estimates for a randomized evaluation of an early childhood intervention designed to promote children's developmental outcomes and improve the quality of Head Start centers serving high-violence and high-crime areas in inner-city Chicago. Initial evaluations of end-of-preschool data reported that the program led to reductions in child behavioral problems and gains in measures of executive function and academic achievement. For this report, we analyzed adolescent follow-up data taken 10 to 11 years after program completion.

Bridging the opportunity divide for low-income youth: Implementation and early impacts of the Year Up program

Individual Author: 
Fein, David
Hamadyk, Jill

This report assesses the implementation and early impacts of Year Up, a national sectoral training program for young adults aged 18-24. Year Up aims to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete training leading to employment in high-demand, well-paying occupations.

Employment after prison: A longitudinal study of releasees in three states

Individual Author: 
Visher, Christy
Debus-Sherrill, Sara
Yahner, Jennifer

In this brief, we explore the reality of finding employment after prison from the perspective of 740 former male prisoners in Illinois, Ohio, and Texas. Interviews were conducted as part of a comprehensive, longitudinal study entitled Returning Home: Understanding the Challenges of Prisoner Reentry. Eight months after prison, 65 percent of respondents had been employed at some point, but only 45 percent were currently employed. Those who held a job while in prison or participated in job-training programs had better employment outcomes after release.

Implementation and early training outcomes of the High Growth Job Training Initiative: Final report

Individual Author: 
Lauren Eyster
Nightingale, Demetra Smith
Barnow, Burt S.
O'Brien, Carolyn T.
Trutko, John
Kuehn, Daniel

The High Growth Job Training Initiative (HGJTI) was a national grant program administered by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), Employment and Training Administration (ETA). Between 2001 and 2007, more than 160 grants were awarded to establish industry-focused job training and related projects designed to meet the industry's workforce challenges. This report is the third and final in a series from the national evaluation of the HGJTI conducted by the Urban Institute, the Institute for Policy Studies at Johns Hopkins University, and Capital Research Corporation.

Employer engagement by community-based organizations: Meeting the needs of job seekers with barriers to success in the labor market

Individual Author: 
Spaulding, Shayne
Blount, David

Employers need skilled workers to fill open jobs. Yet some workers face barriers to employment, even as the national unemployment rate dips to its lowest level in nearly two decades. These workers might face such challenges as a lack of skills, gaps in employment, or previous involvement in the criminal justice system.

Understanding the intersection between TANF and Refugee Cash Assistance

Individual Author: 
Elkin, Sam
Farrell, Mary
Koralek, Robin
Engle, Hannah

Since 1975, the United States has resettled more than three million refugees whose diversity of skills, education, and culture requires that public and private organizations assisting them be able to provide a wide range of services. Upon arrival in the United States, two federally funded cash assistance programs help low-income refugees on their path to self-sufficiency: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) for those with dependent minor children and Refugee Cash Assistance (RCA) for those who do not qualify for TANF.