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“We get a chance to show impact": Program staff reflect on participating in a rigorous, multi-site evaluation

Individual Author: 
Hamadyk, Jill
Gardiner, Karen

This brief summarizes the experiences of leaders and staff from eight career pathways programs that participated in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Evaluation. Based on firsthand accounts, the brief describes how staff perceived the benefits of participating in the randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluation, the challenges they experienced—in particular recruiting study participants and implementing its random assignment procedures—and how they overcame challenges. The brief then describes lessons staff learned from participating in PACE.

Academic medical centers and equity in specialty care access for children

Individual Author: 
Bisgaier, Joanna
Polsky, Daniel
Rhodes, Karin V.

Objective: To test whether specialty clinics’ academic medical center (AMC) affiliation was associated with equity in scheduling appointments for children with public vs private insurance. Academic medical centers are safety-net providers of specialty medical care and it is unknown whether equitable access is afforded by AMCs across insurance conditions.

Design: Audit study data were linked to data describing audited clinics.

Setting: Specialty clinics serving children residing in Cook County, Illinois.

Association of Medicaid expansion with access to rehabilitative care in adult trauma patients

Individual Author: 
Zogg, Cheryl K.
Scott, John W.
Metcalfe, David
Gluck, Abbe R.
Curfman, Gregory D.
Davis, Kimberly A.
Dimick, Justin B.
Haider, Adil H.

Importance Trauma is a leading cause of death and disability for patients of all ages, many of whom are also among the most likely to be uninsured. Passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was intended to improve access to care through improvements in insurance. However, despite nationally reported changes in the payer mix of patients, the extent of the law’s impact on insurance coverage among trauma patients is unknown, as is its success in improving trauma outcomes and promoting increased access to rehabilitation.

Efficiency and equity of secondary prevention: Evidence from lead screening in Illinois

Individual Author: 
Gazze, Ludovica

Screening for environmental and health hazards can help governments target scarce resources for remediation whenever complete preventative abatement of pollutants and toxins is not cost-effective. For example, child lead poisoning prevention programs throughout the US first identify children exposed to lead through a blood test and then inspect homes to find and remediate exposure sources.

Analysis plan for the PACE intermediate (three-year) follow-up study

Individual Author: 
Judkins, David
Fein, David
Buron, Larry

The Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) evaluation is a study of nine promising programs that use a “career pathways” framework for increasing education, employment, and self-sufficiency among low-income individuals and families. Funded by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, PACE will include three points of participant follow-up—at 18 months, three years, and six years after random assignment.

The medicalization of poverty in the lives of low-income black mothers and children

Individual Author: 
Mendenhall, Ruby

Scholars are beginning to use the concept medicalization of poverty to theorize how the United States spends large amounts of money on illnesses related to poverty but invests much less in preventing these illnesses and the conditions that create them (e.g., economic insecurity, housing instability, continuous exposure to violence, and racism). This study examines the connection between poverty, disease burden and health-related costs through the in-depth interviews of 86 Black mothers living in neighborhoods with high levels of violence on the South Side of Chicago.

The challenge of repeating success in a changing world: Final report on the Center for Employment Training Replication Sites

Individual Author: 
Miller, Cynthia
Bos, Johannes
Porter, Kristin
Tseng, Fannie M.
Abe, Yasuyo

The Center for Employment Training (CET), headquartered in San Jose, California, gained the attention of policymakers in the early 1990s, when it proved to be the only training program in two major evaluations (one of which, JOBSTART, targeted disadvantaged youth) to produce large positive effects on participants’ employment and earnings. Such documented success is rare among employment and training programs in general, but it is especially unusual among programs serving youth.

Lessons from a federal initiative to build capacity to end youth homelessness

Individual Author: 
Klein Vogel, Lisa
Bradley, M. C.

This brief discusses the capacity strategy associated with "The Framework to End Youth Homelessness: A Resource Text for Dialogue and Action," (USICH, 2013) (herafter referred to as the “Framework”) and how the strategy was implemented by YARH Phase I grantees (Figure 1). This framework expanded on the 2010 strategic plan, “Opening Doors,” which was geared toward preventing homelessness among multiple populations (USICH, 2010). The 2013 framework targets the specific challenges and needs of homeless adolescents as they transition to adulthood.

Reducing homelessness among youth with child welfare involvement: An analysis of phase I planning processes in a multi-phase grant

Individual Author: 
Stagner, Matthew
Vogel, Lisa Klein
Knas, Emily
Fung, Nickie
Worthington, Julie
Bradley, M. C.
D'Angelo, Angela
Gothro, Andrew
Powers, Courtney

Youth and young adults with child welfare involvement face significant challenges in their transition to adulthood—challenges that increase their risk of becoming homeless. Evidence on “what works” for youth in foster care or young adults formerly in foster care is limited (Courtney et al. 2007).

Transforming the lives of parents and children together: Illinois Kids Count

Individual Author: 
Sabol, Terri J.
Eckrich Sommer, Teresa
Chase-Lansdale, Patricia Lindsay

Children who live in poverty are at a significant disadvantage in terms of their educational and economic trajectories. At school entry, low-income children are almost a year behind in their higher-income peers, and this gap remains as children progress in school. (Author abstract)