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Predicting repeated and persistent family homelessness: Do families’ characteristics and experiences matter?

Individual Author: 
Glendening, Zachary
Shinn, Marybeth

Research indicates that most families using emergency shelters stay briefly—one to four or five months—and rarely return (Culhane et al. 2007). However, some families remain homeless for long periods of time or experience repeated episodes of homelessness. These families may have characteristics and service needs that differ from those of families who leave shelter quickly and permanently. Communities and homelessness practitioners might benefit from identifying those families’ characteristics and experiences to improve targeting of services.

Homeless families’ experiences with public benefit programs, employment, and family transitions

Individual Author: 
Benton, Amanda
Dunton, Lauren
Khadduri, Jill
Walton, Douglas

These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S.

Successful transitions from foster care to adulthood: The role of social capital

Individual Author: 
DeBaryshe,B.D
Stern, I.R.

Social capital consists of the network of relationships we have with key people in our lives (family, friends, classmates, neighbors, co-workers, etc.) and the exchange of emotional, social, and material support that these relationships provide. People with high levels of social capital are happier, healthier, and more resilient to stress. Social capital is important for the healthy development of all young people and is especially critical for youth in foster care and those transitioning to young adulthood.

Behavioral health improvements over time among adults in families experiencing homelessness

Individual Author: 
Shinn, Marybeth
Gubits, Daniel
Dunton, Lauren

The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS. 

Effects of the Affordable Care Act on part-time employment: Early evidence

Individual Author: 
Dillender, Marcus
Heinrich, Carolyn
Houseman, Susan

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) requires employers with at least 50 full-time-equivalent employees to offer “affordable” health insurance to employees working 30 or more hours per week. If employers do not comply with the mandate, they may face substantial financial penalties. Employers can potentially circumvent the mandate by reducing weekly hours below the 30-hour threshold or by using other nonstandard employment arrangements (direct-hire temporaries, agency temporaries, small contractors, and independent contractors).

Family Options Study: 3-year impacts of housing and services interventions for homeless families

Individual Author: 
Gubits, Daniel
Shinn, Marybeth
Wood, Michelle
Bell, Stephen
Dastrup, Samuel
Solari, Claudia D.
Brown, Scott R.
McInnis, Debi
McCall, Tom
Kattel, Utsav

The Family Options Study: Three-year Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families documents the outcomes of the 2,282 formerly homeless study families approximately 37 months after having been randomly assigned to one of four housing and/or services interventions.

Patterns of benefit receipt among families who experience homelessness

Individual Author: 
Khadduri, Jill
Burt, Martha R.
Walton, Douglas

What are the patterns of benefit receipt among families who experience homelessness? This brief uses data collected for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Family Options Study to analyze patterns of receipt of TANF cash assistance, SNAP food assistance, and publicly funded health insurance benefits among these families, with a focus on the characteristics of those receiving and not receiving benefits. The brief:

Is subsidized childcare associated with lower risk of grade retention for low-income children?

Individual Author: 
Shattuck, Rachel M.

This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop discusses the likelihood of low-income children who received federal Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) - subsidized care in early childhood - being held back in school, from kindergarten onward. Additionally, this presentation explores whether this association is particularly pronounced for low-income Black and Hispanic children relative to low-income children from other race/ethnic groups.