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School readiness gains made by ethnically diverse children in poverty attending center-based childcare and public school pre-kindergarten programs

Individual Author: 
Winsler, Adam
Tran, Henry
Hartman, Suzanne C.
Madigan, Amy L.
Manfra, Louis
Bleiker, Charles

Although intensive early childhood interventions and high quality preschool programs have been shown to foster children's school readiness, little is known about the school readiness gains made by ethnically and linguistically diverse children in poverty receiving subsidies to attend center-based childcare or those in public school pre-kindergarten programs.

Child care in poor communities: Early learning effects of type, quality, and stability

Individual Author: 
Loeb, Susanna
Fuller, Bruce
Kagan, Sharon Lynn
Carrol, Bidemi

Young children in poor communities are spending more hours in nonparental care because of policy reforms and expansion of early childhood programs. Studies show positive effects of high-quality center-based care on children's cognitive growth. Yet, little is known about the effects of center care typically available in poor communities or the effects of home-based care. Using a sample of children who were between 12 and 42 months when their mothers entered welfare-to-work programs, this paper finds positive cognitive effects for children in center care.

Developmental trajectories of acculturation: Links with family functioning and mental health in recent-immigrant Hispanic adolescents

Individual Author: 
Schwartz, Seth J.
Unger, Jennifer B.
Zamboanga, Byron L.
Córdova, David
Mason, Craig A.
Huang, Shi
Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes
Lorenzo-Blanco, Elma I.
Des Rosiers, Sabrina
Soto, Daniel W.
Villamar, Juan A.
Pattarroyo, Monica
Lizzi, Karina M.
Szapocznik, José

The present study was designed to examine acculturative changes, and their effects on mental health and family functioning, in recent-immigrant Hispanic adolescents. A sample of 302 Hispanic adolescents was assessed five times over a 2.5-year period. Participants completed measures of Hispanic and U.S. practices, collectivist and individualist values, and ethnic and U.S. identity at each timepoint. Baseline and Time 5 levels of mental health and family functioning were also assessed. Latent class growth analyses produced two-class solutions for practices, values, and identifications.

Association of Medicaid expansion with access to rehabilitative care in adult trauma patients

Individual Author: 
Zogg, Cheryl K.
Scott, John W.
Metcalfe, David
Gluck, Abbe R.
Curfman, Gregory D.
Davis, Kimberly A.
Dimick, Justin B.
Haider, Adil H.

Importance Trauma is a leading cause of death and disability for patients of all ages, many of whom are also among the most likely to be uninsured. Passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was intended to improve access to care through improvements in insurance. However, despite nationally reported changes in the payer mix of patients, the extent of the law’s impact on insurance coverage among trauma patients is unknown, as is its success in improving trauma outcomes and promoting increased access to rehabilitation.

Federal and local efforts to support Youth At-Risk of Homelessness

Individual Author: 
Knas, Emily
Stagner, Matthew
Bradley, M.C.

The Children’s Bureau funded a multi-phase grant program referred to as Youth At-Risk of Homelessness (YARH) to build the evidence base on what works to prevent homelessness among youth and young adults who have been involved in the child welfare system. To date, there is very little evidence on how to meet the needs of this population.

Developing American Job Centers in jails: Implementation of the Linking to Employment Activities Pre-Release (LEAP) grants

Individual Author: 
Bellotti, Jeanne
Sattar, Samina
Gould-Werth, Alix
Berk, Jillian
Gutierrez, Ivette
Stein, Jillian
Betesh, Hannah
Ochoa, Lindsay
Wiegand, Andrew

To help individuals successfully reenter society after time in jail, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded $10 million in grants to 20 local workforce development boards (LWDBs) in June 2015 for the Linking to Employment Activities PreRelease (LEAP) initiative. Central to the LEAP initiative was creating jail-based American Job Centers (AJCs) with direct linkages to community-based AJCs.

Providing job search support for women over 50; Interim report on the implementation of AARP Foundation's Back To Work 50+: Women's Economic Stability Initiative

Individual Author: 
Betesh, Hannah
Cruz, Mayte
DeFever, Renatta
Henderson-Frakes, Jennifer
Kogan, Deborah
Paprocki, Anne

In 2014, the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) selected AARP Foundation to receive a three-year grant under the Social Innovation Fund (SIF) to operate and evaluate the Women’s Economic Stability Initiative (WESI) in multiple locations.

Child support cooperation requirements in child care subsidy programs and SNAP: Key policy considerations

Individual Author: 
Selekman, Rebekah
Holcomb, Pamela

The EMPOWERED study, conducted on behalf of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, examines the use of performance measures, work requirements, and child support cooperation requirements across human services programs. This issue brief examines the use of child support cooperation requirements in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) program and child care subsidy programs funded under the Child Care Development Fund (CCDF). (Author summary)

The challenge of repeating success in a changing world: Final report on the Center for Employment Training Replication Sites

Individual Author: 
Miller, Cynthia
Bos, Johannes
Porter, Kristin
Tseng, Fannie M.
Abe, Yasuyo

The Center for Employment Training (CET), headquartered in San Jose, California, gained the attention of policymakers in the early 1990s, when it proved to be the only training program in two major evaluations (one of which, JOBSTART, targeted disadvantaged youth) to produce large positive effects on participants’ employment and earnings. Such documented success is rare among employment and training programs in general, but it is especially unusual among programs serving youth.

Final report on the Youth Transition Demonstration Evaluation

Individual Author: 
Fraker, Thomas
Mamun, Arif
Honeycutt, Todd
Thompkins, Allison
Valentine, Erin Jacobs

Under contract to SSA, Mathematica Policy Research conducted a rigorous evaluation of the Youth Transition Demonstration (YTD) projects using a random assignment evaluation design. Across the six project sites, more than 5,000 youth enrolled in the evaluation and were randomly assigned to either a treatment group that could participate in the YTD projects or a control group that could not. Mathematica and its partners in the evaluation conducted site-specific analysis to assess the impacts of the interventions one year and three years after youth enrolled in the evaluation.