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Des Moines

“We get a chance to show impact": Program staff reflect on participating in a rigorous, multi-site evaluation

Individual Author: 
Hamadyk, Jill
Gardiner, Karen

This brief summarizes the experiences of leaders and staff from eight career pathways programs that participated in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) Evaluation. Based on firsthand accounts, the brief describes how staff perceived the benefits of participating in the randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluation, the challenges they experienced—in particular recruiting study participants and implementing its random assignment procedures—and how they overcame challenges. The brief then describes lessons staff learned from participating in PACE.

Analysis plan for the PACE intermediate (three-year) follow-up study

Individual Author: 
Judkins, David
Fein, David
Buron, Larry

The Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) evaluation is a study of nine promising programs that use a “career pathways” framework for increasing education, employment, and self-sufficiency among low-income individuals and families. Funded by the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, PACE will include three points of participant follow-up—at 18 months, three years, and six years after random assignment.

Des Moines area community college Workforce Training Academy Connect program: Implementation and early impact report

Individual Author: 
Hamadyk, Jill
Zeidenberg, Matthew

This report documents the implementation and early impacts of the Workforce Training Academy Connect (WTA Connect) program, operated by Des Moines Area Community College (DMACC) in Des Moines, Iowa. WTA Connect aimed to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete occupational training that can lead to increased employment and higher earnings. It is one of nine career pathways programs being evaluated under the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families.

Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) technical supplement to the evaluation design report: Impact analysis plan

Individual Author: 
Abt Associates Inc.

This report provides detailed information about the planned impact analyses for the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) project. The PACE Impact Study is designed to answer questions about the overall program effectiveness for the nine programs in PACE, each involving a different configuration of career pathways design components.

Career pathways intermediate outcomes study: Plan for cost-benefit analyses

Individual Author: 
Dastrup, Samuel
Burnett, Kimberly
Buron, Larry

This document lays out a plan for the cost-benefit analyses (CBAs) that will be conducted for up to six of the nine Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) programs. The Career Pathways Intermediate Outcomes (CPIO) study is evaluating the intermediate impacts and outcomes of the PACE programs. The CBAs cover the three-year period after study enrollment.

Financial services in the Making Connections neighborhoods

Individual Author: 
Woolley, Mark

This report analyzes survey data about the use of financial services by families living in the 10 Making Connections cities across the United States. The report evaluates resident responses by their use of bank services, check cashing services, payday lenders, pawn shops and credit cards, as well as how they would respond to financial emergencies. It correlates how factors such as race/ethnicity, immigrant status, income, employment level, and neighborhood of residence influenced the use of financial services. (Author abstract)

Center for Working Families at community colleges: Clearing the financial barriers to student success, case studies

Individual Author: 
Liston, Cynthia D.
Donnan, Robert

Casey's Center for Working Families (CWF) partnered with community college programs across the county to help low-income students access, navigate and complete their community college courses. Detailed case studies show how five of these programs are making a difference. (Author abstract)

Risk Factors for College Success: Insights from adults in nine career pathways programs

Individual Author: 
Fein, David

The analysis of data from 3,719 students in the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) evaluation highlights risk factors that disadvantaged students face in college success. The data indicates a strong relationship between college success and past educational experience; economic status; expected work hours; and expected part-time status. Findings also affirm the role of psycho-social factors - especially determination and confidence - in college success. Each program targeted and recruited different segments of the national population of disadvantaged adults.

Suburbia, poverty, and local political stewards: Examining suburban economic disadvantage, suburban poverty indicators, and the role of suburban mayoral leadership

Individual Author: 
Smith, Abi J.

In almost mythical proportions, suburbia in America has long symbolized opportunity as well as an escape from the real (and imagined) traumas of urban centers. It has also, by and large, been synonymous with the financial stability of its residents. The suburbanization of jobs and the steady decline of cities have only served to reinforce the notion that the suburbs are a collective oasis of resources, amenities, and middle-class immunity to social and economic ills.

The moral economy of debt: Race, ethnicity and perceptions of fairness in credit markets for the poor

Individual Author: 
Nuñez, Stephen Charles

In this dissertation, I explore the role of values and moral judgments in credit markets. I focus on the frequenting of “fringe banks,” controversial institutions that serve those who have limited access to mainstream credit markets as a result of poverty and/or poor/no credit history. Among other intriguing results, I find compelling evidence that there are persistent statistical differences in payday and pawn loan usage across racial and ethnic groups that cannot be explained by disparities in wealth and credit access.