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Association of maternal depressive symptoms and offspring physical health in low-income families

Individual Author: 
Thompson, Sarah M.
Jiang, Lu
Hammen, Constance
Whaley, Shannon E.

Objectives The present study sought to examine the association between maternal depressive symptoms and characteristics of offspring physical health, including health status, health behaviors, and healthcare utilization, among low-income families. Maternal engagement was explored as a mediator of observed effects. Methods Cross-sectional survey data from a community sample of 4589 low-income women and their preschool-age children participating in the WIC program in Los Angeles County were analyzed using logistic, Poisson, and zero-inflated negative binomial regression.

Implementation and relative impacts of two job search assistance programs in Sacramento County, California

Individual Author: 
Martinson, Karin
Harvill, Eleanor
Saunders, Correne
Litwok, Daniel
Meckstroth, Alicia
Bates, Steve

This report describes the implementation and impact study findings from an evaluation of the relative effectiveness of two approaches to providing job search assistance (JSA) to cash assistance recipients in Sacramento County, California. From 2016 to 2018, the Sacramento County’s Department of Human Assistance operated two JSA programs for cash assistance recipients who were required to work: Standard Job Club and Fast Track Job Club.

A new response to child support noncompliance: Introducing the Procedural Justice-Informed Alternatives to Contempt project

Individual Author: 
Mage, Caroline
Baird, Peter
Miller, Cynthia

This study brief describes an alternative to the civil contempt process intended to increase engagement and consistent and reliable payments among noncompliant noncustodial parents. The Procedural Justice-Informed Alternatives to Contempt (PJAC) demonstration project was developed by OCSE to adapt and apply principles of procedural justice to child support compliance eforts. Procedural justice is also referred to as procedural fairness.

Trends in California poverty: 2011–2014

Individual Author: 
Wimer, Christopher
Kimberlin, Sara
Danielson, Caroline
Mattingly, Marybeth
Fisher, Jonathan
Bohn, Sarah

The purpose of this report is to describe recent trends in poverty in California. Throughout this report, we will feature a measure that is inspired by the Supplemental Poverty Measure (SPM), as it improves on the Official Poverty Measure (OPM) in important ways. (Author abstract)

 

Extended kin and children's behavioral functioning: Family structure and parental immigrant status

Individual Author: 
Kang, Jeehye
Cohen, Philip N.

Using the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (L.A. FANS), this paper examines the association between the presence of co-resident extended kin and children's internalizing and externalizing behaviors. The paper demonstrates the differential role of extended kin by family structure, as well as across parental immigrant status – specifically, nativity and documentation status. Children in the sample were found to be disadvantaged in extended family households, especially with regard to internalizing behaviors.

In and out of poverty: Episodic poverty and income volatility in the US financial diaries

Individual Author: 
Morduch, Jonathan
Siwicki, Julie

We use data from the US Financial Diaries study to relate episodic poverty to intrayear income volatility and to the availability of government transfers. The US Financial Diaries data track a continuous year’s worth of month-to-month income for 235 low- and moderate-income households, each with at least one employed member, in four regions in the United States. The data provide an unusually granular view of household financial transactions, allowing the documentation of episodic poverty and the attribution of a large share of it to fluctuations in earnings within jobs.

Supportive housing program for homeless families: Foster care outcomes and best practices

Individual Author: 
Lenz-Rashid, Sonja

Purpose
This study is an outcome evaluation of Cottage Housing Incorporated's Serna Village Program (CHI), a supportive housing program serving homeless families in Sacramento, California.

Methods
This quasi-experimental study examined a sample of 293 children and youth who lived with their parents in CHI between 2002 and 2009.

Biological sensitivity to family income: Differential effects on early executive functioning

Individual Author: 
Obradovic, Jelena
Portilla, Ximena A.
Ballard, Parissa J.

The study examined how the interplay between children's cortisol response and family income is related to executive function (EF) skills. The sample included one hundred and two 5- to 6-year-olds (64% minority). EF skills were measured using laboratory tasks and observer ratings. Physiological reactivity was assessed via cortisol response during a laboratory visit. A consistent, positive association between family income and EF skills emerged only for children who showed high cortisol response, a marker of biological sensitivity to context.

Improving employment outcomes: Using innovative goal-oriented strategies in TANF programs

Individual Author: 
Derr, Michelle
McCay, Jonathan
Kauff, Jacqueline F.

New evidence from neuroscience, psychology, and other behavioral sciences suggests that TANF programs may be able to improve participants’ outcomes by applying the science of self-regulation. Self-regulation refers to a foundational set of skills and personality factors that enable people to control their thoughts, emotions, and behavior. It is what helps people set goals, make plans, solve problems, reason, organize, prioritize, initiate tasks, manage time, and persist in and monitor their actions.

Positive parenting, family cohesion, and child social competence among immigrant Latino families

Individual Author: 
Leidy, Melinda S.
Guerra, Nancy G.
Toro, Rosa I.

The relation between positive parenting, family cohesion, and child social competence was examined among Latino families (predominantly from Mexico) who were recent immigrants to the United States. A mixed method study was conducted, including both pre- and post-test self-reported surveys (9-month interval) and qualitative data from focus groups. A total of 282 parents and 282 children (ages 9–12) participated in the survey study.