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Bridgeport

Predicting repeated and persistent family homelessness: Do families’ characteristics and experiences matter?

Individual Author: 
Glendening, Zachary
Shinn, Marybeth

Research indicates that most families using emergency shelters stay briefly—one to four or five months—and rarely return (Culhane et al. 2007). However, some families remain homeless for long periods of time or experience repeated episodes of homelessness. These families may have characteristics and service needs that differ from those of families who leave shelter quickly and permanently. Communities and homelessness practitioners might benefit from identifying those families’ characteristics and experiences to improve targeting of services.

Behavioral health improvements over time among adults in families experiencing homelessness

Individual Author: 
Shinn, Marybeth
Gubits, Daniel
Dunton, Lauren

The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS. 

A randomized controlled trial of Child FIRST: A comprehensive home-based intervention translating research into early childhood practice

Individual Author: 
Lowell, Darcy I.
Carter, Alice S.
Godoy, Leandra
Paulicin, Belinda
Briggs-Gowan, Margaret J.

This randomized, controlled trial was designed to document the effectiveness of Child FIRST (Child and Family Interagency, Resource, Support, and Training), a home-based psychotherapeutic, parent-child intervention embedded in a system of care. Multirisk urban mothers and children, ages 6-36 months (= 157) participated. At the 12-month follow-up, Child FIRST children had improved language (odd ratio [OR] = 4.4) and externalizing symptoms (OR = 4.7) compared to Usual Care children.

The Health Profession Opportunity Grant (HPOG) university partnership 2.0 research grants

Individual Author: 
Gall, Anamita
Wright, Nicole

The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program funds demonstration projects that provide training and education to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. The Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) is evaluating the HPOG Program using a multipronged strategy to examine program implementation, systems change, and outcomes and impacts for participants.

Family Options Study: 3-year impacts of housing and services interventions for homeless families

Individual Author: 
Gubits, Daniel
Shinn, Marybeth
Wood, Michelle
Bell, Stephen
Dastrup, Samuel
Solari, Claudia D.
Brown, Scott R.
McInnis, Debi
McCall, Tom
Kattel, Utsav

The Family Options Study: Three-year Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families documents the outcomes of the 2,282 formerly homeless study families approximately 37 months after having been randomly assigned to one of four housing and/or services interventions.

Patterns of benefit receipt among families who experience homelessness

Individual Author: 
Khadduri, Jill
Burt, Martha R.
Walton, Douglas

What are the patterns of benefit receipt among families who experience homelessness? This brief uses data collected for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Family Options Study to analyze patterns of receipt of TANF cash assistance, SNAP food assistance, and publicly funded health insurance benefits among these families, with a focus on the characteristics of those receiving and not receiving benefits. The brief:

Family Options Study: Short-term impacts of housing and services interventions for homeless families

Individual Author: 
Gubits, Daniel
Shinn, Marybeth
Bell, Stephen
Wood, Michelle
Dastrup, Samuel
Solari, Claudia D.
Brown, Scott R.
Brown, Steven
Dunton, Lauren
Lin, Winston
McInnis, Debi
Rodriguez, Jason
Savidge, Galen
Spellman, Brooke E.

This report, titled Short-Term Impacts of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families, presents the short-term outcomes of the families enrolled in the Family Options Study, a multi-site random assignment experiment designed to study the impact of various housing and services interventions on homeless families. The report documents how families are faring approximately 20 months after random assignment to one of four interventions: community-based rapid re-housing (CBRR), project-based transitional housing (PBTH), permanent housing subsidy (SUB), and usual care (UC).

Interim report: Family Options Study

Individual Author: 
Gubits, Daniel
Spellman, Brooke
Dunton, Lauren
Brown, Scott
Wood, Michelle

This report presents results from the early implementation of the study of the Impact of Housing and Services Interventions for Homeless Families, referred to here as the Family Options Study. The Family Options Study is being sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to measure the relative impacts of four interventions commonly employed within local communities to help families experiencing homelessness.