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Contemporary work and family issues affecting marriage and cohabitation among low-income single mothers

Individual Author: 
Joshi, Pamela
Quane, James M.
Cherlin, Andrew J.
Reference type: 
Journal Article

In this paper, the authors advance and test an integrative model of the effects of employment status, nonstandard work schedules, male employment, and women's perceptions of economic instability on union formation among low-income single mothers. On the basis of the longitudinal data from 1,299 low-income mothers from the Three-City Welfare Study, results indicate that employment status alone is not significantly associated with whether women marry or cohabit.

Child care subsidies for TANF families: The nexus of systems and policies

Individual Author: 
Adams, Gina
Holcomb, Pamela. A.
Snyder, Kathleen
Koralek, Robin
Capizzano, Jeffrey
Reference type: 
Report

Over recent decades, policymakers have recognized that helping parents on welfare pay for child care is essential to help them move from welfare to work. As such, child care has consistently been an integral part of federal and state welfare reform efforts. It was a major focus of the 1996 welfare reform legislation, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), and of the cash assistance and welfare-to-work program it established—the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program.

Parents' perspectives on child care subsidies and moving from welfare to work

Individual Author: 
Snyder, Kathleen
Bernstein, Sara
Koralek, Robin
Reference type: 
Report

Child care subsidies are an important support service for families moving from welfare to work. The connections between child care and work, and the work oriented focus within the welfare system since welfare reform, have increased the need for links between the welfare-to-work and child care subsidy systems to ensure families receiving TANF and moving off TANF are connected to child care subsidies. This paper summarizes findings from the third phase of the study.

Tuning in to local labor markets: Findings from the sectoral employment impact study

Individual Author: 
Maguire, Shelia
Freely, Joshua
Clymer, Carol
Conway, Maureen
Schwartz, Deena
Reference type: 
Stakeholder Resource

Over the past two decades, an innovative approach to workforce development known as sectoral employment has emerged, resulting in the creation of industry-specific training programs that prepare unemployed and underskilled workers for skilled positions and connect them with employers seeking to fill such vacancies. In 2003, with funding from the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, P/PV launched the Sectoral Employment Impact Study to rigorously assess whether mature, nonprofit-led sector-focused programs could increase the earnings of disadvantaged workers and job seekers.

Child care subsidies and TANF: A synthesis of three studies on systems, policies, and parents

Individual Author: 
Holcomb, Pamela A.
Adams, Gina
Snyder, Kathleen
Koralek, Robin
Martinson, Karin
Bernstein, Sara
Capizzano, Jeffrey
Reference type: 
Report

Despite the critical role child care subsidies play in welfare-to-work efforts, little research has examined how sites have approached putting these services together for families. The Urban Institute engaged in a multiyear study to help fill the information gap about the complex interactions of these two systems on behalf of welfare families (box 2). This study occurred in three phases.