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Birmingham

Providing job search support for women over 50; Interim report on the implementation of AARP Foundation's Back To Work 50+: Women's Economic Stability Initiative

Individual Author: 
Betesh, Hannah
Cruz, Mayte
DeFever, Renatta
Henderson-Frakes, Jennifer
Kogan, Deborah
Paprocki, Anne

In 2014, the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) selected AARP Foundation to receive a three-year grant under the Social Innovation Fund (SIF) to operate and evaluate the Women’s Economic Stability Initiative (WESI) in multiple locations.

Farm-to-consumer retail outlet use, fruit and vegetable intake, and obesity status among WIC program participants in Alabama

Individual Author: 
Singleton, Chelsea R.
Baskin, Monica
Levitan, Emily B.
Sen, Bisakha
Affuso, Ermanno
Affuso, Olivia

Objectives: We studied whether use of farm-to-consumer (FTC) retail outlets (e.g., farmers market, farm/roadside stand) was associated with daily fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake or obesity status among women who participate in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) in Birmingham, AL.

Child care vouchers and unregulated family, friend, and neighbor care

Individual Author: 
Snyder, Kathleen
Bernstein, Sara
Adams, Gina

Many families receiving publicly-funded child care vouchers choose legally unregulated family friend and neighbors (FFN) to care for their children while they work. This paper focuses on the experiences of these providers with the voucher system in selected communities. This paper discusses findings from interviews with subsidy agency staff and administrators in five sites, and focus groups with unregulated providers in three of these sites, in 2004.

Child care subsidies for TANF families: The nexus of systems and policies

Individual Author: 
Adams, Gina
Holcomb, Pamela. A.
Snyder, Kathleen
Koralek, Robin
Capizzano, Jeffrey
Reference type: 
Report

Over recent decades, policymakers have recognized that helping parents on welfare pay for child care is essential to help them move from welfare to work. As such, child care has consistently been an integral part of federal and state welfare reform efforts. It was a major focus of the 1996 welfare reform legislation, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA), and of the cash assistance and welfare-to-work program it established—the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program.

Parents' perspectives on child care subsidies and moving from welfare to work

Individual Author: 
Snyder, Kathleen
Bernstein, Sara
Koralek, Robin
Reference type: 
Report

Child care subsidies are an important support service for families moving from welfare to work. The connections between child care and work, and the work oriented focus within the welfare system since welfare reform, have increased the need for links between the welfare-to-work and child care subsidy systems to ensure families receiving TANF and moving off TANF are connected to child care subsidies. This paper summarizes findings from the third phase of the study.

Child care subsidies and TANF: A synthesis of three studies on systems, policies, and parents

Individual Author: 
Holcomb, Pamela A.
Adams, Gina
Snyder, Kathleen
Koralek, Robin
Martinson, Karin
Bernstein, Sara
Capizzano, Jeffrey
Reference type: 
Report

Despite the critical role child care subsidies play in welfare-to-work efforts, little research has examined how sites have approached putting these services together for families. The Urban Institute engaged in a multiyear study to help fill the information gap about the complex interactions of these two systems on behalf of welfare families (box 2). This study occurred in three phases.