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Internet-based delivery of evidence-based health promotion programs among American Indian and Alaska Native youth: A case study

Individual Author: 
Markham, Christine M.
Rushing, Stephanie C.
Jessen, Cornelia
Gorman, Gwenda
Torres, Jennifer
Lambert, William E.
Prokhorov, Alexander V.
Miller, Leslie
Allums-Featherston, Kelly
Addy, Robert C.
Peskin, Melissa F.
Shegog, Ross

Background: American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth face multiple health challenges compared to other racial/ethnic groups, which could potentially be ameliorated by the dissemination of evidence-based adolescent health promotion programs. Previous studies have indicated that limited trained personnel, cultural barriers, and geographic isolation may hinder the reach and implementation of evidence-based health promotion programs among AI/AN youth.

Housing needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives in tribal areas: A report from the assessment of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian housing needs

Individual Author: 
Pindus, Nancy
Kingsley, G. Thomas
Biess, Jennifer
Levy, Diane
Simington, Jasmine
Hayes, Christopher

The centerpiece of the assessment of American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) housing conditions is the first ever national survey of American Indian and Alaska Native households in tribal areas. This survey sampled 1,340 AIAN households from 38 tribal areas and achieved a response rate of 60 percent. The survey offers information not available in existing census data sources, including estimates of electrical and heating problems, physical conditions problems, and the extent of "doubling up" among AIAN households in tribal areas.

Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) evaluation: Final report

Individual Author: 
Meit, Michael
Hafford, Carol
Fromknecht, Catharine
Knudson, Alana
Gilbert, Tess
Miesfeld, Noelle

This report presents key findings from the evaluation of the first round of the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program. These findings show that all five of the Tribal HPOG grantees established programs that led to healthcare training completion and employment. The report includes findings on programs' structures, processes, outcomes, and insights related to these findings. The evaluation team worked to conduct a culturally responsive evaluation by receiving input from partners, advisors, and grantees throughout the evaluation. (author abstract)

Study of coordination of tribal TANF and child welfare services: Final report

Individual Author: 
Ahonen, Pirkko
Buckless, Brandie
Keating, Kim
Keene, Kirsten
Morales, Julie
Park, Chi Connie

This report details 14 tribes and tribal organizations’ implementation of service coordination efforts across Tribal TANF and child welfare services. It describes the tribes and tribal organizations, explores their journeys to strengthen tribal families, identifies project facilitators and challenges, and shares lessons learned.

Higher education and workforce development in tribal communities and the role of tribal HPOG

Individual Author: 
Meit, Michael
Meyer, Katherine
Gilbert, Tess
Alfaro, Jennie
Levintow, Sara
Hafford, Carol
Knudson, Alana
Hernandez, Aleena
Carino, Theresa

This practice brief is part of a series being developed by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board (NIHB). The briefs will be used to disseminate important lessons learned and findings from the Evaluation of the Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) program, which is sponsored by the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF).

Easing the burden of caregiving: The impact of consumer direction on primary informal caregivers in Arkansas

Individual Author: 
Foster, Leslie
Brown, Randall
Phillips, Barbara
Carlson, Barbara Lepidus

Informal caregivers provide vital personal care and other supportive services to Medicaid beneficiaries who have physical dependencies, so promoting their well-being is an important policy objective. Caregiver well-being could be greatly affected by the amount, types, and quality of paid supportive services that beneficiaries receive in addition to informal help. This study compares the experiences of informal caregivers under two models of paid supportive services that were tested in the Arkansas Cash and Counseling demonstration.

Cook Inlet Tribal Council Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) program: Overview and preliminary outcomes

Individual Author: 
Meit, Michael

This brief provides an overview of the Cook Inlet Tribal Council (CITC) Tribal HPOG program, key findings to date, and stories from students who have benefitted from the program. Findings focus on program structures, program processes, and program outcomes, and is based on qualitative data from interviews with administrative and program implementation staff, focus groups with the CITC students, and phone interviews with program completers and non-completers, as well as administrative data.

Supporting low-skilled adults in college and career pathways: A story of supports and partnerships

Individual Author: 
Anderson, Theresa
McDonnell, Rachel Pleasants
Soricone, Lisa

This presentation describes Accelerating Opportunity (AO), a multi-state career pathways initiative designed to provide a more streamlined path for adults with low basic skills to move from integrated adult basic education and skills attainment to stackable credentials with labor market value.  The presentation includes some evaluation findings as well as discussion of partnerships the involved colleges have leveraged.

This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

Coordination of Tribal TANF and child welfare services: Early implementation

Individual Author: 
Ahonen, Pirkko
Keating, Kim
Morales, Julie
Vu, Connie
Hafford, Carol
Diaconis, Athena

This report describes the first year of activities of the 14 tribes and tribal organizations who in 2011 received demonstration grants from the Office of Family Assistance (OFA) for Coordination of Tribal TANF and Child Welfare Services to Tribal Families at Risk of Child Abuse or Neglect.  The overarching goal of the Study of Coordination of Tribal TANF and Child Welfare Services is to document the way in which the tribal grantees are creating and adapting culturally relevant and appropriate approaches, systems, and programs to increase coordination and enhance service delivery to address

Tribal Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) program evaluation: Interim report

Individual Author: 
Meit, Michael
Hafford, Carol
Meyer, Katherine
Knudson, Alana
Levintow, Sara
Gilbert, Tess
Langerman, Heather
Alfaro, Jennie

This Interim Report provides an overview of the tribal HPOG grantees’ progress over the first two years of the program with initial evaluation findings organized around program structure, program processes, and education and employment outcomes. The report also summarizes the evaluation questions and methodology. The report was written by the Tribal HPOG evaluation team, comprised of NORC at the University of Chicago, Red Star Innovations and the National Indian Health Board. (author abstract)