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Six-month follow-up changes for TANF-eligible clients involved in Kentucky's Targeted Assessment Program

Date Added to Library: 
Tuesday, April 22, 2014 - 12:43
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 
10.1080/01488376.2011.651412
Priority: 
normal
Individual Author: 
Leukefeld, Carl
Carlton, Erik L.
Staton-Tindall, Michele
Delaney, Melissa
Reference Type: 
Research Methodology: 
Publisher: 
Published Date: 
02/14/2012
Published Date (Text): 
02/14/2012
Publication: 
Journal of Social Service Research
Volume: 
38
Issue Number: 
3
Year: 
2012
Language(s): 
Abstract: 

Welfare reform has been successful in helping clients achieve self-sufficiency. However, some individuals experience problems associated with basic needs, physical health, mental health, substance abuse, and intimate partner violence (IPV) that can impede transitioning from welfare to work and/or interfere with parental responsibilities. The Targeted Assessment Program (TAP) was created more than a decade ago to identify and address these problems and help clients move off the welfare rolls in Kentucky. Self-reported interview data were used to examine changes and effect sizes between baseline assessment and 6-month follow-up from a sample of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families-eligible clients participating in Kentucky's TAP. Using McNemar's test for correlated proportions, paired-sample t-tests, and measures of effect size, significant changes with varied effect sizes were found for selected basic needs, as well as physical health, mental health, substance use, and IPV barriers. Findings suggest that social service practitioners could incorporate strengths-based case management and motivational interviewing into their practice. Further research is suggested utilizing longitudinal and controlled studies on evidence-based practice that address pretreatment and assessment strategies involving case management and motivational interviewing. (author abstract)

Geographic Focus: 
Page Count: 
17
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