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Serving the hardest to employ: Evidence from evaluations of subsidized employment programs

Date Added to Library: 
Wednesday, October 10, 2018 - 18:04
Priority: 
high
Individual Author: 
Carter, Clarence H.
Collins, Grant
Holzer, Harry
Bloom, Dan
Zielewski, Erica
Redcross, Cindy
Reference Type: 
Research Methodology: 
Place Published: 
Washington, D.C.
Published Date: 
05/31/2018
Published Date (Date): 
Thursday, May 31, 2018
Year: 
2018
Language(s): 
Abstract: 

This video and its accompanying presentation slides are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). This plenary discussed evidence from two large-scale evaluations of subsidized employment programs focusing on a range of hard-to-serve clients, including noncustodial parents, re-entering populations, low-income adults, and other populations. The discussion of these findings, placed into context with prior evidence from previous research, served as a platform to discuss how to move hard-to-employ individuals, like those who were formerly incarcerated or noncustodial parents, into employment and economic self-sufficiency. Erica Zielewski (Office of Management and Budget) moderated this session. Clarence H. Carter (Administration for Children and Families), Harry Holzer (Georgetown University), and Grant Collins (Fedcap) served as discussants. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

Geographic Focus: 
Page Count: 
20
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