Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Carnevale, Anthony P.; Cheah, Ban
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    In the past, a college degree all but assured job seekers employment and high earnings, but today, what you make depends on what you take. In Hard Times 2013, we show differences in unemployment and earnings based on major for BA and graduate degree holders. We show that STEM — Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics — majors typically offer the best opportunities for employment and earnings, while unemployment is higher for graduates with non-technical degrees.

    Here are some of our major findings:

    1. Even as the housing bubble seems to be dissipating, unemployment rates for recent architecture graduates have remained high (12.8%). Graduate degrees and work experience did not shield these graduates from a sector-specific shock; graduates with experience in the field have the same jobless rates as the economy overall (9.3%).

    2. Unemployment is generally higher for non-technical majors, such as the arts (9.8%) or law and public policy (9.2%).

    3. People who make technology are still better off than people who use technology. Unemployment rates...

    In the past, a college degree all but assured job seekers employment and high earnings, but today, what you make depends on what you take. In Hard Times 2013, we show differences in unemployment and earnings based on major for BA and graduate degree holders. We show that STEM — Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics — majors typically offer the best opportunities for employment and earnings, while unemployment is higher for graduates with non-technical degrees.

    Here are some of our major findings:

    1. Even as the housing bubble seems to be dissipating, unemployment rates for recent architecture graduates have remained high (12.8%). Graduate degrees and work experience did not shield these graduates from a sector-specific shock; graduates with experience in the field have the same jobless rates as the economy overall (9.3%).

    2. Unemployment is generally higher for non-technical majors, such as the arts (9.8%) or law and public policy (9.2%).

    3. People who make technology are still better off than people who use technology. Unemployment rates for recent graduates in information systems, concentrated in clerical functions, is high (14.7%) compared with mathematics (5.9%) and computer science (8.7%).

    4. Unemployment rates are relatively low for recent graduates in education (5.0%), engineering (7.0%), health and the sciences (4.8%) because they are tied to stable or growing industry sectors and occupations.

    5. Graduates in psychology and social work also have relatively low rates (8.8%) because almost half of them work in healthcare or education sectors.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rosenbaum, Sara
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    The article discusses the state of Medicaid in the wake of the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), with particular focus on the prospects for further healthcare reform given the political landscapes surrounding the program. It states that Medicaid was largely transformed by the ACA, but needs further reform to be part of a comprehensive national plan to provide universal health insurance coverage. It adds that the potential decline of Medicaid will be a strong political determination than a program driven mainly by health policy. (author abstract)

    The article discusses the state of Medicaid in the wake of the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), with particular focus on the prospects for further healthcare reform given the political landscapes surrounding the program. It states that Medicaid was largely transformed by the ACA, but needs further reform to be part of a comprehensive national plan to provide universal health insurance coverage. It adds that the potential decline of Medicaid will be a strong political determination than a program driven mainly by health policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Burke, Mike; Sims, Kate; Anderson, Signe; FirtzSimons, Crystal; Hewins, Jessie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    When the school year ends, millions of low-income children lose access to the school breakfasts and lunches they rely on during the school year. The federal Summer Nutrition Programs—the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP)—are designed to replace the regular school year programs, providing low-income children access to the nutritious meals they need to keep hunger at bay and remain healthy throughout the summer. The meals provided through the Summer Nutrition Programs also play an important role in drawing children into educational, enrichment, and recreational programming that keep them learning, engaged, active, safe, and moving during school vacation. (author abstract)

    When the school year ends, millions of low-income children lose access to the school breakfasts and lunches they rely on during the school year. The federal Summer Nutrition Programs—the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) and the National School Lunch Program (NSLP)—are designed to replace the regular school year programs, providing low-income children access to the nutritious meals they need to keep hunger at bay and remain healthy throughout the summer. The meals provided through the Summer Nutrition Programs also play an important role in drawing children into educational, enrichment, and recreational programming that keep them learning, engaged, active, safe, and moving during school vacation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wauchope, Barbara; Jaffee, Elenor; Lyons, Kristen; Lutz, Aimee Delaney
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    The information in this New Hampshire Kids Count Cities Data Book is primarily a story about children living in these large communities. However; to ensure we describe children from across the state, we include several smaller, more rural towns as well.

    The NH Kids Count Cities Data Book expands on the 2010/2011 New Hampshire Kids Count Data Book which reported state and county level data. This book focuses on fourteen cities and towns in our state reporting on 24 indicators of child well-being. Together these two New Hampshire publications provide a nuanced perspective of Granite State children and young adults, portraying areas of accomplishment as well as areas of need among the children and families of our state.(author abstract)

    The information in this New Hampshire Kids Count Cities Data Book is primarily a story about children living in these large communities. However; to ensure we describe children from across the state, we include several smaller, more rural towns as well.

    The NH Kids Count Cities Data Book expands on the 2010/2011 New Hampshire Kids Count Data Book which reported state and county level data. This book focuses on fourteen cities and towns in our state reporting on 24 indicators of child well-being. Together these two New Hampshire publications provide a nuanced perspective of Granite State children and young adults, portraying areas of accomplishment as well as areas of need among the children and families of our state.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Carlson, Deven; Haveman, Robert; Kaplan, Tom; Wolfe, Barbara
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    The federal Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) Program provides eligible low-income families with an income-conditioned voucher that pays for a portion of rental costs in privately owned, affordable housing units. This paper extends prior research on the effectiveness of rental support programs in several ways. The analysis employs a unique longitudinal dataset created by combining administrative records maintained by the State of Wisconsin with census block group data. We use a propensity score matching approach coupled with difference-in-differences regression analysis to estimate the effect of housing voucher receipt on the employment and earnings of voucher recipients; we track these effects for five years following voucher receipt. Our results indicate that voucher receipt has a generally positive effect on employment, but a negative impact on earnings. The negative earnings effect is largest in the years following initial receipt of the rental voucher, and dissipates over time. We find that the pattern of recipient labor market responses to voucher receipt differs...

    The federal Housing Choice Voucher (Section 8) Program provides eligible low-income families with an income-conditioned voucher that pays for a portion of rental costs in privately owned, affordable housing units. This paper extends prior research on the effectiveness of rental support programs in several ways. The analysis employs a unique longitudinal dataset created by combining administrative records maintained by the State of Wisconsin with census block group data. We use a propensity score matching approach coupled with difference-in-differences regression analysis to estimate the effect of housing voucher receipt on the employment and earnings of voucher recipients; we track these effects for five years following voucher receipt. Our results indicate that voucher receipt has a generally positive effect on employment, but a negative impact on earnings. The negative earnings effect is largest in the years following initial receipt of the rental voucher, and dissipates over time. We find that the pattern of recipient labor market responses to voucher receipt differs substantially among demographic subgroups. In addition to our overall results, we present sensitivity results involving alternative estimation methods, as well as distinctions between those who receive transitory voucher support and those who are long-term recipients. (author abstract)

    A journal article based on this working paper was published in 2012.

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1935 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations