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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Wagle, Udaya R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2009

    Shifting focus from income to capability signifies an important milestone toward accurately measuring poverty and deprivation. This paper operationalizes capability deprivation in the United States and compares measurement outcomes among various capability approaches and between capability and income spaces. Of the three capability approaches examined, the factor score absolute approach suggests a greater extent of deprivation and more comprehensive demographic profiles of the deprived. Additionally, I find that using the capability space may further attenuate the extent of deprivation over that using the income space and alter somewhat the stereotypical profiles of the poor and deprived. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a working paper that was published by the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan.

    Shifting focus from income to capability signifies an important milestone toward accurately measuring poverty and deprivation. This paper operationalizes capability deprivation in the United States and compares measurement outcomes among various capability approaches and between capability and income spaces. Of the three capability approaches examined, the factor score absolute approach suggests a greater extent of deprivation and more comprehensive demographic profiles of the deprived. Additionally, I find that using the capability space may further attenuate the extent of deprivation over that using the income space and alter somewhat the stereotypical profiles of the poor and deprived. (author abstract)

    This article is based on a working paper that was published by the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan.

  • Individual Author: Gennetian, Lisa A.; Rodrigues, Christopher; Hill, Heather D.; Morris, Pamela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Recent estimates suggest that differences in the amount of income instability (the amount of fluctuation in income, measured monthly) between the highest- and lowest-income households with children has increased nearly five-fold from 1984 to 2010, with the lowest-income households becoming less income stable. In this research brief, we take a close look at poverty and income instability among Hispanic children and compare their experiences with those of non-Hispanic children. This brief focuses on the following questions: Do experiences of income instability differ for Hispanic versus non-Hispanic children overall? Do these experiences differ for lower-income as compared to higher-income Hispanic and non-Hispanic children? Does income instability differ by Hispanic children’s select household and demographic characteristics? (author abstract)

    Recent estimates suggest that differences in the amount of income instability (the amount of fluctuation in income, measured monthly) between the highest- and lowest-income households with children has increased nearly five-fold from 1984 to 2010, with the lowest-income households becoming less income stable. In this research brief, we take a close look at poverty and income instability among Hispanic children and compare their experiences with those of non-Hispanic children. This brief focuses on the following questions: Do experiences of income instability differ for Hispanic versus non-Hispanic children overall? Do these experiences differ for lower-income as compared to higher-income Hispanic and non-Hispanic children? Does income instability differ by Hispanic children’s select household and demographic characteristics? (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gennetian, Lisa A.; Rodrigues, Christopher; Hill, Heather D.; Morris, Pamela A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This brief explores income instability among Hispanic children in the context of dramatic shifts in the economic and employment circumstances of U.S. households during the Great Recession. This question is explored as a companion to the brief entitled “Income Instability in the Lives of Hispanic Children,” using data from periods that roughly correspond to the pre- and near post-recession periods to examine income stability experienced by Hispanic children over time. Specifically, we compare Hispanic children’s experiences of unstable income over the 2004 to 2006 period with experiences of unstable income from 2008 to 2011, that represents the period during and just following the Great Recession. (author abstract)

    This brief explores income instability among Hispanic children in the context of dramatic shifts in the economic and employment circumstances of U.S. households during the Great Recession. This question is explored as a companion to the brief entitled “Income Instability in the Lives of Hispanic Children,” using data from periods that roughly correspond to the pre- and near post-recession periods to examine income stability experienced by Hispanic children over time. Specifically, we compare Hispanic children’s experiences of unstable income over the 2004 to 2006 period with experiences of unstable income from 2008 to 2011, that represents the period during and just following the Great Recession. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Alvira-Hammond, Marta; Gennetian, Lisa A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Public assistance programs aim to provide support to low-income children and families, and help them attain or regain economic self-sufficiency. Despite high levels of poverty, Hispanics/Latinos are less likely than members of other racial/ethnic groups to participate in some public assistance programs. Although the reasons for this are not fully understood, we do know that Hispanic families, and particularly immigrant families, face a number of unique obstacles to accessing public assistance. Using national data, this brief describes reasons low- to middle-income Hispanic parents reported for not applying for public assistance or, for those already receiving assistance, not applying for additional assistance. (author abstract)

    Public assistance programs aim to provide support to low-income children and families, and help them attain or regain economic self-sufficiency. Despite high levels of poverty, Hispanics/Latinos are less likely than members of other racial/ethnic groups to participate in some public assistance programs. Although the reasons for this are not fully understood, we do know that Hispanic families, and particularly immigrant families, face a number of unique obstacles to accessing public assistance. Using national data, this brief describes reasons low- to middle-income Hispanic parents reported for not applying for public assistance or, for those already receiving assistance, not applying for additional assistance. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fisher, Monica
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2004

    Research shows people are more likely to be poor in rural versus urban America. Does this phenomenon partly reflect that people who choose rural residence have unmeasured attributes related to human impoverishment? To address this question, two models are estimated using Panel Study of Income Dynamics data. A single equation Probit model of individual poverty replicates the well-documented finding of higher poverty risk in rural places. However, an instrumental variables approach, accounting for correlation between rural residence and the poverty equation error term, finds no measured effect of rural location on poverty. Results suggest failure to correct for endogeneity or omitted variable bias may overestimate the "rural effect." (author abstract)

    This article is based on a working paper published by the Rural Poverty Research Center.

    Research shows people are more likely to be poor in rural versus urban America. Does this phenomenon partly reflect that people who choose rural residence have unmeasured attributes related to human impoverishment? To address this question, two models are estimated using Panel Study of Income Dynamics data. A single equation Probit model of individual poverty replicates the well-documented finding of higher poverty risk in rural places. However, an instrumental variables approach, accounting for correlation between rural residence and the poverty equation error term, finds no measured effect of rural location on poverty. Results suggest failure to correct for endogeneity or omitted variable bias may overestimate the "rural effect." (author abstract)

    This article is based on a working paper published by the Rural Poverty Research Center.

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