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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Nunez, Stephen; Verma, Nandita; Yang, Edith
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    In 2007, New York City’s Center for Economic Opportunity launched Opportunity NYC–Work Rewards to test three ways of increasing employment and earnings for families who receive rental assistance under the federal Housing Choice Vouchers Program. Two of the interventions include the Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) program, the main federal effort for increasing employment and earnings and reducing reliance on government subsidies. FSS, which is administered by local public housing authorities, offers participants case management to connect them to employment and social services, as well as a vehicle for building their assets through an escrow savings account. As a family’s income increases, so does its share of the rent. Families in FSS pay that increased rent to the landlord, and the housing authority credits the family’s escrow account based on the increases in earned income during the term of the FSS contract. Escrow accruals are paid to participants when they complete the program, which could take up to five years.

    The Work Rewards demonstration is evaluating the...

    In 2007, New York City’s Center for Economic Opportunity launched Opportunity NYC–Work Rewards to test three ways of increasing employment and earnings for families who receive rental assistance under the federal Housing Choice Vouchers Program. Two of the interventions include the Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) program, the main federal effort for increasing employment and earnings and reducing reliance on government subsidies. FSS, which is administered by local public housing authorities, offers participants case management to connect them to employment and social services, as well as a vehicle for building their assets through an escrow savings account. As a family’s income increases, so does its share of the rent. Families in FSS pay that increased rent to the landlord, and the housing authority credits the family’s escrow account based on the increases in earned income during the term of the FSS contract. Escrow accruals are paid to participants when they complete the program, which could take up to five years.

    The Work Rewards demonstration is evaluating the effectiveness of the FSS program alone (“FSS-only”) as well as an enhanced version of the program that offered all the components of FSS plus special cash work incentives (“FSS+incentives”) conditioned on reaching specific education- and employment-related benchmarks. Work Rewards also tests an offer of those same incentives alone, without FSS, to determine whether this administratively simpler and potentially less costly approach could be effective. The demonstration used an experimental design, with program and control groups for the different studies. This report presents results over four years. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Cohen, Jeff; Hanleybrown, Fay; Pandit, Mukta; Tallant, Kate
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    This report explores the challenges low-income young adults face in accessing and using financial aid and the related trends contributing to inequality in post-secondary education today, as well as potential approaches funders can undertake to redesign financial aid to help students overcome these barriers. (author abstract)

    This report explores the challenges low-income young adults face in accessing and using financial aid and the related trends contributing to inequality in post-secondary education today, as well as potential approaches funders can undertake to redesign financial aid to help students overcome these barriers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Matthews, Hannah
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2009

    As the economic recovery package moves through Congress, it is critical that it include a $3 billion increase in the federal child care assistance program, the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG). Child care is a program that works. Research shows that child care assistance makes a significant difference in the economic health and security of families. It helps families sustain their participation in the workforce, reduce instability in care arrangements that can impact work, and move out of poverty. (author abstract)

    As the economic recovery package moves through Congress, it is critical that it include a $3 billion increase in the federal child care assistance program, the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG). Child care is a program that works. Research shows that child care assistance makes a significant difference in the economic health and security of families. It helps families sustain their participation in the workforce, reduce instability in care arrangements that can impact work, and move out of poverty. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gomby, Deanna S.; Krantzler, Nora; Larner, Mary B.; Stevenson, Carol S.; Terman, Donna L.; Behrman, Richard E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This Analysis begins with a brief description of current funding for child care services and continues with a review of the problems in the child care system. Main proposals for reform of child care financing are described. The Analysis next estimates costs for these plans and examines some of the ways that necessary additional dollars could be raised. Principles to guide any financing reform are suggested, and the Analysis concludes with a discussion of the prospects for change. (author introduction)

    This Analysis begins with a brief description of current funding for child care services and continues with a review of the problems in the child care system. Main proposals for reform of child care financing are described. The Analysis next estimates costs for these plans and examines some of the ways that necessary additional dollars could be raised. Principles to guide any financing reform are suggested, and the Analysis concludes with a discussion of the prospects for change. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Walker, James R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    This article proposes two financing plans to address what the author identifies as the two primary concerns in the child care field: (1) a child allowance for poor and near-poor households to address the child care problems of low-income families, and (2) a program of voluntary parental leave, available to all parents at child birth or adoption, to ensure the adequacy of infant care.

    The child allowance plan would cover the first three children in families up to 175% of the poverty level (more than 22 million children) at an annual cost of $45 billion. The author suggests that the allowance could be financed by redirecting funds from existing income support (for example, Aid to Families with Dependent Children), tax credit, and tax deduction programs.

    Financing the parental leave program would require new revenues, generated by an employee-paid increase in payroll tax totaling 3.5%. Each employee's contributions would create a parental leave account (PLA). Families could use the funds in these accounts to cover the cost of a one-year leave from work after the birth...

    This article proposes two financing plans to address what the author identifies as the two primary concerns in the child care field: (1) a child allowance for poor and near-poor households to address the child care problems of low-income families, and (2) a program of voluntary parental leave, available to all parents at child birth or adoption, to ensure the adequacy of infant care.

    The child allowance plan would cover the first three children in families up to 175% of the poverty level (more than 22 million children) at an annual cost of $45 billion. The author suggests that the allowance could be financed by redirecting funds from existing income support (for example, Aid to Families with Dependent Children), tax credit, and tax deduction programs.

    Financing the parental leave program would require new revenues, generated by an employee-paid increase in payroll tax totaling 3.5%. Each employee's contributions would create a parental leave account (PLA). Families could use the funds in these accounts to cover the cost of a one-year leave from work after the birth or adoption of a child. If families did not have enough dollars in their accounts to cover the cost of the leave, the federal government would extend a low-interest loan to them, which they would have to pay back. The amount individuals receive through Social Security would be adjusted upward or downward according to the balances in their parental leave accounts at retirement.

    The author suggests that both proposals would help parents balance work and family obligations and protect parental freedom of choice over the care and upbringing of their children. (author abstract)

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