Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Damron, Neil
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    "Brain Drain: A Child's Brain on Poverty," released in March 2015 and prepared by intern Neil Damron, explores the brain's basic anatomy and recent research findings suggesting that poverty affects the brain development of infants and young children and the potential lifelong effects of the changes. The sheet draws from a variety of sources, especially work by IRP affiliates and Professors Barbara Wolfe (Economics, Public Affairs, and Population Health Sciences), Seth Pollak (Psychology, Anthropology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Public Affairs), and Katherine Magnuson (Social Work), who provided guidance and content review. (Author abstract)

    "Brain Drain: A Child's Brain on Poverty," released in March 2015 and prepared by intern Neil Damron, explores the brain's basic anatomy and recent research findings suggesting that poverty affects the brain development of infants and young children and the potential lifelong effects of the changes. The sheet draws from a variety of sources, especially work by IRP affiliates and Professors Barbara Wolfe (Economics, Public Affairs, and Population Health Sciences), Seth Pollak (Psychology, Anthropology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Public Affairs), and Katherine Magnuson (Social Work), who provided guidance and content review. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Murray, D.W.; Rosanbalm, K.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Introduction

    Adult caregivers such as parents, teachers, coaches, and other mentors play a critical role in shaping and supporting self-regulation development from birth through young adulthood through an interactive process called “co-regulation.” (author introduction)

    Purpose

    This snapshot summarizes key concepts about self-regulation development and intervention for middle-school aged youth for practitioners and educators interested in promoting self-regulation for this age group. It is based on a series of four reports on Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress prepared for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). 

    Highlights

    Self-regulation skills developing in middle- school aged children:

    • Completing longer and more complex tasks
    • Self-monitoring
    • Planning, prioritization, and time management to achieve goals
    • Using strategies to manage stress
    • Using health-promoting strategies to calm down when distressed
    • Considering consequences...

    Introduction

    Adult caregivers such as parents, teachers, coaches, and other mentors play a critical role in shaping and supporting self-regulation development from birth through young adulthood through an interactive process called “co-regulation.” (author introduction)

    Purpose

    This snapshot summarizes key concepts about self-regulation development and intervention for middle-school aged youth for practitioners and educators interested in promoting self-regulation for this age group. It is based on a series of four reports on Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress prepared for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). 

    Highlights

    Self-regulation skills developing in middle- school aged children:

    • Completing longer and more complex tasks
    • Self-monitoring
    • Planning, prioritization, and time management to achieve goals
    • Using strategies to manage stress
    • Using health-promoting strategies to calm down when distressed
    • Considering consequences before acting
    • Making effective decisions “in the moment”
    • Solving more complex problems independently
    • Goals, behavior, and decision-making guided by empathy and concern for others

    Key considerations for promoting self-regulation in middle-school aged youth:

    • Encourage a positive school climate for all students
    • Deliver self-regulation skills training in at-risk schools
    • Train teachers and afterschool staff to teach, model, reinforce, and coach self-regulation skills
    • Identify ways to support school and program staff’s own self-regulation capacity
    • Provide parent education supports that address co-regulation (Author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Murray, D.W.; Rosanbalm, K.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Introduction

    Adult caregivers such as parents, teachers, coaches, and other mentors play a critical role in shaping and supporting self-regulation development from birth through young adulthood through an interactive process called “co-regulation.”

    Purpose

    This is one of six snapshots focused on different age groups based on a series of reports on Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress prepared for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). This snapshot summarized key concepts about self-regulation development and intervention for high-school aged youth. It is designed to be a helpful resource for practitioners and educators interested in promoting self-regulation for this high-school age group. Visit the Toxic Stress and Self-Regulation Reports page for more information.

    Highlights

    Self-regulation skills developing in high-school aged youth: 

    • Goal setting and commitment
    • Maintaining orientation toward the future
    • Planning and organizing time and tasks to achieve...

    Introduction

    Adult caregivers such as parents, teachers, coaches, and other mentors play a critical role in shaping and supporting self-regulation development from birth through young adulthood through an interactive process called “co-regulation.”

    Purpose

    This is one of six snapshots focused on different age groups based on a series of reports on Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress prepared for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). This snapshot summarized key concepts about self-regulation development and intervention for high-school aged youth. It is designed to be a helpful resource for practitioners and educators interested in promoting self-regulation for this high-school age group. Visit the Toxic Stress and Self-Regulation Reports page for more information.

    Highlights

    Self-regulation skills developing in high-school aged youth: 

    • Goal setting and commitment
    • Maintaining orientation toward the future
    • Planning and organizing time and tasks to achieve goals
    • Effective decision-making in the context of strong emotion and peer influence
    • Complex problem-solving considering consequences and others perspectives
    • Recognizing and accepting emotions
    • Tolerating distress
    • Using healthy coping strategies to manage stress
    • Using empathy and concern for others to guide goals and decisions

    Key considerations for promoting self-regulation in high-school aged youth:

    • Encourage a positive school climate for all students
    • Provide self-regulation skills training focused on emotion regulation in the context of relationships through existing youth development or mentoring programs
    • Train teachers and youth program staff including mentors to teach, model, reinforce, and coach self-regulation skills
    • Develop parent and teacher education supports that address co-regulation
    • Identify ways to support the self-regulation capacity of parents, school staff, and youth program staff including mentors (Author introduction)
  • Individual Author: Murray, D.W.; Rosanbalm, K.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Introduction

    Adult caregivers such as parents, teachers, coaches, and other mentors play a critical role in shaping and supporting self-regulation development from birth through young adulthood through an interactive process called “co-regulation.”

    Purpose

    This snapshot summarizes key concepts about self-regulation development and intervention for preschool-aged children for practitioners and educators interested in promoting self-regulation for this age group. It is based on a series of four reports on Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress prepared for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). Visit the Toxic Stress and Self-Regulation Reports page for more information.

    Highlights

    • Self-regulation skills developing in preschool-aged children:
    • Recognizing a broader range of feelings in self and others
    • Identifying solutions to simple problems
    • With support, using strategies like deep breaths and self-talk to calm down
    • Focusing attention for longer...

    Introduction

    Adult caregivers such as parents, teachers, coaches, and other mentors play a critical role in shaping and supporting self-regulation development from birth through young adulthood through an interactive process called “co-regulation.”

    Purpose

    This snapshot summarizes key concepts about self-regulation development and intervention for preschool-aged children for practitioners and educators interested in promoting self-regulation for this age group. It is based on a series of four reports on Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress prepared for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). Visit the Toxic Stress and Self-Regulation Reports page for more information.

    Highlights

    • Self-regulation skills developing in preschool-aged children:
    • Recognizing a broader range of feelings in self and others
    • Identifying solutions to simple problems
    • With support, using strategies like deep breaths and self-talk to calm down
    • Focusing attention for longer periods
    • Persisting on difficult talks for increased lengths of time
    • Perspective-taking and early empathy

    Key considerations for promoting self-regulation in preschool-aged children:

    • Deliver self-regulation skills instruction universally in preschool classrooms
    • Train preschool staff in co-regulation skills Identify ways to support school and program staff’s own self-regulation capacity
    • Share self-regulation information, ideas, and classroom approaches with parents/caregivers to support their co-regulation and promote consistency across environments (Author introduction)
  • Individual Author: Murray, D.W.; Rosanbalm, K.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Introduction

    Adult caregivers such as parents, teachers, coaches, and other mentors play a critical role in shaping and supporting self-regulation development from birth through young adulthood through an interactive process called “co-regulation.”

    Purpose

    This snapshot summarizes key concepts about self-regulation development and intervention for elementary-aged children for practitioners and educators interested in promoting self-regulation for this age group. It is based on a series of four reports on Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress prepared for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). Visit the Toxic Stress and Self-Regulation Reports page for more information.

    Highlights

    Self-regulation skills developing in elementary-aged children:

    • Use of self-talk to control behavior
    • Cognitive flexibility/problem-solving
    • Attentional control/sustained focus Increased delay of gratification
    • Managing emotion “in the moment”
    • Goals and behavior guided...

    Introduction

    Adult caregivers such as parents, teachers, coaches, and other mentors play a critical role in shaping and supporting self-regulation development from birth through young adulthood through an interactive process called “co-regulation.”

    Purpose

    This snapshot summarizes key concepts about self-regulation development and intervention for elementary-aged children for practitioners and educators interested in promoting self-regulation for this age group. It is based on a series of four reports on Self-Regulation and Toxic Stress prepared for the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). Visit the Toxic Stress and Self-Regulation Reports page for more information.

    Highlights

    Self-regulation skills developing in elementary-aged children:

    • Use of self-talk to control behavior
    • Cognitive flexibility/problem-solving
    • Attentional control/sustained focus Increased delay of gratification
    • Managing emotion “in the moment”
    • Goals and behavior guided by empathy and concern for others
    • Organization of behavior to achieve goals
    • Completion of larger and more complex tasks

    Key considerations for promoting self-regulation in elementary-aged children:

    • Encourage a positive school climate for all students
    • Deliver self-regulation skills training in at-risk schools
    • Train teachers and afterschool staff to teach, model, reinforce, and coach self-regulation skills Identify ways to support school and program staff’s own self-regulation capacity
    • Provide parent education supports that address co-regulation (Author introduction)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2015 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations