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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality; The Russell Sage Foundation
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2013

    Description: Recession Trends provides 16 up-to-date briefs by top scholars addressing recent trends in wealth, consumption, the labor market, housing, poverty, safety net systems, health, education, crime, attitudes, and a variety of other domains. The site also archives over a thousand time series and allows visitors to build their own graphs representing  key trends in 16 domain areas.

    Population: The data for Recession Trends come from dozens of high-quality data sets.  Full source and methodological information is provided on the site for each time series.

    Periodicity: The data are updated annually and, for some series, reach back a half-century or even longer.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    Description: Recession Trends provides 16 up-to-date briefs by top scholars addressing recent trends in wealth, consumption, the labor market, housing, poverty, safety net systems, health, education, crime, attitudes, and a variety of other domains. The site also archives over a thousand time series and allows visitors to build their own graphs representing  key trends in 16 domain areas.

    Population: The data for Recession Trends come from dozens of high-quality data sets.  Full source and methodological information is provided on the site for each time series.

    Periodicity: The data are updated annually and, for some series, reach back a half-century or even longer.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

  • Individual Author: Sawhill, Isabel V.; Haskins, Ron
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2009

    Americans believe economic opportunity is as fundamental a right as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. More concerned about a level playing field for all, they worry less about the growing income and wealth disparity in our country. Creating an Opportunity Society examines economic opportunity in the United States and explores how to create more of it, particularly for those on the bottom rungs of the economic ladder. Ron Haskins and Isabel Sawhill propose a concrete agenda for increasing opportunity that is cost effective, consistent with American values, and focuses on improving the lives of the young and the disadvantaged. They emphasize individual responsibility as an indispensable basis for successful policies and programs. The authors recommend a three-pronged approach to create more opportunity in America: " Increase education for children and youth at the preschool, K--12, and postsecondary levels " Encourage and support work among adults " Reduce the number of out-of-wedlock births while increasing the share of children reared by their married parents With...

    Americans believe economic opportunity is as fundamental a right as life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. More concerned about a level playing field for all, they worry less about the growing income and wealth disparity in our country. Creating an Opportunity Society examines economic opportunity in the United States and explores how to create more of it, particularly for those on the bottom rungs of the economic ladder. Ron Haskins and Isabel Sawhill propose a concrete agenda for increasing opportunity that is cost effective, consistent with American values, and focuses on improving the lives of the young and the disadvantaged. They emphasize individual responsibility as an indispensable basis for successful policies and programs. The authors recommend a three-pronged approach to create more opportunity in America: " Increase education for children and youth at the preschool, K--12, and postsecondary levels " Encourage and support work among adults " Reduce the number of out-of-wedlock births while increasing the share of children reared by their married parents With concern for the federal deficit in mind, Haskins and Sawhill argue for reallocating existing resources, especially from the affluent elderly to disadvantaged children and their families. The authors are optimistic that a judicious use of the nation's resources can level the playing field and produce more opportunity for all. Creating an Opportunity Society offers the most complete summary available of the facts and the factors that contribute to economic opportunity. It looks at the poor, the middle class, and the rich, providing deep background data on how each group has fared in recent decades. Unfortunately, only the rich have made substantial progress, making this book a timely guide forward for anyone interested in what we can do as a society to improve the prospects for our less-advantaged families and fellow citizens. (publisher abstract)

  • Individual Author: Isen, Adam; Stevenson, Betsey
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    This paper examines how marital and fertility patterns have changed along racial and educational lines for men and women. Historically, women with more education have been the least likely to marry and have children, but this marriage gap has eroded as the returns to marriage have changed. Marriage and remarriage rates have risen for women with a college degree relative to women with fewer years of education. However, the patterns of, and reasons for, marriage have changed. College educated women marry later, have fewer children, are less likely to view marriage as “financial security”, are happier in their marriages and with their family life, and are not only the least likely to divorce, but have had the biggest decrease in divorce since the 1970s compared to women without a college degree. In contrast, there have been fewer changes in marital patterns by education for men. (author abstract)

    This paper examines how marital and fertility patterns have changed along racial and educational lines for men and women. Historically, women with more education have been the least likely to marry and have children, but this marriage gap has eroded as the returns to marriage have changed. Marriage and remarriage rates have risen for women with a college degree relative to women with fewer years of education. However, the patterns of, and reasons for, marriage have changed. College educated women marry later, have fewer children, are less likely to view marriage as “financial security”, are happier in their marriages and with their family life, and are not only the least likely to divorce, but have had the biggest decrease in divorce since the 1970s compared to women without a college degree. In contrast, there have been fewer changes in marital patterns by education for men. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rahal, Ramy T.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    This study uses a prospective design, only including children whose parents were married at the time of the child's birth and who remained married at the child's outset of high school. Using data from the 1979 version of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) and the NLSY79 Child and Young Adult Supplement, I ran a series of probit models to estimate the effects of parental divorce during a child's high school years on the likelihood of that child graduating from high school by the age of 20. The age limit of 20, rather than within four years, diminishes the problem of right-censorship. (author abstract).

    This study uses a prospective design, only including children whose parents were married at the time of the child's birth and who remained married at the child's outset of high school. Using data from the 1979 version of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY79) and the NLSY79 Child and Young Adult Supplement, I ran a series of probit models to estimate the effects of parental divorce during a child's high school years on the likelihood of that child graduating from high school by the age of 20. The age limit of 20, rather than within four years, diminishes the problem of right-censorship. (author abstract).

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Family Assistance
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of low-income working families continues to increase, from 10.2 million in 2010 up to 10.4 million in 2011 (Roberts, Povich, & Mathers, 2012-2013). Children are particularly hard hit, with more than 32 million children living in poverty today—many in homes where at least one parent is working (Addy, Engelhardt, & Skinner, 2013). While the United States economy continues to show signs of recovery from the Great Recession, the economic outlook for many low-income, underemployed families is bleak. The earnings gap between those who are able to obtain education leading to higher level skills and those who cannot continues to grow (The Anne E. Casey Foundation, 2005; Roberts, Povich, & Mathers, 2012-2013).

    To address these issues, many human services programs, including the Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood (HMRF) program, seek to help individuals build their capacity to obtain and keep employment. Through a set of activities known as economic stability and workforce development (ESWD), HMRF grantees work to...

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the number of low-income working families continues to increase, from 10.2 million in 2010 up to 10.4 million in 2011 (Roberts, Povich, & Mathers, 2012-2013). Children are particularly hard hit, with more than 32 million children living in poverty today—many in homes where at least one parent is working (Addy, Engelhardt, & Skinner, 2013). While the United States economy continues to show signs of recovery from the Great Recession, the economic outlook for many low-income, underemployed families is bleak. The earnings gap between those who are able to obtain education leading to higher level skills and those who cannot continues to grow (The Anne E. Casey Foundation, 2005; Roberts, Povich, & Mathers, 2012-2013).

    To address these issues, many human services programs, including the Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood (HMRF) program, seek to help individuals build their capacity to obtain and keep employment. Through a set of activities known as economic stability and workforce development (ESWD), HMRF grantees work to improve the economic well-being of children and families through employment and career advancement.

    To support organizations in implementing effective ESWD services, OFA has developed a conceptual framework for guiding HMRF programs in establishing and strengthening systems to support participants in achieving economic stability. The framework is designed to help HMRF grantees more effectively organize their services for maximum impact and to strengthen partnerships with other community organizations that seek to help low-income families in find, retain, and advance in employment. This framework, called A Community-Based HMRF Workforce Strategy, links key concepts of economic stability with specific strategies that programs and participants can employ.

    Based on the conceptual workforce strategy, this toolkit provides suggestions and resources regarding key case management and service delivery components. Together, those components can meaningfully help low-income program participants move along a pathway toward job and financial security. The toolkit comprises five modules that align with the key component of the ESWD framework—from intake and assessment to work retention and career advancement. (author introduction)

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