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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: National Skills Coalition
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Comprehensive immigration reform has tremendous economic potential for individuals and the nation as a whole and will result in far-reaching changes to the labor market. In order to create economic growth and opportunity, though, the legislation must include an equally ambitious, integrated investment in skills—far greater than what is currently proposed. There will likely be a significant increase in demand for adult education by currently undocumented immigrants, not to mention the already existing unmet need for English language, adult literacy, and skills training for U.S. citizens. The proposal currently under consideration is insufficient to meet these growing programmatic demands. With support from the Ford Foundation, NSC has worked with local and national partners with expertise in workforce development, adult education and immigrant integration, to develop this proposal for a skills strategy that would dramatically increase the amount and impact of resources available for skills training – for immigrant and native-born workers – without increasing the cost of...

    Comprehensive immigration reform has tremendous economic potential for individuals and the nation as a whole and will result in far-reaching changes to the labor market. In order to create economic growth and opportunity, though, the legislation must include an equally ambitious, integrated investment in skills—far greater than what is currently proposed. There will likely be a significant increase in demand for adult education by currently undocumented immigrants, not to mention the already existing unmet need for English language, adult literacy, and skills training for U.S. citizens. The proposal currently under consideration is insufficient to meet these growing programmatic demands. With support from the Ford Foundation, NSC has worked with local and national partners with expertise in workforce development, adult education and immigrant integration, to develop this proposal for a skills strategy that would dramatically increase the amount and impact of resources available for skills training – for immigrant and native-born workers – without increasing the cost of comprehensive immigration reform. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Solomon-Fears, Carmen; Falk, Gene; Fernandes-Alcantara, Adrienne L.
    Year: 2013

    This report displays and discusses some of the data related to the poverty of children and their living arrangements and data on male employment and earnings, educational attainment, and incarceration. It then provides information on federal programs that could play a greater role in addressing poverty of children through the fathers of these children (nearly all noncustodial parents are fathers). These programs provide economic assistance, family support, and job training and employment to eligible participants. The report also examines federal programs that have the purposes of preventing teen pregnancy and helping disadvantaged youth obtain the skills and support they need to make the transition to adulthood. The underlying premise of these programs generally is that the aid or services received from these programs by low-income noncustodial fathers can help them in meeting their financial commitments to their children (or future children) and providing emotional support to their children. The report concludes by presenting several public policy approaches proposed by the...

    This report displays and discusses some of the data related to the poverty of children and their living arrangements and data on male employment and earnings, educational attainment, and incarceration. It then provides information on federal programs that could play a greater role in addressing poverty of children through the fathers of these children (nearly all noncustodial parents are fathers). These programs provide economic assistance, family support, and job training and employment to eligible participants. The report also examines federal programs that have the purposes of preventing teen pregnancy and helping disadvantaged youth obtain the skills and support they need to make the transition to adulthood. The underlying premise of these programs generally is that the aid or services received from these programs by low-income noncustodial fathers can help them in meeting their financial commitments to their children (or future children) and providing emotional support to their children. The report concludes by presenting several public policy approaches proposed by the policy community that might improve the lives of low-income noncustodial fathers and their children. For example, social policy could play a role by expanding economic assistance programs to noncustodial fathers, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP); and implementing strategies to prevent the build-up of unpaid child support through early intervention. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Haskins, Ron; Rouse, Cecilia E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    If more children from low-income families graduated from college, income inequality would fall and economic opportunity would increase. A major barrier to a college education for students from low-income families is that they are poorly prepared to do college work. Since the War on Poverty of the 1960s, the federal government has funded several programs to help prepare disadvantaged students to succeed in college. Evaluations show that these programs are at best only modestly successful. We propose to consolidate these programs into a single grant program, require that funded programs be backed by rigorous evidence, and give the Department of Education the authority and funding to plan a coordinated set of research and demonstration programs to develop and rigorously test several approaches to college preparation. (author abstract)

    If more children from low-income families graduated from college, income inequality would fall and economic opportunity would increase. A major barrier to a college education for students from low-income families is that they are poorly prepared to do college work. Since the War on Poverty of the 1960s, the federal government has funded several programs to help prepare disadvantaged students to succeed in college. Evaluations show that these programs are at best only modestly successful. We propose to consolidate these programs into a single grant program, require that funded programs be backed by rigorous evidence, and give the Department of Education the authority and funding to plan a coordinated set of research and demonstration programs to develop and rigorously test several approaches to college preparation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Foster, Marcie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The Adult Education and Economic Growth Act (AEEGA) was introduced in the House of Representatives in June 2011 by Rep. Ruben Hinojosa (TX-15) and in February 2012 in the Senate by Sen. Jim Webb (VA). The Act (H.R. 2226 and S. 2117) would amend the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) to encourage the use and availability of career pathways for low-skilled adults, strengthen the focus of adult education on postsecondary and career success, increase the number of adult education students receiving marketable postsecondary credentials, and modernize the adult education system to meet the needs of 21st century jobs. Although AEEGA could substantially improve WIA--particularly the Title II provisions that govern adult education--it could be strengthened by incorporating stronger provisions that promote better alignment between WIA Titles I and II, including a shared system of accountability. By 2018, economists predict that 63 percent of jobs will require a postsecondary education, yet, today, only 55 percent of adults have at least some college education. A growing wage gap between higher...

    The Adult Education and Economic Growth Act (AEEGA) was introduced in the House of Representatives in June 2011 by Rep. Ruben Hinojosa (TX-15) and in February 2012 in the Senate by Sen. Jim Webb (VA). The Act (H.R. 2226 and S. 2117) would amend the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) to encourage the use and availability of career pathways for low-skilled adults, strengthen the focus of adult education on postsecondary and career success, increase the number of adult education students receiving marketable postsecondary credentials, and modernize the adult education system to meet the needs of 21st century jobs. Although AEEGA could substantially improve WIA--particularly the Title II provisions that govern adult education--it could be strengthened by incorporating stronger provisions that promote better alignment between WIA Titles I and II, including a shared system of accountability. By 2018, economists predict that 63 percent of jobs will require a postsecondary education, yet, today, only 55 percent of adults have at least some college education. A growing wage gap between higher- and lower-educated workers also increases the urgency of helping workers access further education and training. Lower-educated workers are more likely to earn lower wages, be unemployed, have children who do not go to college, and have health problems that impact their longevity and economic well-being. AEEGA addresses these challenges by raising expectations for the adult education system from one that simply helps adults gain basic literacy or a secondary school diploma to one that helps adults get on a sustainable path to postsecondary and career success. It shifts the goals and purpose of adult education from a focus on receipt of a high school diploma or GED to a focus on postsecondary access and success. To fulfill this new purpose, AEEGA focuses on improvements in four main areas: (1) strengthening the focus on postsecondary "transition and success" for students at every basic skill level; (2) encouraging the use and availability of career pathways for low-skilled adults; (3) improving the likelihood that adult education students and individuals in workforce training will earn credentials as a result of their program; and (4) modernizing adult education delivery systems to align with 21st century technology and skill demands. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Helmcamp, Leslie; Garza, Roxanne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Texas can do better to strengthen the adult basic education and literacy system to move more Texans into a family-supporting career. To make system-wide changes to the way adult basic education is delivered and improve outcomes for adult learners in Texas, state policymakers and ABE providers should adopt a goal of integrating career pathways and bridge programs to streamline and shorten the process for adult learners to obtain the training and education they need to attain a certificate or degree, a higher-wage job, and financial independence.

    This policy page provides an overview of the adult basic education and literacy system in Texas and makes recommendations for strengthening the ABE and literacy framework to reach more students and improve outcomes for adult learners. (author abstract)

    Texas can do better to strengthen the adult basic education and literacy system to move more Texans into a family-supporting career. To make system-wide changes to the way adult basic education is delivered and improve outcomes for adult learners in Texas, state policymakers and ABE providers should adopt a goal of integrating career pathways and bridge programs to streamline and shorten the process for adult learners to obtain the training and education they need to attain a certificate or degree, a higher-wage job, and financial independence.

    This policy page provides an overview of the adult basic education and literacy system in Texas and makes recommendations for strengthening the ABE and literacy framework to reach more students and improve outcomes for adult learners. (author abstract)

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