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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Passarella, Letitia; Born, Catherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Assignments to education and training activities among the welfare caseload nearly tripled between October 2007 and October 2010. This report provides a demographic profile of the caseheads assigned to an education and training activity in October 2010 and also reviews their TCA and employment histories. (author abstract)

    Assignments to education and training activities among the welfare caseload nearly tripled between October 2007 and October 2010. This report provides a demographic profile of the caseheads assigned to an education and training activity in October 2010 and also reviews their TCA and employment histories. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Riccio, James A.
    Year: 2006

    According to MDRC’s 2005 evaluation report, Promoting Work in Public Housing: The Effectiveness of Jobs-Plus, the program substantially boosted earnings for people in high-poverty housing developments where it was properly implemented. The study offers the first hard evidence that a work-focused intervention based in a public housing environment can effectively promote residents’ self-sufficiency.

    The earnings effects of the program are particularly significant for at least four reasons: (1) they occurred in high-poverty public housing environments; (2) the effects were substantial and sustained throughout the four-year follow-up period; (3) they occurred for very different types of residents in very different cities; and (4) they occurred in both good economic times and bad.

    For policymakers, the findings point to a promising strategy for increasing employment opportunities and self-sufficiency among public housing residents — a longstanding bipartisan goal and one that is enshrined in the federal Quality of Housing and Work Responsibility Act (QHWRA) of...

    According to MDRC’s 2005 evaluation report, Promoting Work in Public Housing: The Effectiveness of Jobs-Plus, the program substantially boosted earnings for people in high-poverty housing developments where it was properly implemented. The study offers the first hard evidence that a work-focused intervention based in a public housing environment can effectively promote residents’ self-sufficiency.

    The earnings effects of the program are particularly significant for at least four reasons: (1) they occurred in high-poverty public housing environments; (2) the effects were substantial and sustained throughout the four-year follow-up period; (3) they occurred for very different types of residents in very different cities; and (4) they occurred in both good economic times and bad.

    For policymakers, the findings point to a promising strategy for increasing employment opportunities and self-sufficiency among public housing residents — a longstanding bipartisan goal and one that is enshrined in the federal Quality of Housing and Work Responsibility Act (QHWRA) of 1998.

    In my testimony, I would like to tell you about the origins of Jobs-Plus, how we evaluated it, what we found, and what policymakers might consider doing with the results. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Clagett, Craig A.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1997

    In an effort to reevaluate employment preparation in community college curricula, a review of recent research was conducted to identify the most valued skills in today's workforce. Among the abilities desired by today's employers are: (1) knowing how to learn; (2) competence in reading, writing, and computation; (3) effective listening and oral communication skills; (4) adaptability through creative thinking and problem solving; (5) personal management with strong self esteem and initiative; (6) interpersonal skills; and (7) leadership effectiveness. This comprehensive skill set, once required only of managers, but now applying to all levels of employment, appeared in several employer surveys, with an additional emphasis on communication and computer/technical skills. (Author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

    In an effort to reevaluate employment preparation in community college curricula, a review of recent research was conducted to identify the most valued skills in today's workforce. Among the abilities desired by today's employers are: (1) knowing how to learn; (2) competence in reading, writing, and computation; (3) effective listening and oral communication skills; (4) adaptability through creative thinking and problem solving; (5) personal management with strong self esteem and initiative; (6) interpersonal skills; and (7) leadership effectiveness. This comprehensive skill set, once required only of managers, but now applying to all levels of employment, appeared in several employer surveys, with an additional emphasis on communication and computer/technical skills. (Author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

  • Individual Author: Family Welfare Research and Training Group
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2002

    This report provides outcome data on a two-year (1998 - 2000) demonstration project which allowed 200 adult learners to count academic activity at the Baltimore City Community College (BCCC) as their obligatory work activity under the Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA) program. The purpose of the pilot project, Investing My Potential to Attain College Training (IMPACT 2000), was to test whether Baltimore City TCA customers completing BCCC certificate or degree programs fared better in the labor market than those who did not participate. Criteria for participation in the pilot program were spelled out in a 1998 letter from the Department of Human Resources (DHR) to TCA customers: "currently enrolled in a full-time BCCC certificate or Associate of Arts program; or dropped out [during the 1997-98 year], but planning to re-register for a certificate or Associate of Arts program; and can complete [your] course of studies within two years in an educational program that will directly lead to a job; and maintain at least a C average" (Mahon, 1998).

    The School of Social Work,...

    This report provides outcome data on a two-year (1998 - 2000) demonstration project which allowed 200 adult learners to count academic activity at the Baltimore City Community College (BCCC) as their obligatory work activity under the Temporary Cash Assistance (TCA) program. The purpose of the pilot project, Investing My Potential to Attain College Training (IMPACT 2000), was to test whether Baltimore City TCA customers completing BCCC certificate or degree programs fared better in the labor market than those who did not participate. Criteria for participation in the pilot program were spelled out in a 1998 letter from the Department of Human Resources (DHR) to TCA customers: "currently enrolled in a full-time BCCC certificate or Associate of Arts program; or dropped out [during the 1997-98 year], but planning to re-register for a certificate or Associate of Arts program; and can complete [your] course of studies within two years in an educational program that will directly lead to a job; and maintain at least a C average" (Mahon, 1998).

    The School of Social Work, University of Maryland-Baltimore was asked by DHR to design and carry out research, using administrative data, to document key employment and welfare participation outcomes of the pilot project. Today s document represents the final report of our work in this area. Specifically, the report presents the education, employment and welfare outcomes of students who took part in the pilot educational program and compares them to data for a comparable group of TCA customers who were not enrolled in the BCCC program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fraker, Thomas M.; Levy, Dan M.; Olsen, Robert B.; Stapulonis, Rita A.
    Year: 2004

    The $3 billion Welfare-to-Work (WtW) grants program established by Congress as part of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 provided funds to over 700 state and local grantees. Congress appropriated funds for FY1998 and FY1999, and grantees were allowed five years to spend their funds.1 The intent of the grants program, administered at the national level by the U.S. Department of Labor, was to supplement the welfare reform funds included in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grants to states, which were authorized under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA).2 WtW funds were to support programs—especially those in high-poverty communities—to assist the least employable, most disadvantaged welfare recipients and noncustodial parents make the transition from welfare to work. (author abstract)

    The $3 billion Welfare-to-Work (WtW) grants program established by Congress as part of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 provided funds to over 700 state and local grantees. Congress appropriated funds for FY1998 and FY1999, and grantees were allowed five years to spend their funds.1 The intent of the grants program, administered at the national level by the U.S. Department of Labor, was to supplement the welfare reform funds included in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grants to states, which were authorized under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA).2 WtW funds were to support programs—especially those in high-poverty communities—to assist the least employable, most disadvantaged welfare recipients and noncustodial parents make the transition from welfare to work. (author abstract)

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