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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Riccio, James A.
    Year: 2006

    According to MDRC’s 2005 evaluation report, Promoting Work in Public Housing: The Effectiveness of Jobs-Plus, the program substantially boosted earnings for people in high-poverty housing developments where it was properly implemented. The study offers the first hard evidence that a work-focused intervention based in a public housing environment can effectively promote residents’ self-sufficiency.

    The earnings effects of the program are particularly significant for at least four reasons: (1) they occurred in high-poverty public housing environments; (2) the effects were substantial and sustained throughout the four-year follow-up period; (3) they occurred for very different types of residents in very different cities; and (4) they occurred in both good economic times and bad.

    For policymakers, the findings point to a promising strategy for increasing employment opportunities and self-sufficiency among public housing residents — a longstanding bipartisan goal and one that is enshrined in the federal Quality of Housing and Work Responsibility Act (QHWRA) of...

    According to MDRC’s 2005 evaluation report, Promoting Work in Public Housing: The Effectiveness of Jobs-Plus, the program substantially boosted earnings for people in high-poverty housing developments where it was properly implemented. The study offers the first hard evidence that a work-focused intervention based in a public housing environment can effectively promote residents’ self-sufficiency.

    The earnings effects of the program are particularly significant for at least four reasons: (1) they occurred in high-poverty public housing environments; (2) the effects were substantial and sustained throughout the four-year follow-up period; (3) they occurred for very different types of residents in very different cities; and (4) they occurred in both good economic times and bad.

    For policymakers, the findings point to a promising strategy for increasing employment opportunities and self-sufficiency among public housing residents — a longstanding bipartisan goal and one that is enshrined in the federal Quality of Housing and Work Responsibility Act (QHWRA) of 1998.

    In my testimony, I would like to tell you about the origins of Jobs-Plus, how we evaluated it, what we found, and what policymakers might consider doing with the results. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Clagett, Craig A.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 1997

    In an effort to reevaluate employment preparation in community college curricula, a review of recent research was conducted to identify the most valued skills in today's workforce. Among the abilities desired by today's employers are: (1) knowing how to learn; (2) competence in reading, writing, and computation; (3) effective listening and oral communication skills; (4) adaptability through creative thinking and problem solving; (5) personal management with strong self esteem and initiative; (6) interpersonal skills; and (7) leadership effectiveness. This comprehensive skill set, once required only of managers, but now applying to all levels of employment, appeared in several employer surveys, with an additional emphasis on communication and computer/technical skills. (Author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

    In an effort to reevaluate employment preparation in community college curricula, a review of recent research was conducted to identify the most valued skills in today's workforce. Among the abilities desired by today's employers are: (1) knowing how to learn; (2) competence in reading, writing, and computation; (3) effective listening and oral communication skills; (4) adaptability through creative thinking and problem solving; (5) personal management with strong self esteem and initiative; (6) interpersonal skills; and (7) leadership effectiveness. This comprehensive skill set, once required only of managers, but now applying to all levels of employment, appeared in several employer surveys, with an additional emphasis on communication and computer/technical skills. (Author abstract)

    The original hyperlink to this resource has been removed by the publisher. You may obtain a single use PDF by emailing the SSRC at ssrc@opressrc.org.

  • Individual Author: Fraker, Thomas M.; Levy, Dan M.; Olsen, Robert B.; Stapulonis, Rita A.
    Year: 2004

    The $3 billion Welfare-to-Work (WtW) grants program established by Congress as part of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 provided funds to over 700 state and local grantees. Congress appropriated funds for FY1998 and FY1999, and grantees were allowed five years to spend their funds.1 The intent of the grants program, administered at the national level by the U.S. Department of Labor, was to supplement the welfare reform funds included in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grants to states, which were authorized under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA).2 WtW funds were to support programs—especially those in high-poverty communities—to assist the least employable, most disadvantaged welfare recipients and noncustodial parents make the transition from welfare to work. (author abstract)

    The $3 billion Welfare-to-Work (WtW) grants program established by Congress as part of the Balanced Budget Act (BBA) of 1997 provided funds to over 700 state and local grantees. Congress appropriated funds for FY1998 and FY1999, and grantees were allowed five years to spend their funds.1 The intent of the grants program, administered at the national level by the U.S. Department of Labor, was to supplement the welfare reform funds included in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) block grants to states, which were authorized under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA).2 WtW funds were to support programs—especially those in high-poverty communities—to assist the least employable, most disadvantaged welfare recipients and noncustodial parents make the transition from welfare to work. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Burnett, Kimberly; Woodford, Michelle; Kaul, Bulbul; St. George, Anne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The Center for Working Families (CWF) is built on the premise that many barriers prevent low-income working families from improving their incomes, building their assets, and achieving economic security. As such, CWF sites have adopted a comprehensive service model that emphasizes three areas: employment and education services, income and work supports, and financial education and asset-building services. “Coaching” support is provided to participants by program staff who serve as financial guidance counselors or case managers.

    ...

    This study assesses whether Center for Working Families (CWF) families experience income growth and other financial achievements – both behavioral and monetary – over the course of their participation in the program. Participants at three CWF sites are included in this study: Bon Secours of Maryland Foundation in Baltimore, Maryland; Central New Mexico Community College in Albuquerque, New Mexico; and the St. Louis Metropolitan Education and Training, or MET Center, in Missouri. A previous work established and analyzed participants'...

    The Center for Working Families (CWF) is built on the premise that many barriers prevent low-income working families from improving their incomes, building their assets, and achieving economic security. As such, CWF sites have adopted a comprehensive service model that emphasizes three areas: employment and education services, income and work supports, and financial education and asset-building services. “Coaching” support is provided to participants by program staff who serve as financial guidance counselors or case managers.

    ...

    This study assesses whether Center for Working Families (CWF) families experience income growth and other financial achievements – both behavioral and monetary – over the course of their participation in the program. Participants at three CWF sites are included in this study: Bon Secours of Maryland Foundation in Baltimore, Maryland; Central New Mexico Community College in Albuquerque, New Mexico; and the St. Louis Metropolitan Education and Training, or MET Center, in Missouri. A previous work established and analyzed participants' baseline circumstances. This brief builds on previous studies by incorporating data from a reports, administrative data from each of the sites, and other sources of information to measure participants’ progress over time by addressing several questions about financial progress. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Kemple, James J.; Willner, Cynthia J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Established more than 30 years ago, Career Academies have become a widely used high school reform initiative that aims to keep students engaged in school and prepare them for successful transitions to postsecondary education and employment. Typically serving between 150 and 200 students from grades 9 or 10 through grade 12, Career Academies are organized as small learning communities, combine academic and technical curricula around a career theme, and establish partnerships with local employers to provide work-based learning opportunities. There are estimated to be more than 2,500 Career Academies operating around the country. Since 1993, MDRC has been conducting a uniquely rigorous evaluation of the Career Academy approach that uses a random assignment research design in a diverse group of nine high schools across the United States. Located in medium- and large-sized school districts, the schools confront many of the educational challenges found in low-income urban settings. The participating Career Academies were able to implement and sustain the core features of the approach,...

    Established more than 30 years ago, Career Academies have become a widely used high school reform initiative that aims to keep students engaged in school and prepare them for successful transitions to postsecondary education and employment. Typically serving between 150 and 200 students from grades 9 or 10 through grade 12, Career Academies are organized as small learning communities, combine academic and technical curricula around a career theme, and establish partnerships with local employers to provide work-based learning opportunities. There are estimated to be more than 2,500 Career Academies operating around the country. Since 1993, MDRC has been conducting a uniquely rigorous evaluation of the Career Academy approach that uses a random assignment research design in a diverse group of nine high schools across the United States. Located in medium- and large-sized school districts, the schools confront many of the educational challenges found in low-income urban settings. The participating Career Academies were able to implement and sustain the core features of the approach, and they served a cross-section of the student populations in their host schools. This report describes how Career Academies influenced students’ labor market prospects and postsecondary educational attainment in the eight years following their expected graduation. The results are based on the experiences of more than 1,400 young people, approximately 85 percent of whom are Hispanic or African-American. (author abstract)

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