Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Perez-Johnson, Irma; Moore, Quinn; Santillano, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    Following passage of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), local workforce investment areas have been required to use individual training accounts (ITAs) to fund most occupational training activities. With some restrictions, customers of the One-Stop system can use ITAs to select training from a wide array of state-approved programs and providers. States and local offices have a great deal of flexibility in deciding how to structure ITAs. At one extreme, local counselors can play a pivotal role in directing customers to particular training programs and closely tailoring ITA award amounts to each customer’s needs. At the other extreme, local staff can play a minor role, providing all customers with the same fixed ITA amounts, allowing customers to choose their training programs independently, and providing counseling only on request.

    This report presents long-term results from an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of three different models for delivering ITA services, with impacts measured six to eight years after program enrollment. The Employment and...

    Following passage of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), local workforce investment areas have been required to use individual training accounts (ITAs) to fund most occupational training activities. With some restrictions, customers of the One-Stop system can use ITAs to select training from a wide array of state-approved programs and providers. States and local offices have a great deal of flexibility in deciding how to structure ITAs. At one extreme, local counselors can play a pivotal role in directing customers to particular training programs and closely tailoring ITA award amounts to each customer’s needs. At the other extreme, local staff can play a minor role, providing all customers with the same fixed ITA amounts, allowing customers to choose their training programs independently, and providing counseling only on request.

    This report presents long-term results from an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of three different models for delivering ITA services, with impacts measured six to eight years after program enrollment. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) at the U.S. Department of Labor designed the ITA experiment to provide federal, state, and local policymakers, administrators, and program managers with information on the tradeoffs inherent in different ITA service delivery models.

    As a part of the experiment, nearly 8,000 customers of One-Stop Centers in eight different sites were randomly assigned to one of the three ITA service delivery models tested in the ITA Experiment. These models varied along three policy-relevant dimensions (Table ES.1): (1) the ITA award structure (that is, whether the award amount was fixed for all customers or tailored to the customer’s needs); (2) required counseling (that is, whether ITA counseling was mandatory or optional, and its intensity); and (3) program approval (that is, whether counselors could reject customers’ training choices and deny an ITA, or had to approve them if the customer had completed his or her ITA requirements). (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: National Governor's Association (NGA) Center For Best Practices
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2007

    Research studies during the past decade have shown that despite the large number of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients entering the workforce, many of these individuals have difficulty remaining employed and advancing in the labor market.

    Governors and other state leaders are in a strong position to assume a lead role in developing programs and policies that help TANF and low-income families achieve long-term self-sufficiency through stable employment. This Issue Brief lays out ways states can create opportunities for TANF clients and low-wage workers to advance in the labor market, including:
    -Helping them prepare for success in the workforce through education and skills development activities, career and work readiness credentials, and postsecondary education;
    -Establishing "launching pads" that can help them quickly advance in the labor market through such efforts as transitional jobs programs and career ladder strategies; and
    -Providing them with ongoing support through earnings supplements, earnings disregards, work...

    Research studies during the past decade have shown that despite the large number of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients entering the workforce, many of these individuals have difficulty remaining employed and advancing in the labor market.

    Governors and other state leaders are in a strong position to assume a lead role in developing programs and policies that help TANF and low-income families achieve long-term self-sufficiency through stable employment. This Issue Brief lays out ways states can create opportunities for TANF clients and low-wage workers to advance in the labor market, including:
    -Helping them prepare for success in the workforce through education and skills development activities, career and work readiness credentials, and postsecondary education;
    -Establishing "launching pads" that can help them quickly advance in the labor market through such efforts as transitional jobs programs and career ladder strategies; and
    -Providing them with ongoing support through earnings supplements, earnings disregards, work support benefits, and child and earned income tax credits.
    (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Eberts, Randall W.; O'Leary, Christopher J.; Wandmer, Stephen A.
    Year: 2002

    This book offers a thorough overview of the U.S. experience with targeting reemployment services and self-employment assistance to UI beneficiaries most likely to exhaust benefits. The authors also suggest other programs that might benefit from targeting, examine Canadian efforts at targeting reemployment services, and consider prospects for a new Frontline Decision Support System for one-stop centers. (author abstract)

    Contents:

    1. Targeting Employment Services under the Workforce Investment Act / Stephen A. Wandner
    2. Predicting the Exhaustion of Unemployment Compensation / Robert B. Olsen, Marisa Kelso, Paul T. Decker, and Daniel H. Klepinger ; comments by Mark C. Berger
    3. Evaluation of WPRS Systems / Katherine P. Dickinson, Paul T. Decker, and Suzanne D. Kreutzer ; comments by John Heinberg, Walter Nicholson
    4. A Panel Discussion on the WPRS System / Pete Fleming, Al Jaloviar, Helen Parker, and Marc Perrett ; comments by David E. Balducchi
    5. Profiling in Self-Employment Assistance Programs / Jon C. Messenger, Carolyn...

    This book offers a thorough overview of the U.S. experience with targeting reemployment services and self-employment assistance to UI beneficiaries most likely to exhaust benefits. The authors also suggest other programs that might benefit from targeting, examine Canadian efforts at targeting reemployment services, and consider prospects for a new Frontline Decision Support System for one-stop centers. (author abstract)

    Contents:

    1. Targeting Employment Services under the Workforce Investment Act / Stephen A. Wandner
    2. Predicting the Exhaustion of Unemployment Compensation / Robert B. Olsen, Marisa Kelso, Paul T. Decker, and Daniel H. Klepinger ; comments by Mark C. Berger
    3. Evaluation of WPRS Systems / Katherine P. Dickinson, Paul T. Decker, and Suzanne D. Kreutzer ; comments by John Heinberg, Walter Nicholson
    4. A Panel Discussion on the WPRS System / Pete Fleming, Al Jaloviar, Helen Parker, and Marc Perrett ; comments by David E. Balducchi
    5. Profiling in Self-Employment Assistance Programs / Jon C. Messenger, Carolyn Peterson-Vaccaro, and Wayne Vroman ; comments by Jacob M. Benus, Wayne Gordon
    6. Targeting Reemployment Bonuses / Christopher J. O'Leary, Paul T. Decker, and Stephen A. Wandner ; comments by Jennifer Warlick
    7. Measures of Program Performance and the Training Choices of Displaced Workers / Louis Jacobson, Robert LaLonde, and Daniel Sullivan ; comments by Kevin Hollenbeck
    8. Using Statistical Assessment Tools to Target Services to Work First Participants / Randall W. Eberts
    9. Targeting Job Retention Services for Welfare Recipients / Anu Rangarajan, Peter Schochet, and Dexter Chu ; comments by Timothy J. Bartik, Don Oellerich
    10. Targeting Reemployment Services in Canada / Terry Colpitts ; comments by Jeffrey Smith
    11. Predicting Long-Term Unemployment in Canada: Prospects and Policy Implications / Ging Wong, Harold Henson, and Arun Roy ; comments by Jeffrey Smith
    12. A Frontline Decision Support System for One-Stop Centers / Randall W. Eberts, Christopher J. O'Leary, and Kelly J. DeRango ; comments by Helen Parker
    13. A Panel Discussion on the Experience and Future Plans of States / Rich Hobbie, Jim Finch, Chuck Middlebrooks, and Jack Weidenbach
  • Individual Author: Holzer, Harry
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 1996

    A very important contribution to the field of labor economics, and in particular to the understanding of the labor market for workers with relatively low skill levels. I think we have the sense that the market looks bad, but haven't been clear on how bad it is, or how it got that way. What Employers Want provides some of the answers and identifies the important questions. It is essential reading. —Jeffrey S. Zax, University of Colorado at Boulder

    The substantial deterioration in employment and earnings among the nation's less-educated workers, especially minorities and younger males in the nation's big cities, has been tentatively ascribed to a variety of causes: an increase in required job skills, the movement of companies from the cities to the suburbs, and a rising unwillingness to hire minority job seekers. What Employers Want is the first book to replace conjecture about today's job market with first-hand information gleaned from employers about who gets hired. Drawn from a survey of over 3,000 employers in four major metropolitan areas—Los Angeles, Boston, Atlanta,...

    A very important contribution to the field of labor economics, and in particular to the understanding of the labor market for workers with relatively low skill levels. I think we have the sense that the market looks bad, but haven't been clear on how bad it is, or how it got that way. What Employers Want provides some of the answers and identifies the important questions. It is essential reading. —Jeffrey S. Zax, University of Colorado at Boulder

    The substantial deterioration in employment and earnings among the nation's less-educated workers, especially minorities and younger males in the nation's big cities, has been tentatively ascribed to a variety of causes: an increase in required job skills, the movement of companies from the cities to the suburbs, and a rising unwillingness to hire minority job seekers. What Employers Want is the first book to replace conjecture about today's job market with first-hand information gleaned from employers about who gets hired. Drawn from a survey of over 3,000 employers in four major metropolitan areas—Los Angeles, Boston, Atlanta, and Detroit—this volume provides a wealth of data on what jobs are available to the less-educated, in what industries, what skills they require, where they are located, what they pay, and how they are filled.

    The evidence points to a dramatic surge in suburban, white-collar jobs. The manufacturing industry—once a steady employer of blue-collar workers—has been eclipsed by the expanding retail trade and service industries, where the vast majority of jobs are in clerical, managerial, or sales positions. Since manufacturing establishments have been the most likely employers to move from the central cities to the suburbs, the shortage of jobs for low-skill urban workers is particularly acute. In the central cities, the problem is compounded and available jobs remain vacant because employers increasingly require greater cognitive and social skills as well as specific job-related experience. Holzer reveals the extent to which minorities are routinely excluded by employer recruitment and screening practices that rely heavily on testing, informal referrals, and stable work histories. The inaccessible location and discriminatory hiring patterns of suburban employers further limit the hiring of black males in particular, while earnings, especially for minority females, remain low.

    Proponents of welfare reform often assume that stricter work requirements and shorter eligibility periods will effectively channel welfare recipients toward steady employment and off federal subsidies. What Employers Want directly challenges this premise and demonstrates that only concerted efforts to close the gap between urban employers and inner city residents can produce healthy levels of employment in the nation's cities. Professor Holzer outlines the measures that will be necessary—targeted education and training programs, improved transportation and job placement, heightened enforcement of anti-discrimination laws, and aggressive job creation strategies. Repairing urban labor markets will not be easy. This book shows why. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Alamprese, Judith A. ; Gwaltney, M. K.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    This document is the final report from the Adult Basic Education State Delivery System Strategic Planning and Service Provision Demonstration Project, also known as the Adult Education Coordination and Planning (AECAP) project. AECAP tested processes for state and local planning and interagency coordination as a way of facilitating the expansion and quality of adult education and workforce services in six states (Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Missouri, and Washington). This final report describes the planning processes and technical assistance activities that were conducted during the project.

    The state adult education staff and their partners in the AECAP project worked together to support 12 local pilot sites in their development of service models in the areas identified by the state. Nine of the 12 local pilot sites in the AECAP project involved state staff working with their partners to develop coordinated service models, which included the following: (1) Cross-referral of clients between ABE programs and One-Stop Centers (three sites); (2) Targeted...

    This document is the final report from the Adult Basic Education State Delivery System Strategic Planning and Service Provision Demonstration Project, also known as the Adult Education Coordination and Planning (AECAP) project. AECAP tested processes for state and local planning and interagency coordination as a way of facilitating the expansion and quality of adult education and workforce services in six states (Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Missouri, and Washington). This final report describes the planning processes and technical assistance activities that were conducted during the project.

    The state adult education staff and their partners in the AECAP project worked together to support 12 local pilot sites in their development of service models in the areas identified by the state. Nine of the 12 local pilot sites in the AECAP project involved state staff working with their partners to develop coordinated service models, which included the following: (1) Cross-referral of clients between ABE programs and One-Stop Centers (three sites); (2) Targeted instructional services for specific ABE populations (three sites); and (3) Provision of integrated ABE/ESL and occupational courses as a pathway to employment or postsecondary technical training (three sites) (Author Abstract).

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1996 to 2016

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations