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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Tao, Fumiyo; Alamprese, Judith A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2003

    The Family Independence Initiative (FII) was developed by the National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL) in 1997 to test the feasibility of implementing work-focused family literacy programs as an educational intervention to assist welfare recipients in meeting the requirements of welfare reform. The FII enhanced the services provided in NCFL’s comprehensive family literacy program, which consists of early childhood education, adult basic and literacy education, Parent and Child Together (PACT) Time, and Parent Time, by incorporating work-preparation and work-experience activities into the adult education component of family literacy. The assumption was that current or former welfare recipients could simultaneously develop their basic skills and learn strategies for obtaining and retaining employment as part of their family literacy experience.

    A key factor prompting the development of FII was the policy changes that were part of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of...

    The Family Independence Initiative (FII) was developed by the National Center for Family Literacy (NCFL) in 1997 to test the feasibility of implementing work-focused family literacy programs as an educational intervention to assist welfare recipients in meeting the requirements of welfare reform. The FII enhanced the services provided in NCFL’s comprehensive family literacy program, which consists of early childhood education, adult basic and literacy education, Parent and Child Together (PACT) Time, and Parent Time, by incorporating work-preparation and work-experience activities into the adult education component of family literacy. The assumption was that current or former welfare recipients could simultaneously develop their basic skills and learn strategies for obtaining and retaining employment as part of their family literacy experience.

    A key factor prompting the development of FII was the policy changes that were part of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program under the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996. This law shifted the focus of the nation’s welfare program from the provision of cash assistance to low-income parents to the promotion of work-preparation services and economic self-sufficiency. Two new mandates were instituted under TANF: a five-year, lifetime limit on adults’ eligibility to receive welfare cash assistance and a requirement that recipients participate in work-preparation services in order to receive the cash assistance. As social programs serving welfare recipients were preparing to address these policy changes, there were few models of service delivery available to help program participants obtain and retain employment, earn sufficient income, and support the economic needs of their families without government cash assistance. As a result, a number of state and local initiatives were developed to explore different welfare-to-work strategies to move welfare recipients into employment…

    The FII Follow-up Study had the following objectives:

    • To describe FII adult participants’ employment and educational outcomes, parenting practices, and social and community involvement one year after FII participation;
    • To describe the employment and educational experiences of participants during the two years after their participation in FII; and
    • To describe adult participants’ perceptions of what they learned from FII and its effects on their lives.

    (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Liston, Cynthia D.; Donnan, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Casey's Center for Working Families (CWF) partnered with community college programs across the county to help low-income students access, navigate and complete their community college courses. Detailed case studies show how five of these programs are making a difference. (Author abstract)

    Casey's Center for Working Families (CWF) partnered with community college programs across the county to help low-income students access, navigate and complete their community college courses. Detailed case studies show how five of these programs are making a difference. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: King, Elisabeth; Elliott, Mark
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    This report describes family centered employment strategies. It begins with a look at the economics of families in poverty and provides a brief outline of the many ways in which employment and training programs have begun to work with families. The report then examines the work of four employment programs now offering employment services to families: (1) a transitional employment program; (2) a refugee resettlement program; (3) a youth employment program; and (4) a faith-based program. The key elements that have enabled these programs to provide services successfully are discussed. The major federal programs used to meet the employment needs of the poor, however, remain focused principally on serving individuals. Recent Clinton administration proposals indicate that the family is beginning to occupy a more central place in the discussion of federal employment programs. Until public resources are available, it seems unlikely that many organizations will make the extraordinary effort to combine multiple revenue sources needed to serve families' employment needs successfully. An...

    This report describes family centered employment strategies. It begins with a look at the economics of families in poverty and provides a brief outline of the many ways in which employment and training programs have begun to work with families. The report then examines the work of four employment programs now offering employment services to families: (1) a transitional employment program; (2) a refugee resettlement program; (3) a youth employment program; and (4) a faith-based program. The key elements that have enabled these programs to provide services successfully are discussed. The major federal programs used to meet the employment needs of the poor, however, remain focused principally on serving individuals. Recent Clinton administration proposals indicate that the family is beginning to occupy a more central place in the discussion of federal employment programs. Until public resources are available, it seems unlikely that many organizations will make the extraordinary effort to combine multiple revenue sources needed to serve families' employment needs successfully. An appendix describes the four programs in detail.

  • Individual Author: Montes, Marcela
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2013

    This presentation describes first-year implementation findings from the Accelerating Opportunity (AO) initiative. AO seeks to improve the ability of students with low basic skills to earn valued occupational credentials by enrolling them in for-credit career and technical education courses at local community colleges as they improve their basic education and English language skills.  

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    This presentation describes first-year implementation findings from the Accelerating Opportunity (AO) initiative. AO seeks to improve the ability of students with low basic skills to earn valued occupational credentials by enrolling them in for-credit career and technical education courses at local community colleges as they improve their basic education and English language skills.  

    This presentation was given at the 2013 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Brown, David; Maxwell, Sarah; DeJesus, Edward; Schiraldi, Vincent
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2002

    In 1999, the Annie E. Casey Foundation asked the National Youth Employment Coalition (NYEC), in cooperation with the Youth Development and Research Fund (YDRF) and the Justice Policy Institute (JPI), to build on the task force’s work. The Foundation wanted to identify what works: exemplary programs and policy initiatives that help court-involved youth become economically self-sufficient…

    The national study undertaken by NYEC, JPI, and YDRF had three objectives:

    • Identify barriers to reform of the juvenile justice system and review the literature on youth employment, workforce development, and juvenile justice.
    • Survey and synthesize information about innovative state and local policy initiatives that promote effective programming.
    • Examine exemplary youth employment and development programs that explicitly serve juvenile
    • offenders…

    The 19 policies profiled here fall into several categories: innovative approaches, new ways to allocate funds and develop resources, ways to promote collaboration among various groups, ways to...

    In 1999, the Annie E. Casey Foundation asked the National Youth Employment Coalition (NYEC), in cooperation with the Youth Development and Research Fund (YDRF) and the Justice Policy Institute (JPI), to build on the task force’s work. The Foundation wanted to identify what works: exemplary programs and policy initiatives that help court-involved youth become economically self-sufficient…

    The national study undertaken by NYEC, JPI, and YDRF had three objectives:

    • Identify barriers to reform of the juvenile justice system and review the literature on youth employment, workforce development, and juvenile justice.
    • Survey and synthesize information about innovative state and local policy initiatives that promote effective programming.
    • Examine exemplary youth employment and development programs that explicitly serve juvenile
    • offenders…

    The 19 policies profiled here fall into several categories: innovative approaches, new ways to allocate funds and develop resources, ways to promote collaboration among various groups, ways to promote system flexibility or system reform, and one policy initiative that can be viewed more strictly as youth development. Most of the policies cross categories and definitions. (author introduction)

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