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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Zachry Rutschow, Elizabeth; Cullinan, Dan; Welbeck, Rashida
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Improving the success of academically underprepared students who are in need of developmental (or remedial) education is a key challenge facing community colleges today. Many of these students enter college with little awareness of these institutions’ expectations or a clear model for how to make effective decisions about their academic careers. To help students address these challenges, a number of colleges across the country have looked to success courses (also called study skills, student development, or new student orientation courses). This report analyzes a success course for developmental education students at Guilford Technical Community College in Greensboro, North Carolina, and its impact on students’ psychosocial skills and behaviors and academic achievement.

    After joining Achieving the Dream: Community Colleges Count in 2004, a national organization designed to mentor colleges through an institutionwide, student success-oriented improvement process, Guilford chose to offer a revised version of its student success course to developmental education students,...

    Improving the success of academically underprepared students who are in need of developmental (or remedial) education is a key challenge facing community colleges today. Many of these students enter college with little awareness of these institutions’ expectations or a clear model for how to make effective decisions about their academic careers. To help students address these challenges, a number of colleges across the country have looked to success courses (also called study skills, student development, or new student orientation courses). This report analyzes a success course for developmental education students at Guilford Technical Community College in Greensboro, North Carolina, and its impact on students’ psychosocial skills and behaviors and academic achievement.

    After joining Achieving the Dream: Community Colleges Count in 2004, a national organization designed to mentor colleges through an institutionwide, student success-oriented improvement process, Guilford chose to offer a revised version of its student success course to developmental education students, aimed at improving psychosocial awareness and academic achievement. Modeled on Skip Downing’s On Course philosophy and curriculum, it placed an intensive focus on changing students’ behaviors and attitudes, including increasing their awareness of their and others’ emotions, understanding their own learning styles, improving time management skills, and recognizing their responsibility for their own learning. Guilford hoped that these changes in students’ personal habits and behaviors might help them take better control of their academic lives, which would ultimately result in gains in achievement.

    This study employed random assignment methodology to examine the impact of Guilford’s success course. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bittle-Patton, Sylvia
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2004

    For over a decade, the issues of welfare reform and unemployment have been high priorities at the national level. Surveys were administered to participants in three training agencies to examine individual pre-training attitudinal and behavioral variables, including self-efficacy, employment commitment, and unemployment negativity. The study then examined the relationship between these variables and post-training job-search behavior, employment status, and job-search intended effort of unemployed trainees. The behavioral plasticity hypothesis was also explored in conjunction with the variables of general and specific self-efficacy, employment commitment, and unemployment negativity. Hierarchical regression analyses of data from 121 participants revealed that pre-training specific self-efficacy and unemployment negativity were both significant predictors of post-training job-search behavior and frequency. Thus, trainees with higher levels of pre-training specific self-efficacy and unemployment negativity also reported more varied and frequent post-training job-search behavior....

    For over a decade, the issues of welfare reform and unemployment have been high priorities at the national level. Surveys were administered to participants in three training agencies to examine individual pre-training attitudinal and behavioral variables, including self-efficacy, employment commitment, and unemployment negativity. The study then examined the relationship between these variables and post-training job-search behavior, employment status, and job-search intended effort of unemployed trainees. The behavioral plasticity hypothesis was also explored in conjunction with the variables of general and specific self-efficacy, employment commitment, and unemployment negativity. Hierarchical regression analyses of data from 121 participants revealed that pre-training specific self-efficacy and unemployment negativity were both significant predictors of post-training job-search behavior and frequency. Thus, trainees with higher levels of pre-training specific self-efficacy and unemployment negativity also reported more varied and frequent post-training job-search behavior. Further, results of logistic regression analysis indicated that unemployment negativity was a significant predictor of post-training employment status. Specifically, trainees with high initial levels of unemployment negativity were twice as likely to find post-training employment. Although not hypothesized, the demographic variables of marital status, reasons for unemployment, and income also significantly predicted post-training employment status. More specifically, trainees who were single had a greater likelihood of post-training job placement in comparison to married trainees. Further, respondents who were unemployed because of a disability or other health-related issue were less likely to find employment after training than their counterparts. In addition, trainees with higher levels of income were more likely to find post-training employment than those with lower income levels. The behavioral plasticity effect, however, was not supported with either predictor variable when job-search behavior and frequency was used as the outcome variable. Post-hoc analysis revealed pre-training employment commitment as a significant predictor of post-training employment status. Specifically, participants with higher levels of pre-training employment commitment were almost three-times more likely to find employment after training than their counterparts. Post-hoc analyses also found that both specific self-efficacy and unemployment negativity mediate the relationship between employment commitment and post-training job-search behavior and frequency. Several implications of the study are discussed and areas for future research are explored. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Ehrle Macomber, Jennifer; Cuccaro-Alamin, Stephanie; Duncan, Dean; Kuehn, Daniel; McDaniel, Marla; Vericker, Tracy; Pergamit, Mike; Needell, Barbara; Kum, Hye-Chung; Stewart, Joy; Lee, Chung-Kwon ; Barth, Richard P.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    This study examines employment outcomes for youth who age out of foster care through their middle twenties in three states: California, Minnesota, and North Carolina. The study linked child welfare, Unemployment Insurance (UI), and public assistance administrative data to assess outcomes. Results suggest that youth who age out of foster care continue to experience poor employment outcomes at age 24 and generally follow one of four employment trajectories as they transition to adulthood.(author abstract)

    This study examines employment outcomes for youth who age out of foster care through their middle twenties in three states: California, Minnesota, and North Carolina. The study linked child welfare, Unemployment Insurance (UI), and public assistance administrative data to assess outcomes. Results suggest that youth who age out of foster care continue to experience poor employment outcomes at age 24 and generally follow one of four employment trajectories as they transition to adulthood.(author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Comings, John P.; Cuban, Sondra; Bos, Johannes; Taylor, Catherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2001

    Learning to read and write is a serious challenge for adult students, many of whom enter literacy programs with low skills, special learning needs, or negative past experiences in school. Adult responsibilities make it especially challenging for these students to persist in a literacy program long enough to make meaningful progress toward reaching their literacy goals.

    Launched in 1999 and funded by the Wallace-Reader's Digest Funds, the Literacy in Libraries Across America (LILAA) initiative is aimed at helping literacy programs at public libraries across the country implement strategies to improve persistence among adult students. These strategies aim to make program attendance easier by offering child care, transportation, and expanded hours of operation. Instructional priorities include making program instruction more engaging and relevant by adapting curricula (often designed for children) to adult interests and needs, improving teacher and tutor training, and identifying potential barriers to persistence at program entry.

    As part of...

    Learning to read and write is a serious challenge for adult students, many of whom enter literacy programs with low skills, special learning needs, or negative past experiences in school. Adult responsibilities make it especially challenging for these students to persist in a literacy program long enough to make meaningful progress toward reaching their literacy goals.

    Launched in 1999 and funded by the Wallace-Reader's Digest Funds, the Literacy in Libraries Across America (LILAA) initiative is aimed at helping literacy programs at public libraries across the country implement strategies to improve persistence among adult students. These strategies aim to make program attendance easier by offering child care, transportation, and expanded hours of operation. Instructional priorities include making program instruction more engaging and relevant by adapting curricula (often designed for children) to adult interests and needs, improving teacher and tutor training, and identifying potential barriers to persistence at program entry.

    As part of the LILAA initiative, in 2000 MDRC and the National Center for the Study of Adult Learning and Literacy (NCSALL) began a three-year study of the implementation and effectiveness of strategies to increase student persistence in the adult literacy programs of five public libraries: Redwood City Public Library and Oakland Public Library in California, New York Public Library and Queens Borough Public Library in New York City, and Greensboro Public Library in North Carolina. Researchers are (1) collecting and analyzing data on demographic characteristics, program retention, hours spent in literacy activities, and student goals; and (2) studying students' experiences in the programs by conducting extensive ethnographic interviews, observations of classes and tutoring sessions, and focus groups.

    This report describes the design of the LILAA persistence study, the strategies that participating libraries are using to increase student persistence, and emerging implementation issues. It describes existing patterns in student persistence, identifies factors that support or inhibit persistence, and begins to explore the relationship between program strategies and persistence... (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Walsh, Stephen; Goldsmith, Deana; Abe, Yasuyo; Cann, Andrea
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    The Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites has its origins in the remarkable performance of a single employment and training program: the Center for Employment Training. CET is a community-based employment and training organization with headquarters in San Jose, California. CET received extensive attention in the early 1990s through the involvement of its San Jose headquarters in two major studies of employment and training programs for disadvantaged individuals. Both studies reported that participants in CET-San Jose’s programs achieved substantial and statistically significant gains in employment and earnings as compared to a control group not receiving CET services. CET-San Jose’s results were particularly noteworthy in relation to the results of outwardly similar programs. Among 16 employment and training providers participating in these two studies, CET-San Jose alone produced statistically measurable employment and earnings gains for its clients.

    Encouraged by these results, the U.S. Department of Labor sought to investigate how CET-San Jose’s successes could...

    The Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites has its origins in the remarkable performance of a single employment and training program: the Center for Employment Training. CET is a community-based employment and training organization with headquarters in San Jose, California. CET received extensive attention in the early 1990s through the involvement of its San Jose headquarters in two major studies of employment and training programs for disadvantaged individuals. Both studies reported that participants in CET-San Jose’s programs achieved substantial and statistically significant gains in employment and earnings as compared to a control group not receiving CET services. CET-San Jose’s results were particularly noteworthy in relation to the results of outwardly similar programs. Among 16 employment and training providers participating in these two studies, CET-San Jose alone produced statistically measurable employment and earnings gains for its clients.

    Encouraged by these results, the U.S. Department of Labor sought to investigate how CET-San Jose’s successes could benefit out-of-school youth and, in 1995, began an evaluation of efforts to replicate CET. In doing so, the Department of Labor anticipated the increased emphasis on services to out-of-school youth that would be mandated in the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA). WIA requires that a minimum of 30 percent of youth funds shall be used to provide activities to out-of-school youth, and encourages local programs to develop long-term, intensive services for youth. The Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites targeted out-of-school youth exclusively, and sought to provide them with intensive and comprehensive services leading to employment. This report’s findings thus appear at a critical junction in the reform of employment and training services for out-of-school youth.

    The Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites involved 12 sites in total. Six sites were located in eastern and mid-western states, and had begun their efforts to replicate CET-San Jose’s services in the early 1990s. Six additional sites were selected randomly from among those located in western states that had been operating CET programs between 5 and 20 years. All of the western sites were divisions of the CET corporation, as were two of the eastern and mid-western sites. The remaining eastern and mid-western sites included two community-based organizations and two administrative entities under the Job Training Partnership Act, the federally-funded employment and training program that preceded WIA.

    To investigate the potential benefits of CET-San Jose for out-of-school youth, the Evaluation of the CET Replication Sites was designed to examine the implementation experiences of these twelve sites, and to measure their impacts on a range of important outcomes, such as employment and earnings. This report addresses the first of these goals. It relies on data collected between 1996 and 1999 to document and explore the implementation experiences of the replication sites. A second report, scheduled for completion in 2002, will utilize long-term data on individual outcomes of CET applicants who were randomly assigned to a program group eligible for CET services or to a control group not eligible to receive these services. (author introduction)

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