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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Perez-Johnson, Irma; Moore, Quinn; Santillano, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    Following passage of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), local workforce investment areas have been required to use individual training accounts (ITAs) to fund most occupational training activities. With some restrictions, customers of the One-Stop system can use ITAs to select training from a wide array of state-approved programs and providers. States and local offices have a great deal of flexibility in deciding how to structure ITAs. At one extreme, local counselors can play a pivotal role in directing customers to particular training programs and closely tailoring ITA award amounts to each customer’s needs. At the other extreme, local staff can play a minor role, providing all customers with the same fixed ITA amounts, allowing customers to choose their training programs independently, and providing counseling only on request.

    This report presents long-term results from an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of three different models for delivering ITA services, with impacts measured six to eight years after program enrollment. The Employment and...

    Following passage of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA), local workforce investment areas have been required to use individual training accounts (ITAs) to fund most occupational training activities. With some restrictions, customers of the One-Stop system can use ITAs to select training from a wide array of state-approved programs and providers. States and local offices have a great deal of flexibility in deciding how to structure ITAs. At one extreme, local counselors can play a pivotal role in directing customers to particular training programs and closely tailoring ITA award amounts to each customer’s needs. At the other extreme, local staff can play a minor role, providing all customers with the same fixed ITA amounts, allowing customers to choose their training programs independently, and providing counseling only on request.

    This report presents long-term results from an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of three different models for delivering ITA services, with impacts measured six to eight years after program enrollment. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) at the U.S. Department of Labor designed the ITA experiment to provide federal, state, and local policymakers, administrators, and program managers with information on the tradeoffs inherent in different ITA service delivery models.

    As a part of the experiment, nearly 8,000 customers of One-Stop Centers in eight different sites were randomly assigned to one of the three ITA service delivery models tested in the ITA Experiment. These models varied along three policy-relevant dimensions (Table ES.1): (1) the ITA award structure (that is, whether the award amount was fixed for all customers or tailored to the customer’s needs); (2) required counseling (that is, whether ITA counseling was mandatory or optional, and its intensity); and (3) program approval (that is, whether counselors could reject customers’ training choices and deny an ITA, or had to approve them if the customer had completed his or her ITA requirements). (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Golonka, Susan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The number of youth aging out of foster care has increased every year since 2001. This population, although small in number, has a high economic cost to state governments and society as a whole. Yet, because there are relatively few of these young people, states that invest in them can make a large positive impact without incurring great cost. This report highlights effective state strategies and promising approaches aimed at improving outcomes for foster youth in the following five areas:

    • Education - promote educational attainment;
    • Employment - connect youth with employment and career training;
    • Housing - enhance access to safe and affordable housing;
    • Health care - help you gain access to and manage health care; and
    • Relationships - help youth build stable and lifelong relationships.

    (author abstract)

    The number of youth aging out of foster care has increased every year since 2001. This population, although small in number, has a high economic cost to state governments and society as a whole. Yet, because there are relatively few of these young people, states that invest in them can make a large positive impact without incurring great cost. This report highlights effective state strategies and promising approaches aimed at improving outcomes for foster youth in the following five areas:

    • Education - promote educational attainment;
    • Employment - connect youth with employment and career training;
    • Housing - enhance access to safe and affordable housing;
    • Health care - help you gain access to and manage health care; and
    • Relationships - help youth build stable and lifelong relationships.

    (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Liston, Cynthia D.; Donnan, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    Casey's Center for Working Families (CWF) partnered with community college programs across the county to help low-income students access, navigate and complete their community college courses. Detailed case studies show how five of these programs are making a difference. (Author abstract)

    Casey's Center for Working Families (CWF) partnered with community college programs across the county to help low-income students access, navigate and complete their community college courses. Detailed case studies show how five of these programs are making a difference. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Karpman, Michael
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2013

    National League of Cities has published a new report highlighting promising city efforts to improve the lives of children, youth and families in communities with populations below 75,000. "Municipal Leadership for Children and Families in Small and Mid-Sized Cities" provides a rich array of strategies shared by local officials representing more than 40 cities and towns across the country. The report combines in-depth case studies of comprehensive family strengthening efforts in Rapid City, S.D., and Manchester, Conn. with a set of shorter city practices categorized by topic area that highlight local action in a broad range of areas. (author abstract)

    National League of Cities has published a new report highlighting promising city efforts to improve the lives of children, youth and families in communities with populations below 75,000. "Municipal Leadership for Children and Families in Small and Mid-Sized Cities" provides a rich array of strategies shared by local officials representing more than 40 cities and towns across the country. The report combines in-depth case studies of comprehensive family strengthening efforts in Rapid City, S.D., and Manchester, Conn. with a set of shorter city practices categorized by topic area that highlight local action in a broad range of areas. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kirby, Gretchen; Lyskawa, Julia; Derr, Michelle; Brown, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Workforce Investment Act (WIA) programs provide employment and training services to a targeted population of low-income individuals. The similarities between the TANF and WIA programs have generated interest in the coordination and integration of services across the two programs since their inception in the late 1990s. Nonetheless, it remains unclear how and to what degree the programs are coordinating at the state and local level. The Study of TANF/WIA Coordination, initiated by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation explored the supports, strategies, and considerations that influence coordination within selected locations across the country.

    The information presented in this report and accompanying brief comes from interviews with state and local respondents in 8 states and 11 localities. Authors describe 12 strategies for TANF/WIA coordination that the study sites use and that other locations may choose to replicate. The strategies fall under six program components: (1) administration and management; (2)...

    The Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and Workforce Investment Act (WIA) programs provide employment and training services to a targeted population of low-income individuals. The similarities between the TANF and WIA programs have generated interest in the coordination and integration of services across the two programs since their inception in the late 1990s. Nonetheless, it remains unclear how and to what degree the programs are coordinating at the state and local level. The Study of TANF/WIA Coordination, initiated by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation explored the supports, strategies, and considerations that influence coordination within selected locations across the country.

    The information presented in this report and accompanying brief comes from interviews with state and local respondents in 8 states and 11 localities. Authors describe 12 strategies for TANF/WIA coordination that the study sites use and that other locations may choose to replicate. The strategies fall under six program components: (1) administration and management; (2) funding; (3) policies and procedures; (4) program missions and knowledge; (5) services for customers; and (6) accountability and performance measurement. Using the practices of the study sites, the report defines levels of coordination for each of the 12 strategies. The report also includes a postscript addressing key TANF-Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act coordination points. (author abstract)

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