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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Abt Associates, Inc.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2006

    In 1995, the Annie E. Casey Foundation launched the Jobs Initiative, a $30-million investment over eight years in six cities to help disadvantaged, low-skilled workers secure jobs earning family-supporting wages. As the Jobs Initiative unfolded, issues quickly arose demonstrating that race, ethnicity and cultural perspectives mattered for job seekers, employers and others – particularly workforce development organizations-involved in connecting these two groups. To share what the Jobs Initiative sites were learning about how these issues emerged in workforce development, the Foundation published Taking the Initiative on Jobs and Race (2001), a report which offers a perspective about how to think, talk and act about the complexity of race and regional labor markets, particularly for low-skilled workers. Since that report, the Jobs Initiative experience illustrates that issues of race, ethnicity and culture arise along every point on the continuum of workforce development. Paying attention to these issues enhances the likelihood that workforce development efforts will achieve their...

    In 1995, the Annie E. Casey Foundation launched the Jobs Initiative, a $30-million investment over eight years in six cities to help disadvantaged, low-skilled workers secure jobs earning family-supporting wages. As the Jobs Initiative unfolded, issues quickly arose demonstrating that race, ethnicity and cultural perspectives mattered for job seekers, employers and others – particularly workforce development organizations-involved in connecting these two groups. To share what the Jobs Initiative sites were learning about how these issues emerged in workforce development, the Foundation published Taking the Initiative on Jobs and Race (2001), a report which offers a perspective about how to think, talk and act about the complexity of race and regional labor markets, particularly for low-skilled workers. Since that report, the Jobs Initiative experience illustrates that issues of race, ethnicity and culture arise along every point on the continuum of workforce development. Paying attention to these issues enhances the likelihood that workforce development efforts will achieve their desired results. Those involved in the Jobs Initiative know firsthand that these issues merit attention not only because of what they have learned but because these are timely issues worldwide. As the world economy becomes more global and as the U.S. becomes increasingly ethnically diverse, the world of work is changing. The demographics of America’s workforce historically have influenced the structure and evolution of this nation’s economy. Today, as the nation’s ethnic minority population grows, it is virtually impossible to overlook or ignore issues of race, ethnicity and culture, especially if workforce development efforts aimed at supporting low-skilled, entry-level workers are to succeed. By sharing lessons learned, the Jobs Initiative seeks again to contribute to a wider discourse about how to strengthen the success of America’s workforce by acknowledging and using to everyone’s advantage diverse racial, ethnic and cultural perspectives. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hebert, Scott; Parkes, S. Rhae; Schneider, Glen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2005

    By using case studies, this report evaluates the Jobs Initiative, Casey's six-city, eight-year effort to engage local institutions and stakeholders while identifying improved approaches to workforce development services for disadvantaged job seekers. The report delves into a community's ability to create large-scale, system-wide change and help poor families improve their chances in finding quality employment  It examines the intentional workforce development system improvements in four of the Jobs Initiative sites: Seattle, WA; Milwaukee, WI; St. Louis, MO; and Philadelphia, PA. (author abstract)

    By using case studies, this report evaluates the Jobs Initiative, Casey's six-city, eight-year effort to engage local institutions and stakeholders while identifying improved approaches to workforce development services for disadvantaged job seekers. The report delves into a community's ability to create large-scale, system-wide change and help poor families improve their chances in finding quality employment  It examines the intentional workforce development system improvements in four of the Jobs Initiative sites: Seattle, WA; Milwaukee, WI; St. Louis, MO; and Philadelphia, PA. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Alamprese, Judith A. ; Gwaltney, M. K.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    This document is the final report from the Adult Basic Education State Delivery System Strategic Planning and Service Provision Demonstration Project, also known as the Adult Education Coordination and Planning (AECAP) project. AECAP tested processes for state and local planning and interagency coordination as a way of facilitating the expansion and quality of adult education and workforce services in six states (Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Missouri, and Washington). This final report describes the planning processes and technical assistance activities that were conducted during the project.

    The state adult education staff and their partners in the AECAP project worked together to support 12 local pilot sites in their development of service models in the areas identified by the state. Nine of the 12 local pilot sites in the AECAP project involved state staff working with their partners to develop coordinated service models, which included the following: (1) Cross-referral of clients between ABE programs and One-Stop Centers (three sites); (2) Targeted...

    This document is the final report from the Adult Basic Education State Delivery System Strategic Planning and Service Provision Demonstration Project, also known as the Adult Education Coordination and Planning (AECAP) project. AECAP tested processes for state and local planning and interagency coordination as a way of facilitating the expansion and quality of adult education and workforce services in six states (Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Missouri, and Washington). This final report describes the planning processes and technical assistance activities that were conducted during the project.

    The state adult education staff and their partners in the AECAP project worked together to support 12 local pilot sites in their development of service models in the areas identified by the state. Nine of the 12 local pilot sites in the AECAP project involved state staff working with their partners to develop coordinated service models, which included the following: (1) Cross-referral of clients between ABE programs and One-Stop Centers (three sites); (2) Targeted instructional services for specific ABE populations (three sites); and (3) Provision of integrated ABE/ESL and occupational courses as a pathway to employment or postsecondary technical training (three sites) (Author Abstract).

  • Individual Author: Manno, Michelle ; Yang, Edith
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop describes an implementation study of a workforce development program for disconnected youth named Project Rise. Funded by a Social Innovation Fund grant and delivered across three sites in New York, NY, Newark, NJ, and Kansas City, MO, the program provides job-readiness preparation, academic instruction, internships and transition support for young adults without a high school diploma who have been disconnected from education for at least 6 months.

    This presentation from the 2015 NAWRS workshop describes an implementation study of a workforce development program for disconnected youth named Project Rise. Funded by a Social Innovation Fund grant and delivered across three sites in New York, NY, Newark, NJ, and Kansas City, MO, the program provides job-readiness preparation, academic instruction, internships and transition support for young adults without a high school diploma who have been disconnected from education for at least 6 months.

  • Individual Author: Hsueh, JoAnn; Jacobs, Erin; Farrell, Mary
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    Children living in poverty face considerable developmental risks. This report presents interim results from an evaluation of parental employment and educational services delivered within a two-generational, early childhood program targeting low-income families who are expecting a child or who have a child under age 3. This study is part of the Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, with additional funding from the U.S. Department of Labor. The program model tested here aims to dually address both the employment and educational needs of parents who are at risk of unemployment and the developmental needs of their young children. The program’s effects are being studied by examining 610 families who were randomly assigned to a program group, which received the enhanced two-generational program, or to a control group, which could only access alternative services in the community. (author abstract)

    Children living in poverty face considerable developmental risks. This report presents interim results from an evaluation of parental employment and educational services delivered within a two-generational, early childhood program targeting low-income families who are expecting a child or who have a child under age 3. This study is part of the Enhanced Services for the Hard-to-Employ Demonstration and Evaluation project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, with additional funding from the U.S. Department of Labor. The program model tested here aims to dually address both the employment and educational needs of parents who are at risk of unemployment and the developmental needs of their young children. The program’s effects are being studied by examining 610 families who were randomly assigned to a program group, which received the enhanced two-generational program, or to a control group, which could only access alternative services in the community. (author abstract)

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